D.O.C.'s = Dis'ers of Color (Disney Fans of Color)

Would you like a dedicated/featured Forum for D.O.C.'s Dis'ers Of Color & Allies


  • Total voters
    194

AKL Ranger

Mouseketeer
Joined
Dec 7, 2009
555757
Black History Month is celebrated for the entire month of February.
Once February 1st rolls in, It seems everywhere you look there are posters and recognition for Black History month which occurs during the month of February. Then comes the second week of February and marketing calendars shift toward Saint Valentine's Day. Thoughts of Spring St and St. Patricks day and National Tartan Week (Scottish Week) are all good reasons to look forward to March & April. But not so fast, we have so much more history to celebrate. 😊

The original AKL Ranger 🦓 🇰🇪 🦁
(Animal Kingdom Lodge)
Protecting Jambo House from poachers.
 
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AKL Ranger

Mouseketeer
Joined
Dec 7, 2009
Happy New Year of the Metal OX 2021

"The ox, in Chinese culture, is a hardworking zodiac sign. It usually signifies movements so, hopefully, the world will be less static than last year and get moving again in the second half of the year."

555758

To our Asian Brothers & Sisters, the Dis D.O.C.’s family wishes you "gong hei fat choy", or "gōngxǐ fācái", prosperity and good fortune.

The original AKL Ranger 🦓 🇰🇪 🦁
(Animal Kingdom Lodge)
Protecting Jambo House from poachers.
 
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AKL Ranger

Mouseketeer
Joined
Dec 7, 2009
Disney Pixar's “Soul”
Walks a tight Jazz line to avoid stereotype troupes and, in the end, is a cool movie that features real elements of New York City and a great sound track.
555759
(Photo credit Disney Pixar)

Disney / Pixar’s “Soul" made history as Pixar's first-ever animated film led by a Black actor, Jamie Foxx.
555760
(Disney/ Pixar)

This article introduces the treatment of Black & Brown animated characters and how Disney Pixar took steps to ensure “Soul” would not commit stereotypical troupes of the past.

“Soul" is the latest in a string of animated movies ("The Princess and the Frog," "Spies in Disguise," "The Emperor's New Groove") that borders on the edge of the troupe where Black or people of color in leading human characters are transformed into animals or non-human characters/creatures for a majority of their on-screen time. This style of representation evolved into s stereotypical troupe.
The act of taking away nonwhite characters’ racial identities dates back as far as the early 2000s. In Disney’s “The Emperor’s New Groove” (2000) and “Brother Bear” (2003), native Incan and Alaskan Native American characters, respectively, are transformed into animals for the majority of their on-screen time.

“Soul” film directors Pete Docter and Kemp Powers, along with producer Dana Murray were asked if they had any thoughts on the trend of Black characters not appearing human in an animated film's entirety.
Pete Docter said the team was initially unaware of the trope. Joe's time in the movie is split about evenly on Earth and in the "soul" world.
Co-director Kemp Powers (who identifies as Black) was brought in as a consultant and Co-Director as the animators had to create "caution cones" since it's the first time Pixar is "telling a Black man's story in an animated film."
Pixar has been working on "Soul" for about the past five years since the release of 2015's "Inside Out," which earned an Oscar.
Kemp Powers joined the film during its last two years of production. In an interview, Powers told the press that at the time he joined, the film was in "pretty rough form."

Soul animates the Black & Brown tribal counsel, aka “the Barbershop.”

Power’s contributions to “Soul” redeemed the movie’s ending, including more screen time for “Joe Gardner” on earth. In the final version of “Soul,” we see “Joe’s” connections to his real life on earth and a deeper backstory with his family. The Barbershop scene calls to the true to life importance of the neighborhood Black Barbershop. Although it is a small scene in the movie, the neighborhood Barbershop is where Black & Brown men connect with the community and their neighborhood brothers. The Barbershop for many Black & Brown men functions as the urban “Tribal counsel,” a place to exchange wisdom. That scene instantly connects with Black & Brown audiences as more than just a place for a haircut.

555761
Disney / Pixar

The heart and soul of the movie is Jazz music.
The character “Joe Gardner’s” piano performances in Soul were written and performed by Louisiana native musician Jon Batiste, bandleader and musical director on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert. Jon Batiste has recorded and performed with artists in various music genres (Stevie Wonder, Prince, Willie Nelson, Lenny Kravitz, Ed Sheeran, and Mavis Staples), released his recordings.
555762
Photo Credit (Amy Harris/Invision/AP/Shutterstock)
Jon Batiste is New Orleans music royalty, the Batiste family, including Lionel Batiste of the Treme Brass Band, Milton Batiste of the Olympia Brass Band, composer and arranger Harold Battiste, and Russell Batiste Jr.
The selection of Jon Batiste to write and perform the Jazz selections and the musical performances of the character “Joe Gardner” was a brilliant choice. Because Jon is known for his eclectic music that is often a smooth mixture of jazz, soul, R&B, and other soulful genres. Batiste was responsible for the Jazz compositions, and the arrangements heard throughout New York City

555763
Photo credit Disney
Grammy award-winning Jazz artist Herbie Hancock was consulted to ensure “Joe Garder’s” passion for Jazz was portrayed on screen with depth and sincerity.
Mr. Herbie Hancock added to the authenticity of Jazz music and its connection to the African American experience.

“Soul” is an enjoyable story featuring Disney / Pixar’s first Black male leading character.

Will Disney-Pixar's "Soul" be a Disney Classic for you and your family?
What Disney (live-action or animated) or Pixar movie is your favorite featuring people of color?
 
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AKL Ranger

Mouseketeer
Joined
Dec 7, 2009
Rodgers & Hammerstein's Cinderella

555764
Photo CREDIT: DANNY FELD/ABC

Diversity and Inclusion 1997
The Disney company's production of Rodgers and Hammerstein's Cinderella became a true classic, ahead of its time for the multi-racial, multi-ethnic casting. This was groundbreaking for casting African American pop star Brandy as Cinderella and Filipino-American actor Paolo Montalban as Prince Christopher. Brandy became the first African American to star as Cinderella. The rest of the cast was incredible.
Whitney Houston as Fairy Godmother
Brandy as Cinderella
Jason Alexander as Lionel
Whoopi Goldberg as Queen Constantina
Bernadette Peters as Stepmother
Veanne Cox as Calliope
Natalie Desselle as Minerva
Victor Garber as King Maximillian

555765
(Disney)
24 years later, the musical, co-starring Whoopi Goldberg, Jason Alexander, Bernadette Peters, Victor Garber, and Paolo Montalban as the charming Prince Christopher, is (finally) heading to Disney+
Rodgers & Hammerstein’s star-studded Cinderella starring Brandy in the title role will be available to stream on Disney+ starting at midnight on February 12.

This would make a family-friendly fun movie for a Watch Party. And it checks all of the boxes.
Disney, Cinderella ethnically diverse cast, and Brandy as the first official Black Cinderella ( that checks the Black History month box)
Post if our Watch Party will be Friday evening Feb 12, 2021, or Saturday, Feb 13, 2021 afternoon/evening?

Here is a way for you to watch the live-action Cinderella free online without signing up for Disney+. If you are a Verizon Wireless subscriber, you may be eligible for their “Disney+ on Us” deal, which gets you six months of Disney+ for free.

To read an interesting production story of the 1997 production of Rodgers and Hammerstein's Cinderella click the link below.
https://www.shondaland.com/inspire/a13138172/brandy-whitney-houston-oral-history-cinderella/
 

OKW Lover

Retired and living 2 miles from The Castle.
DIS Lifetime Sponsor
Joined
Apr 29, 2004
Somewhere above there is a post about the year of the ox. Wishing all my asian friends a happy new year.

I'm old. In my 70's. I grew up in the turbulent 60's. My biggest memory of this event occurred in 1968, in a land far away from where I grew up. Many, many were killed during Tet (the Vietnamese name for the new year celebration) that year. It galvanized, some would say polarized, our country. It played out on TV across the US. We all knew somebody that was sent there and got killed. Many of us growing up then realized that it could just as easily have been us over there fighting and dying. For me it was 3 years later and there I was.

At the time, those in the military weren't very welcome "back home". When I got out (early 1972) we were advised not to wear our uniform. We were seen as part of the problem - the Military/Industrial Establishment that needed wars.

OK, so this is long and rambling. I'm still trying to make sense of it all so many years later. A few positive things have happened.
1) Our service members are no longer scorned. It took me many, many years to openly admit that I was a Vietnam Veteran. Even today, when you talk to me it won't come up in the conversation. But I'm better at it now.
2) Oddly enough, my wife and I regularly go to have our nails done at a place that is run by Vietnamese, as are most of the nail salons around here in Central FL. I've had time to talk to them about their country. I've come to know them better. I even found myself wishing them a Happy Tet today. Something that never would have occurred to me back in 1968, or when I served a few years later.

So, I'm not quite sure what my point is here other than I hope everybody get some time to chat with those who's circumstances/environment/etc are different from our own and to learn something about each other.
 

Carol_

DIS Veteran
Joined
Aug 29, 2019
Rodgers & Hammerstein's Cinderella

View attachment 555764
Photo CREDIT: DANNY FELD/ABC

Diversity and Inclusion 1997
The Disney company's production of Rodgers and Hammerstein's Cinderella became a true classic, ahead of its time for the multi-racial, multi-ethnic casting. This was groundbreaking for casting African American pop star Brandy as Cinderella and Filipino-American actor Paolo Montalban as Prince Christopher. Brandy became the first African American to star as Cinderella. The rest of the cast was incredible.
Whitney Houston as Fairy Godmother
Brandy as Cinderella
Jason Alexander as Lionel
Whoopi Goldberg as Queen Constantina
Bernadette Peters as Stepmother
Veanne Cox as Calliope
Natalie Desselle as Minerva
Victor Garber as King Maximillian

View attachment 555765
(Disney)
24 years later, the musical, co-starring Whoopi Goldberg, Jason Alexander, Bernadette Peters, Victor Garber, and Paolo Montalban as the charming Prince Christopher, is (finally) heading to Disney+
Rodgers & Hammerstein’s star-studded Cinderella starring Brandy in the title role will be available to stream on Disney+ starting at midnight on February 12.

This would make a family-friendly fun movie for a Watch Party. And it checks all of the boxes.
Disney, Cinderella ethnically diverse cast, and Brandy as the first official Black Cinderella ( that checks the Black History month box)
Post if our Watch Party will be Friday evening Feb 12, 2021, or Saturday, Feb 13, 2021 afternoon/evening?

Here is a way for you to watch the live-action Cinderella free online without signing up for Disney+. If you are a Verizon Wireless subscriber, you may be eligible for their “Disney+ on Us” deal, which gets you six months of Disney+ for free.

To read an interesting production story of the 1997 production of Rodgers and Hammerstein's Cinderella click the link below.
https://www.shondaland.com/inspire/a13138172/brandy-whitney-houston-oral-history-cinderella/
I remember seeing this as a young adult and liking it. Because I was young, I had no idea why it would have been thought of as groundbreaking. It was just Cinderella, which is great no matter what.
 

AKL Ranger

Mouseketeer
Joined
Dec 7, 2009
Black History month is a celebration of Black history in America, and everyone is welcomed to celebrate.
558146
Check out this artical that highlights Black history is a part of our American history.“Black History Month is a celebration of Black brilliance, community values and commitments to justice that are lived out 365 days a year.”

https://www.cnn.com/2021/02/21/health/how-to-celebrate-black-history-month-wellness/index.html

From ”The Archive” site, an article featuring
29 Facts About Black History That You Might Not Know
Celebrate the African American men and women who made history.
https://explorethearchive.com/black-history-month-facts

How are you and your families engaging in the discussion of Black American history, during Black History month?
 
  • Punkrockbebop

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    May 6, 2017
    AKL Ranger, your lovely sunny personality really comes through in your posts. I think your DOC forum is such a great idea and I hope it is implemented. I’ll be so interested to read along and follow, and it will be great to learn from each other.

    By the way, reading your posts about Animal Kingdom and Animal Kindgom Lodge....AKL is my favorite resort, and Animal Kingdom is such a great park! The food is far superior to all the other locations and parks, and I absolutely love the theming and the feat of design of the building, and the huge African art collection and the animals. I also love that the cast members are actually from Africa and always like to chat with us and tell us about the region where they are from and the history and culture. Furthermore, Animal Kingdom has all the best vegetarian and gluten free options out of all the parks and the healthiest food, too. Anyone who says there isn’t anything to eat there has to be joking, or just have an extremely limited palate, or something! I mean, come on, the options are very diverse and there’s something for everyone.

    I love that we see more DOC in AKL and AK, and it’s refreshing to see more diversity.

    Another thing I wanted to mention is we are fans of Mark Daniel who is killing it lately as the main Disney Parks emcee, announcer, and voice actor, and we’ve been following his career since seeing him emcee at NY Comic-Con early on in his career, then at Star Wars Celebration and the Star Wars weekends at DHS. It’s been really cool to see his trajectory and success within the Walt Disney company and they use him for everything, now. Pretty cool.
     

    Alicenwonderment

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Mar 21, 2011
    Somewhere above there is a post about the year of the ox. Wishing all my asian friends a happy new year.

    I'm old. In my 70's. I grew up in the turbulent 60's. My biggest memory of this event occurred in 1968, in a land far away from where I grew up. Many, many were killed during Tet (the Vietnamese name for the new year celebration) that year. It galvanized, some would say polarized, our country. It played out on TV across the US. We all knew somebody that was sent there and got killed. Many of us growing up then realized that it could just as easily have been us over there fighting and dying. For me it was 3 years later and there I was.

    At the time, those in the military weren't very welcome "back home". When I got out (early 1972) we were advised not to wear our uniform. We were seen as part of the problem - the Military/Industrial Establishment that needed wars.

    OK, so this is long and rambling. I'm still trying to make sense of it all so many years later. A few positive things have happened.
    1) Our service members are no longer scorned. It took me many, many years to openly admit that I was a Vietnam Veteran. Even today, when you talk to me it won't come up in the conversation. But I'm better at it now.
    2) Oddly enough, my wife and I regularly go to have our nails done at a place that is run by Vietnamese, as are most of the nail salons around here in Central FL. I've had time to talk to them about their country. I've come to know them better. I even found myself wishing them a Happy Tet today. Something that never would have occurred to me back in 1968, or when I served a few years later.

    So, I'm not quite sure what my point is here other than I hope everybody get some time to chat with those who's circumstances/environment/etc are different from our own and to learn something about each other.
    Thank you for your service. My father also served in Vietnam. We actually have a painting that was given to his parents in my dad's honor. My dad worked in psy ops. Growing up he would show his slides but really didn't say much about it. (I'm not even sure where the slides are now.) I know he did enjoy the country and the people. He also mentioned how badly they were treated when they came back home.
     

    PollyannaMom

    I was a click-clack champ!!
    Joined
    May 16, 2006
    “Soul" is the latest in a string of animated movies ("The Princess and the Frog," "Spies in Disguise," "The Emperor's New Groove") that borders on the edge of the troupe where Black or people of color in leading human characters are transformed into animals or non-human characters/creatures for a majority of their on-screen time. This style of representation evolved into s stereotypical troupe.
    The act of taking away nonwhite characters’ racial identities dates back as far as the early 2000s. In Disney’s “The Emperor’s New Groove” (2000) and “Brother Bear” (2003), native Incan and Alaskan Native American characters, respectively, are transformed into animals for the majority of their on-screen time.
    This is why I read here! I never would have put that pattern together, and it's so obvious now. Thank you for posting about it, and I'll definitely pay more attention to it going forward.
     

    Tonyz

    How do ya do? Pretty good, sure as you're born!
    Joined
    May 17, 2014
    Hello everyone! I haven't been around too much lately but in honor of Black History Month (and as a big film buff) I want to share 10 essential American films by black directors. These include films ranging from modern-day big-budget, to neo-realistic, horror, drama, comedy, dialogue heavy, music-heavy, and even all the way back to the silent era.

    Definitely something for everyone to enjoy!

    (chronological order starting from the latest)

    1. Black Panther (2018) - Ryan Coogler
    2. Get Out (2017) - Jordan Peele
    3. Moonlight (2016) - Barry Jenkins
    4. The Watermelon Woman (1996) - Cheryl Dunye
    5. Boyz n the Hood (1991) - John Singleton
    6. Daughters of the Dust (1991) - Julie Dash
    7. Do the Right Thing (1989) - Spike Lee
    8. Killer of Sheep (1978) - Charles Burnett
    9. Shaft (1971) - Gordon Parks
    10. Within Our Gates (1920) - Oscar Micheaux
     
  • AKL Ranger

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    Dec 7, 2009
    From the Walt Disney World resort twitter feed

    559001 . “This #BlackHistory Month we’re celebrating the contributions of Black individuals. Today’s sneak peek at a feature on Djuan Rivers, VP of Disney’s Animal Kingdom, previews his career journey and travels. Head to the My Disney Experience app tomorrow for more!”
     

    AKL Ranger

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    Dec 7, 2009
    Walt Disney World just Tweeted
    ”We celebrated #BlackHistoryMonth by sharing stories, contributions and voices of Black cast members across our company. Full recap of the month-long celebrations here:“ http://di.sn/6016HYFfp

    559179

    Throughout February, we recognized #BlackHistoryMonth, also now known as “Black History Always” by sharing stories about the incredible contributions, accomplishments and voices of Black cast members across Disney.

    559182

    559183
     

    sweetpeama

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Nov 30, 2013

    AKL Ranger

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    Dec 7, 2009

    kylenne

    Wakandan-American
    Joined
    Oct 16, 2016
    Offering this here for discussion, because I frankly don’t trust the Resorts board not to get out of pocket, and I really feel a way and need to vent to people who understand.

    Theme Park Express is one of my fave Disney vloggers and he posted a video today of his experience checking into the Grand Floridian villas, he and his gf were gifted a stay by a subscriber who had a ton of expiring DVC points.

    I bring it up here because dude is a visibly brown man, and his literal first experience with this resort was pulling up in his car, getting the bags out and searching for a luggage cart while a nearby female CM totally ignored him, talking to another guest. So he went inside to be greeted by a well dressed male CM (I’m assuming the CMs that sometimes hang around the lobby with iPads, guessing from previous stays elsewhere), who asked if he could help him, and vlogger dude said that he needed a luggage cart. The CM told him the female CM outside was supposed to assist with that sort of thing and so they went outside together to see her, and when the male CM asked her why she didn’t assist, homegirl literally said she thought vlogger guy was just delivering groceries. Mind you, he was obviously pulling luggage out of his car, he had a t-shirt with the name of his YouTube channel on it and had a camera.

    This incident especially stands out to me because not 2 days ago I was watching another cool Disney vlogger I subscribe to, Jackie over on SuperEnthused, also do a video where she stayed at the GFV thanks to a generous subscriber who gave her DVC points they couldn’t use. Needless to say nobody was mistaking this bleached blonde white girl for Instacart on her video.

    So. That was his initial impression. And then later on in the video, at the pool, he mentioned being the darkest man there, and the vibe from guests being That Way that most any POC who has ever been in a predominately white space knows all too well. His gf is white as well and I’m sure that did not help anything. My heart broke for him, and it made me angry for him. The fact that he titled this video “we don’t belong here!” broke my heart even more. I have fought all my life against that mentality

    Like, I have talked about this before, as a dark skinned woc who pretty much only stays at Deluxes (aside from a stay at POFQ). I am used to that vibe. I got the same stares hanging around the Poly with my own gf who is also white, though in our case being an obviously queer couple was also a strike against us with these lowkey bigots--my gf is very gender nonconforming and identifies as butch and while I am nonbinary I am a femme and very much read as a woman. I talked about our experience with other guests, the thinly veiled hostility we felt in the women’s lounge at the GF Senses. People like us are not supposed to be in these spaces, according to the narrow minded, and being a triple minority the way I am you feel it even more. I have been that Black woman mistaken for “the help”. I have had other guests give me the hairy eyeball while walking with a coverup and my mug. To put it plainly there are too many who think poc and Black people specifically can’t afford nice things. Even Nice People(tm) have rather poorly contained their shock when we talk and they discover how well-traveled I am.

    I mean, I have an extremely thick skin for this sort of thing, mainly because I’ve been exposed to this kind of garbage from literal childhood and I know how to handle it. I know how to navigate fancy mostly white spaces and I never ever let anyone make me feel like I don’t belong somewhere. But even with all of that, quite frankly this was not the sort of thing I wanted to see 2 months before I check in for my first ever GF stay. Like I said I am used to it from other guests at Deluxes, but I have never gotten that kind of attitude from CMs at those resorts. It makes me question my choices, especially since this is my first time going anywhere much less WDW since the pandemic started, and encountering racist CMs when I’m trying to enjoy a milestone birthday (quite possibly alone) and surviving all this mess would just be too much.
     

    TheMaxRebo

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jan 12, 2008
    Offering this here for discussion, because I frankly don’t trust the Resorts board not to get out of pocket, and I really feel a way and need to vent to people who understand.

    Theme Park Express is one of my fave Disney vloggers and he posted a video today of his experience checking into the Grand Floridian villas, he and his gf were gifted a stay by a subscriber who had a ton of expiring DVC points.

    I bring it up here because dude is a visibly brown man, and his literal first experience with this resort was pulling up in his car, getting the bags out and searching for a luggage cart while a nearby female CM totally ignored him, talking to another guest. So he went inside to be greeted by a well dressed male CM (I’m assuming the CMs that sometimes hang around the lobby with iPads, guessing from previous stays elsewhere), who asked if he could help him, and vlogger dude said that he needed a luggage cart. The CM told him the female CM outside was supposed to assist with that sort of thing and so they went outside together to see her, and when the male CM asked her why she didn’t assist, homegirl literally said she thought vlogger guy was just delivering groceries. Mind you, he was obviously pulling luggage out of his car, he had a t-shirt with the name of his YouTube channel on it and had a camera.

    This incident especially stands out to me because not 2 days ago I was watching another cool Disney vlogger I subscribe to, Jackie over on SuperEnthused, also do a video where she stayed at the GFV thanks to a generous subscriber who gave her DVC points they couldn’t use. Needless to say nobody was mistaking this bleached blonde white girl for Instacart on her video.

    So. That was his initial impression. And then later on in the video, at the pool, he mentioned being the darkest man there, and the vibe from guests being That Way that most any POC who has ever been in a predominately white space knows all too well. His gf is white as well and I’m sure that did not help anything. My heart broke for him, and it made me angry for him. The fact that he titled this video “we don’t belong here!” broke my heart even more. I have fought all my life against that mentality

    Like, I have talked about this before, as a dark skinned woc who pretty much only stays at Deluxes (aside from a stay at POFQ). I am used to that vibe. I got the same stares hanging around the Poly with my own gf who is also white, though in our case being an obviously queer couple was also a strike against us with these lowkey bigots--my gf is very gender nonconforming and identifies as butch and while I am nonbinary I am a femme and very much read as a woman. I talked about our experience with other guests, the thinly veiled hostility we felt in the women’s lounge at the GF Senses. People like us are not supposed to be in these spaces, according to the narrow minded, and being a triple minority the way I am you feel it even more. I have been that Black woman mistaken for “the help”. I have had other guests give me the hairy eyeball while walking with a coverup and my mug. To put it plainly there are too many who think poc and Black people specifically can’t afford nice things. Even Nice People(tm) have rather poorly contained their shock when we talk and they discover how well-traveled I am.

    I mean, I have an extremely thick skin for this sort of thing, mainly because I’ve been exposed to this kind of garbage from literal childhood and I know how to handle it. I know how to navigate fancy mostly white spaces and I never ever let anyone make me feel like I don’t belong somewhere. But even with all of that, quite frankly this was not the sort of thing I wanted to see 2 months before I check in for my first ever GF stay. Like I said I am used to it from other guests at Deluxes, but I have never gotten that kind of attitude from CMs at those resorts. It makes me question my choices, especially since this is my first time going anywhere much less WDW since the pandemic started, and encountering racist CMs when I’m trying to enjoy a milestone birthday (quite possibly alone) and surviving all this mess would just be too much.
    Not really sure what to say as I can't identify with what you have to deal with but will say it sucks and is sad and makes me upset and angry and is just another reminder of the privilege I have to not have to worry about things like this.

    I do truly hope that was an exception with that CM and your trip will be nothing short of consistently wonderful
     

    808blessing

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    Dec 5, 2020
    That’s the Ugh in ugly racism in present and past times. :( I can validate with many experiences where people do not expect nor think I deserve the experiences I am having because of assumptions. It’s subtle to most but real. If you are lurking and know it is real, or starting to wonder if it is-consider doing something new. Don’t just be a silent observer or wonderer. Figure out what you can do to end it - do your small part- or racism will continue in future times.
     

    Lindsey17

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    Oct 11, 2018
    Offering this here for discussion, because I frankly don’t trust the Resorts board not to get out of pocket, and I really feel a way and need to vent to people who understand.

    Theme Park Express is one of my fave Disney vloggers and he posted a video today of his experience checking into the Grand Floridian villas, he and his gf were gifted a stay by a subscriber who had a ton of expiring DVC points.

    I bring it up here because dude is a visibly brown man, and his literal first experience with this resort was pulling up in his car, getting the bags out and searching for a luggage cart while a nearby female CM totally ignored him, talking to another guest. So he went inside to be greeted by a well dressed male CM (I’m assuming the CMs that sometimes hang around the lobby with iPads, guessing from previous stays elsewhere), who asked if he could help him, and vlogger dude said that he needed a luggage cart. The CM told him the female CM outside was supposed to assist with that sort of thing and so they went outside together to see her, and when the male CM asked her why she didn’t assist, homegirl literally said she thought vlogger guy was just delivering groceries. Mind you, he was obviously pulling luggage out of his car, he had a t-shirt with the name of his YouTube channel on it and had a camera.

    This incident especially stands out to me because not 2 days ago I was watching another cool Disney vlogger I subscribe to, Jackie over on SuperEnthused, also do a video where she stayed at the GFV thanks to a generous subscriber who gave her DVC points they couldn’t use. Needless to say nobody was mistaking this bleached blonde white girl for Instacart on her video.

    So. That was his initial impression. And then later on in the video, at the pool, he mentioned being the darkest man there, and the vibe from guests being That Way that most any POC who has ever been in a predominately white space knows all too well. His gf is white as well and I’m sure that did not help anything. My heart broke for him, and it made me angry for him. The fact that he titled this video “we don’t belong here!” broke my heart even more. I have fought all my life against that mentality

    Like, I have talked about this before, as a dark skinned woc who pretty much only stays at Deluxes (aside from a stay at POFQ). I am used to that vibe. I got the same stares hanging around the Poly with my own gf who is also white, though in our case being an obviously queer couple was also a strike against us with these lowkey bigots--my gf is very gender nonconforming and identifies as butch and while I am nonbinary I am a femme and very much read as a woman. I talked about our experience with other guests, the thinly veiled hostility we felt in the women’s lounge at the GF Senses. People like us are not supposed to be in these spaces, according to the narrow minded, and being a triple minority the way I am you feel it even more. I have been that Black woman mistaken for “the help”. I have had other guests give me the hairy eyeball while walking with a coverup and my mug. To put it plainly there are too many who think poc and Black people specifically can’t afford nice things. Even Nice People(tm) have rather poorly contained their shock when we talk and they discover how well-traveled I am.

    I mean, I have an extremely thick skin for this sort of thing, mainly because I’ve been exposed to this kind of garbage from literal childhood and I know how to handle it. I know how to navigate fancy mostly white spaces and I never ever let anyone make me feel like I don’t belong somewhere. But even with all of that, quite frankly this was not the sort of thing I wanted to see 2 months before I check in for my first ever GF stay. Like I said I am used to it from other guests at Deluxes, but I have never gotten that kind of attitude from CMs at those resorts. It makes me question my choices, especially since this is my first time going anywhere much less WDW since the pandemic started, and encountering racist CMs when I’m trying to enjoy a milestone birthday (quite possibly alone) and surviving all this mess would just be too much.

    I don't know what to say other than sorry and I hope you have nothing, but good CM interactions for your birthday trip. I sometimes can't believe the things I'm hearing or reading are events that are happening today.

    Although it has to be tiring to constantly have to educate white people, I so appreciate people telling their stories and pointing out the subtle racism that I otherwise would miss. My eyes have been opened so much over the last year and I want to thank every POC poster here for sharing/posting.
     

    GAN

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jul 18, 2005
    It's sad that anyone should feel that way in public. Unfortunately, with whatever progress that has been made a lot still needs to be done. Let's hope people in future generations benefit from the slow, hard work being done today. Then to add the Oprah interview not long after watching the Theme Park Express piece was even worse...
     

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