D.O.C.'s = Dis'ers of Color (Disney Fans of Color)

Would you like a dedicated/featured Forum for D.O.C.'s Dis'ers Of Color & Allies


  • Total voters
    195

Tiggerette

DIS Veteran
DVC Gold
Joined
Jun 30, 2013
Keylenne, Thank you so much for posting. I've been reflecting on it since I read it yesterday, while watching the piece with Oprah and Meghan talking about different race issues. It's so clear to me that there is SO MUCH I don't know just on a day to day experience. As I listened to Meghan talk about suicidal thoughts, it became so obvious to me that racism is a real epidemic. On the TV I saw a woman of color talk about her experiences on a national scale, and yours on a local, and they both demonstrate the real harm that privilege and ignorance (or willfull blindness) can create. And let's not forget your very important thoughts for LGBTQIA+ persons.

I want to thank you for posting, for being brave, for helping to shine a light. I hope that I can continue to listen, to ally in whatever way is helpful. When we rise, we rise together.
 

kylenne

Wakandan-American
Joined
Oct 16, 2016
It's sad that anyone should feel that way in public. Unfortunately, with whatever progress that has been made a lot still needs to be done. Let's hope people in future generations benefit from the slow, hard work being done today. Then to add the Oprah interview not long after watching the Theme Park Express piece was even worse...
Ohhh that certainly did not help my mood at all. Meghan’s story was way too familiar...I’ve been having a lot of conversations today with woc about how if you strip away the wealth and traditions and fancy trappings, every Black woman alive has experienced a version of this story in white-dominated workplaces. There is a distinct pattern of evil folk not wanting you to have the job, setting you up to fail, and then when you outshine them despite all of their microaggressions, then come the open attempts at sabotage to force you out of the org. HR existing not to protect you but to protect the org’s interests. Being labeled as “difficult”, said to be “bullying” if you speak up or assert boundaries. The toll it takes on your mental health. I watched my older sister, a very educated woman (2 Masters degrees) go through this at her last 3 jobs. It’s happened to me. And this is why we have always believed Meghan and had her back. We always knew. Especially when you have an institution founded on imperialism and colonialism and exploitation of people of color. There was no way this was gonna end any other way, I’m just thankful she has a husband who loves her so much and will do what he has to in order to protect her and their growing family. Also thankful that his mother had the foresight to protect him, even after she was tragically gone.
 

kylenne

Wakandan-American
Joined
Oct 16, 2016
I just want to add that it’s not always been awful—especially on my solo trips, I have met so many kind and interesting people at the parks and resorts. One of my fondest memories was the time I spent the better part of a Sunday just chatting with people in the adults only hot tub at SAB. I was the only poc there but it didn’t matter one bit, we all loved Disney to death (all of us were out of state APs just down to enjoy Food & Wine on a long holiday weekend), and funny enough we were all escaping brutal weather in the Northeast.

When I think about the most fun I’ve had at the World, it’s always involving the people I’ve met. Like the older couple in the Chase Disney meet & greet at Epcot that actually ended up taking pictures with me because we bonded so much in that long, long queue lol.

I would honestly say that the positive interactions have far outweighed the nasty stuff. But the nasty stuff definitely is lurking and it’s somehow extra painful that even in the bubble I can’t 100% take the armor off.
 

Tonyz

How do ya do? Pretty good, sure as you're born!
Joined
May 17, 2014
Racism like that just utterly astounds me. Like, do these people really think you gotta be white to stay at places like this - and that’s it’s such common sense that they have no problem openly expressing it to others??

I hope experiences like this in Disney World are few and far between... I want that Disney bubble to exist for everyone.
 

cindianne320

DIS Veteran
Joined
Oct 27, 2010
While I am not a PoC, and do not understand the trials you face every day. I'm trying. Thank you for sharing your stories. I continue to educate myself on being an ally and an anti-racist.
I do have an experience of checking into a deluxe, though. I am a white, middle class female. I was getting on the Magical Express and told the driver that I was headed to Beach Club. He insisted I must mean Caribbean Beach. It was a yucky feeling.
 

LiveLifeLoud

Making Memories
Joined
Mar 12, 2021
Offering this here for discussion, because I frankly don’t trust the Resorts board not to get out of pocket, and I really feel a way and need to vent to people who understand.

Theme Park Express is one of my fave Disney vloggers and he posted a video today of his experience checking into the Grand Floridian villas, he and his gf were gifted a stay by a subscriber who had a ton of expiring DVC points.

I bring it up here because dude is a visibly brown man, and his literal first experience with this resort was pulling up in his car, getting the bags out and searching for a luggage cart while a nearby female CM totally ignored him, talking to another guest. So he went inside to be greeted by a well dressed male CM (I’m assuming the CMs that sometimes hang around the lobby with iPads, guessing from previous stays elsewhere), who asked if he could help him, and vlogger dude said that he needed a luggage cart. The CM told him the female CM outside was supposed to assist with that sort of thing and so they went outside together to see her, and when the male CM asked her why she didn’t assist, homegirl literally said she thought vlogger guy was just delivering groceries. Mind you, he was obviously pulling luggage out of his car, he had a t-shirt with the name of his YouTube channel on it and had a camera.

This incident especially stands out to me because not 2 days ago I was watching another cool Disney vlogger I subscribe to, Jackie over on SuperEnthused, also do a video where she stayed at the GFV thanks to a generous subscriber who gave her DVC points they couldn’t use. Needless to say nobody was mistaking this bleached blonde white girl for Instacart on her video.

So. That was his initial impression. And then later on in the video, at the pool, he mentioned being the darkest man there, and the vibe from guests being That Way that most any POC who has ever been in a predominately white space knows all too well. His gf is white as well and I’m sure that did not help anything. My heart broke for him, and it made me angry for him. The fact that he titled this video “we don’t belong here!” broke my heart even more. I have fought all my life against that mentality

Like, I have talked about this before, as a dark skinned woc who pretty much only stays at Deluxes (aside from a stay at POFQ). I am used to that vibe. I got the same stares hanging around the Poly with my own gf who is also white, though in our case being an obviously queer couple was also a strike against us with these lowkey bigots--my gf is very gender nonconforming and identifies as butch and while I am nonbinary I am a femme and very much read as a woman. I talked about our experience with other guests, the thinly veiled hostility we felt in the women’s lounge at the GF Senses. People like us are not supposed to be in these spaces, according to the narrow minded, and being a triple minority the way I am you feel it even more. I have been that Black woman mistaken for “the help”. I have had other guests give me the hairy eyeball while walking with a coverup and my mug. To put it plainly there are too many who think poc and Black people specifically can’t afford nice things. Even Nice People(tm) have rather poorly contained their shock when we talk and they discover how well-traveled I am.

I mean, I have an extremely thick skin for this sort of thing, mainly because I’ve been exposed to this kind of garbage from literal childhood and I know how to handle it. I know how to navigate fancy mostly white spaces and I never ever let anyone make me feel like I don’t belong somewhere. But even with all of that, quite frankly this was not the sort of thing I wanted to see 2 months before I check in for my first ever GF stay. Like I said I am used to it from other guests at Deluxes, but I have never gotten that kind of attitude from CMs at those resorts. It makes me question my choices, especially since this is my first time going anywhere much less WDW since the pandemic started, and encountering racist CMs when I’m trying to enjoy a milestone birthday (quite possibly alone) and surviving all this mess would just be too much.
I am a medium colored Latina and my husband is a darker Latino. I have felt this at Disney also, particularly at signatures. It’s the vibe of “you don’t belong here or can’t afford it here.” Like you, we don’t let it bother us and know how to roll with it. We’ve been dealing with it all of our lives.
 
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OKW Lover

Retired and living 2 miles from The Castle.
DIS Lifetime Sponsor
Joined
Apr 29, 2004
I am a medium colored Latina and my husband is a darker Latino. I have felt this at Disney also, particularly at signatures. It’s the vibe of “you don’t belong here or can’t afford it here.” Like you, we don’t let it bother us and know how to roll with it. We’ve been dealing with it all of our lives.
Stories like this sadden me. As an apparently privileged white male I obviously can't relate. I really, really wish that we all had the same opportunities in this world. Imagine how much we could accomplish if everybody had an equal chance to participate and contribute to society.

Yes, I know, preaching to the choir. Sigh...
 
  • bavarian princess

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    Mar 26, 2016
    Thanks to all of you for sharing your experience. The good and the bad ones. It’s extremely interesting and insightful for me since I am German and obviously have made different experiences in life and probably am not always as sensitive regarding certain ‚vibes‘.

    I have traveled to WDW many times with family and friends (none of them POC) but also solo. I stayed solo in basically all categories from moderate to deluxe. And twice at Pop :teeth: I eat at table service restaurants solo (they once placed me solo in the middle of tusker house :rolleyes1and yes I go there for the food ;) ). And honestly I cannot even say if people look because I am on my own or because I am not white. Maybe both. And honestly I don’t care. Nobody tells me where I should go or should not go. Or where I belong or not belong. I think it’s somehow also educational if people who think they are more entitled because of their (white) skin color (or believes, orientation etc.) have to realize that this is obviously not that case. Especially since it’s not only about racism it’s also about stereotypes.

    I must say people have always been super lovely to me from CMs to guests. No one ever made me feel unwelcome but I am once again probably not as aware due to my background.

    Having said that I can completely relate to some of your experiences (since racism exists everywhere in the world) and I hope it doesn’t sound like I downplay them. It saddens me that people even have to deal with those things when they go to the ‚most magical place on earth‘.

    The CM told him the female CM outside was supposed to assist with that sort of thing and so they went outside together to see her, and when the male CM asked her why she didn’t assist, homegirl literally said she thought vlogger guy was just delivering groceries. Mind you, he was obviously pulling luggage out of his car, he had a t-shirt with the name of his YouTube channel on it
    I am probably a bit late on commenting on your post but I still want to say thanks for bringing that topic up. It really is heartbreaking and I hope Disney will train their CMs (even) better in the future. And also includes breaking up those stereotypes.
     

    808blessing

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    Dec 5, 2020
    Let’s discuss anti-racism “training” or is it reprogramming. The transformational stuff, if it exists. I hope to God it does. What really works? White people or BIPOC- have you seen people become unracist? Is that a thing? What works?
    I have ideas but you go first.
     

    Tiggerette

    DIS Veteran
    DVC Gold
    Joined
    Jun 30, 2013
    Let’s discuss anti-racism “training” or is it reprogramming. The transformational stuff, if it exists. I hope to God it does. What really works? White people or BIPOC- have you seen people become unracist? Is that a thing? What works?
    I have ideas but you go first.
    Hey, I don't want to take this reply adrift from the thread topic. It sounds like these questions are best as a thread on its own. To stay in topic, I will reply to say that I've found first-hand discussion, actively listening AND believing their experiences to be key in one aspect of self-education. Having DoC (DISers of Color) speak to their experiences has been incredibly valuable to learning about struggles and joys. To ally means to do our own work to self-educate, and among other actions, it means giving space to center DoC voices. It's not displacement, it's truly sharing so we can hear and see one another authentically. So, what works? I think this thread has been transformational. I'm grateful.
     
  • 808blessing

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    Dec 5, 2020
    Is it just me or does this thread not have Jump to New on the top? It’s probably just me because I was the last one who posted. Lol
     

    Missingmypooh

    Annual pass addict
    Joined
    Jan 25, 2021
    Disney Pixar's “Soul”
    Walks a tight Jazz line to avoid stereotype troupes and, in the end, is a cool movie that features real elements of New York City and a great sound track.
    View attachment 555759
    (Photo credit Disney Pixar)

    Disney / Pixar’s “Soul" made history as Pixar's first-ever animated film led by a Black actor, Jamie Foxx.
    View attachment 555760
    (Disney/ Pixar)

    This article introduces the treatment of Black & Brown animated characters and how Disney Pixar took steps to ensure “Soul” would not commit stereotypical troupes of the past.

    “Soul" is the latest in a string of animated movies ("The Princess and the Frog," "Spies in Disguise," "The Emperor's New Groove") that borders on the edge of the troupe where Black or people of color in leading human characters are transformed into animals or non-human characters/creatures for a majority of their on-screen time. This style of representation evolved into s stereotypical troupe.
    The act of taking away nonwhite characters’ racial identities dates back as far as the early 2000s. In Disney’s “The Emperor’s New Groove” (2000) and “Brother Bear” (2003), native Incan and Alaskan Native American characters, respectively, are transformed into animals for the majority of their on-screen time.

    “Soul” film directors Pete Docter and Kemp Powers, along with producer Dana Murray were asked if they had any thoughts on the trend of Black characters not appearing human in an animated film's entirety.
    Pete Docter said the team was initially unaware of the trope. Joe's time in the movie is split about evenly on Earth and in the "soul" world.
    Co-director Kemp Powers (who identifies as Black) was brought in as a consultant and Co-Director as the animators had to create "caution cones" since it's the first time Pixar is "telling a Black man's story in an animated film."
    Pixar has been working on "Soul" for about the past five years since the release of 2015's "Inside Out," which earned an Oscar.
    Kemp Powers joined the film during its last two years of production. In an interview, Powers told the press that at the time he joined, the film was in "pretty rough form."

    Soul animates the Black & Brown tribal counsel, aka “the Barbershop.”

    Power’s contributions to “Soul” redeemed the movie’s ending, including more screen time for “Joe Gardner” on earth. In the final version of “Soul,” we see “Joe’s” connections to his real life on earth and a deeper backstory with his family. The Barbershop scene calls to the true to life importance of the neighborhood Black Barbershop. Although it is a small scene in the movie, the neighborhood Barbershop is where Black & Brown men connect with the community and their neighborhood brothers. The Barbershop for many Black & Brown men functions as the urban “Tribal counsel,” a place to exchange wisdom. That scene instantly connects with Black & Brown audiences as more than just a place for a haircut.

    View attachment 555761
    Disney / Pixar

    The heart and soul of the movie is Jazz music.
    The character “Joe Gardner’s” piano performances in Soul were written and performed by Louisiana native musician Jon Batiste, bandleader and musical director on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert. Jon Batiste has recorded and performed with artists in various music genres (Stevie Wonder, Prince, Willie Nelson, Lenny Kravitz, Ed Sheeran, and Mavis Staples), released his recordings.
    View attachment 555762
    Photo Credit (Amy Harris/Invision/AP/Shutterstock)
    Jon Batiste is New Orleans music royalty, the Batiste family, including Lionel Batiste of the Treme Brass Band, Milton Batiste of the Olympia Brass Band, composer and arranger Harold Battiste, and Russell Batiste Jr.
    The selection of Jon Batiste to write and perform the Jazz selections and the musical performances of the character “Joe Gardner” was a brilliant choice. Because Jon is known for his eclectic music that is often a smooth mixture of jazz, soul, R&B, and other soulful genres. Batiste was responsible for the Jazz compositions, and the arrangements heard throughout New York City

    View attachment 555763
    Photo credit Disney
    Grammy award-winning Jazz artist Herbie Hancock was consulted to ensure “Joe Garder’s” passion for Jazz was portrayed on screen with depth and sincerity.
    Mr. Herbie Hancock added to the authenticity of Jazz music and its connection to the African American experience.

    “Soul” is an enjoyable story featuring Disney / Pixar’s first Black male leading character.

    Will Disney-Pixar's "Soul" be a Disney Classic for you and your family?
    What Disney (live-action or animated) or Pixar movie is your favorite featuring people of color?
    Wow. I’m speechless. Both in Sadness that I’ve never noticed this trope despite it being glaringly obvious ( but obviously do now) and that it’s so pervasive in our culture to accept this as “normal”.

    the crappy part is that many people are using Disney stories to help create diversity, but it barely scratches the problem when you consider that the next generation will think it’s normal for BIPOC to be only on screen for half the time.

    our local librarian has committed to making the library balanced and has gotten tons of new diverse books and created beautifully balanced displays. I don’t think we’ve seen this trope in any of the books. Our librarian has been making sure the books are authentic (written by bipoc-not for bipoc) so that has likely helped, as the only book with disparities was an actual Disney book. Tiana got one page, the other princesses got 2-3 pages each. My son noticed and really, that’s what it takes. Honest conversations even when it’s hard.

    I don’t feel appropriate adding to the personal stories as that takes away from those who need to share (best for me to quietly read, learn, evaluate, empathize) but I did write down many of the tidbits and facts you’ve shared this thread, especially because I can share them with my very young kids to help them understand how to appreciate and respect diversity and culture. Thanks for taking time out of your day to share!
     

    PollyannaMom

    I was a click-clack champ!!
    Joined
    May 16, 2006
    Is it just me or does this thread not have Jump to New on the top? It’s probably just me because I was the last one who posted. Lol
    I do see the button, so I'm guessing it was just missing because there were no new posts since your last one when you looked. (I'll check that theory once I've posted this.)

    ETA - Yep, it disappeared after I posted!
     

    redrosesix

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Feb 29, 2008
    Offering this here for discussion, because I frankly don’t trust the Resorts board not to get out of pocket, and I really feel a way and need to vent to people who understand.

    Theme Park Express is one of my fave Disney vloggers and he posted a video today of his experience checking into the Grand Floridian villas, he and his gf were gifted a stay by a subscriber who had a ton of expiring DVC points.

    I bring it up here because dude is a visibly brown man, and his literal first experience with this resort was pulling up in his car, getting the bags out and searching for a luggage cart while a nearby female CM totally ignored him, talking to another guest. So he went inside to be greeted by a well dressed male CM (I’m assuming the CMs that sometimes hang around the lobby with iPads, guessing from previous stays elsewhere), who asked if he could help him, and vlogger dude said that he needed a luggage cart. The CM told him the female CM outside was supposed to assist with that sort of thing and so they went outside together to see her, and when the male CM asked her why she didn’t assist, homegirl literally said she thought vlogger guy was just delivering groceries. Mind you, he was obviously pulling luggage out of his car, he had a t-shirt with the name of his YouTube channel on it and had a camera.

    This incident especially stands out to me because not 2 days ago I was watching another cool Disney vlogger I subscribe to, Jackie over on SuperEnthused, also do a video where she stayed at the GFV thanks to a generous subscriber who gave her DVC points they couldn’t use. Needless to say nobody was mistaking this bleached blonde white girl for Instacart on her video.

    So. That was his initial impression. And then later on in the video, at the pool, he mentioned being the darkest man there, and the vibe from guests being That Way that most any POC who has ever been in a predominately white space knows all too well. His gf is white as well and I’m sure that did not help anything. My heart broke for him, and it made me angry for him. The fact that he titled this video “we don’t belong here!” broke my heart even more. I have fought all my life against that mentality

    Like, I have talked about this before, as a dark skinned woc who pretty much only stays at Deluxes (aside from a stay at POFQ). I am used to that vibe. I got the same stares hanging around the Poly with my own gf who is also white, though in our case being an obviously queer couple was also a strike against us with these lowkey bigots--my gf is very gender nonconforming and identifies as butch and while I am nonbinary I am a femme and very much read as a woman. I talked about our experience with other guests, the thinly veiled hostility we felt in the women’s lounge at the GF Senses. People like us are not supposed to be in these spaces, according to the narrow minded, and being a triple minority the way I am you feel it even more. I have been that Black woman mistaken for “the help”. I have had other guests give me the hairy eyeball while walking with a coverup and my mug. To put it plainly there are too many who think poc and Black people specifically can’t afford nice things. Even Nice People(tm) have rather poorly contained their shock when we talk and they discover how well-traveled I am.

    I mean, I have an extremely thick skin for this sort of thing, mainly because I’ve been exposed to this kind of garbage from literal childhood and I know how to handle it. I know how to navigate fancy mostly white spaces and I never ever let anyone make me feel like I don’t belong somewhere. But even with all of that, quite frankly this was not the sort of thing I wanted to see 2 months before I check in for my first ever GF stay. Like I said I am used to it from other guests at Deluxes, but I have never gotten that kind of attitude from CMs at those resorts. It makes me question my choices, especially since this is my first time going anywhere much less WDW since the pandemic started, and encountering racist CMs when I’m trying to enjoy a milestone birthday (quite possibly alone) and surviving all this mess would just be too much.
    I think it's good you put it here. My family probably will never have enough money to stay at the GF (at least until some time after I finish my PhD and my kids finish uni) but more than that my DH would avoid places like that. He's a skinny red head who looks like a drummer, because that is what he is. He grew up quite poor and he often says that the same people who would suck up to him after he plays on stage would look down their noses at him if he entered a hotel like that. These are the same people who are giving you "those looks" at the pool. They somehow think that some people reduce the status of the place, they like thinking they're more special than (insert person) so that's why they can afford it and (insert person) can't. By (insert person) being there it makes it less exclusive, so they feel less special. It doesn't matter that I can go anywhere and overlook those things -- he can't. We could dress him up to look posh, but that wouldn't be him and he's not going to change who he is to fit in with people like that.

    It's them -- not you. And while I don't think you can do much about guests like that, it's completely unacceptable from a staff member regardless of the star level of a hotel. They deserve to at least be suspended so they can be lectured on how that is unacceptable and have some time to re-think how and why they hold stereotypes of people who don't look like them. Some people would have them fired, but I honestly don't think it helps to give people a grievance. Prejudice is a learned behaviour and it can be unlearned, and this CM would become an example for other staff members. I would like to think an apology would be part of the deal, but I'm in Canada so restorative justice type actions might not be how it gets handled there.

    I hope you don't have to spend your birthday alone, but congratulations on making it to this one -- definitely worth celebrating.
     
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    redrosesix

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Feb 29, 2008
    That’s the Ugh in ugly racism in present and past times. :( I can validate with many experiences where people do not expect nor think I deserve the experiences I am having because of assumptions. It’s subtle to most but real. If you are lurking and know it is real, or starting to wonder if it is-consider doing something new. Don’t just be a silent observer or wonderer. Figure out what you can do to end it - do your small part- or racism will continue in future times.
    I think people need to decide whether they're for racism or against it -- when you put it in those terms, it makes it much easier to decide what you should or shouldn't accept around you.

    At the same time, while some of us might have people in our families who hold prejudiced views, people who are anti-racist are less likely to have people like that in our group of self-selected friends. We're more likely to come up against it at work or in settings as above ie. people we don't know.
     

    JodieJRanch

    Earning My Ears
    Joined
    Mar 11, 2021
    I think people need to decide whether they're for racism or against it -- when you put it in those terms, it makes it much easier to decide what you should or shouldn't accept around you.

    At the same time, while some of us might have people in our families who hold prejudiced views, people who are anti-racist are less likely to have people like that in our group of self-selected friends. We're more likely to come up against it at work or in settings as above ie. people we don't know.
    People first need to understand and have a definition of exactly what "Racism" is. It appears that it has become this giant all encompassing monstrosity with a life all its own. I know what being a Racist means to me. It's blaming a race for ones own problems, or the problems of ones own race. People of all races can be racist. It's as simple as that. It makes people feel better when they have something to blame. It's not my fault. It's the easy way to get through life. Does racism exist? Y E S. Is it systemic? In my opinion, N O. Has it become a political tool? Y E S. A tool for what? To divide people. A divided house cannot stand and the groups/people truly pushing the concept of systemic racism, don't want the house ie the country to stand. To me, it's as simple as that.
     
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    PollyannaMom

    I was a click-clack champ!!
    Joined
    May 16, 2006
    People first need to understand and have a definition of exactly what "Racism" is.
    To me, individual racism is expecting another person to be somehow “less” than you because of their race, and treating them accordingly.

    And systemic racism is policies - both now and in the past (because past policies have real ripple effects today) - that make life more difficult for people of one race than another.
     

    Tiggerette

    DIS Veteran
    DVC Gold
    Joined
    Jun 30, 2013
    Hi jodieJRanch, I hear in your post that racism isn't systemic. I think we might be working from different definitions. Institutionalized privilege and institutionalized racism happens at a systemic level.
    I'll give a recent example: when Massachusetts rolled out the vaccine eligibility for all persons over 75+ (beginning of phase 2) it disproportionately privileged white people to get the vaccine over people of color. White people (because of access to medical, wellness resources over a lifetime, including treatment at facilities) have a higher life expectancy of about ten years than people of color.

    I believe when this racial disparity was discovered the general access was changed to persons 65+ and older. To me, this is a prime example of institutionalized privilege, where simply being another race afforded greater access to beneficial resources (the vaccine) that others did not have. Of course, there are other complex issues at hand: perhaps those from statistically lower life expectancy groups also statistically had co-morbidities that offered them eligibility, where their age did not. So I don't mean to distill a complex issue solely to age.

    What I am saying is that the blanket rule creating eligibility by a higher age of 75+ did demonstrate where some racial groups had access that others did not. It highlighted the statistical advantage of one over the other, and to me it highlighted why we need to pay attention to systemic racism that occurs through institutionalized privilege.
     

    redrosesix

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Feb 29, 2008
    I think that in the US, racism is used to describe any amount of bias based on race -- I'm from Canada so I go along with it just to make it easier in forums like this.

    But for me, racism is the product of prejudice and power, like any -ism. This starts with stereotyping (which can be good or bad, helpful or troublesome), which comes from the culture and not from within ourselves. But when we internalize them they cause us to think differently about groups of people -- that is prejudice ie. making assumptions about an individual because of the stereotypes we believe about the group.

    When we are in a position to make decisions and we allow our prejudice to affect these decisions, that is discrimination -- racism when the prejudice is against a given race. This becomes cyclical in that people within that group can internalize the effects of discrimination, in that they act differently than if these prejudices did not exist. Their actions can reinforce the stereotype.

    With racism in particular, I think the problem starts with sorting people by colour. If you think about it rationally, skin colour affects very little about us except for whether we burn in the sun (or based on recent evidence, whether we are more likely to be deficient in vitamin D). So back to the vlogger example...

    The CM saw the vlogger. From somewhere, she obviously held the stereotype that white people are rich and black people deliver groceries, which led to the prejudice that only white people could afford to stay at the GF. Attitudes like this could lead to poorer service or even possibly rudeness to black guests ie. discrimination. This could be internalized by black guests such that they no longer stay there (and neither do their friends) so they stay at less expensive resorts, thus reinforcing the assumption that only white people have lots of money.

    I still think the CMs mistake was to see skin colour rather than luggage. I think it's an acceptable stereotype that if someone is unloading luggage, they are a guest.

    The best place I know of for anti-racism training is the Sioux Lookout Anti-Racism Project. They're on facebook.
     

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