D.O.C.'s = Dis'ers of Color (Disney Fans of Color)

Would you like a dedicated/featured Forum for D.O.C.'s Dis'ers Of Color & Allies


  • Total voters
    208

lovethesun12

DIS Veteran
Joined
Jul 5, 2017
Just popping in to say when politicians threaten the jury and weigh in on a verdict prior to the verdict being handed down, was not a very good day for justice, because at the very least it opens the door for the verdict being over turned.
As long as any judge or juror involved in this case has the gift of vision it will never be overturned.
 

Tonyz

How do ya do? Pretty good, sure as you're born!
Joined
May 17, 2014
Just popping in to say when politicians threaten the jury and weigh in on a verdict prior to the verdict being handed down, was not a very good day for justice, because at the very least it opens the door for the verdict being over turned.
Not surprising in the slightest that you have this take, unfortunately.
 

JodieJRanch

Earning My Ears
Joined
Mar 11, 2021
As long as any judge or juror involved in this case has the gift of vision it will never be overturned.
VISION? Justice is blind, or at least it supposed to be. Listen, the dude was/is bad. If an appeals court doesn't overturn the verdict, he needs to be stood up in front of a firing squad immediately and taken care of. I'll be the first to volunteer for the squad.
 

Welsh_Dragon

Registered
Joined
Feb 23, 2019
VISION? Justice is blind, or at least it supposed to be.
The ‘justice is blind’ quote and the oft portrayal of Lady Justice with a blindfold does not suggest that evidence is not examined/ looked at; it symbolises impartiality, the ideal that justice should be applied without regard to wealth, power, or other status. Indeed, the scales represent the weighing of evidence. The scales lack a foundation in order to signify that evidence should stand on its own.
It is a pity that politicians did not hold their silence during the trial and that the civil settlement was made public, but the ability of this jury to ignore and not be influenced by outside ‘noise’ must surely have been considered during voir dire.
The Old Bailey ‘Lady Justice’ does not wear a blindfold because she is an innocent maiden, not yet corrupted by the world.
 

Lindsey17

Mouseketeer
Joined
Oct 11, 2018
Just popping in to say it's a very good day for justice in this country.

I felt sick to my stomach waiting for the verdict. It's really sad that we all questioned that the right outcome would happen. The worst part is that celebrating or the small victory was cut short as another person of color lost their life at the hands of police. The only thing that makes me hopeful that they'll maybe think twice before reaching for their gun is that one of them was finally held accountable, that they're not above the law and that better training will start happening. I'm not that naïve to think it's going to happen over night or that this verdict changes everything, but it's something.
 

AKL Ranger

Mouseketeer
Joined
Dec 7, 2009
577745
On Wednesday, Howard University announced that it has named its newly reestablished College of Fine Arts after one of its most famous alumni: the late actor Chadwick Boseman.

Earlier this month, Howard actor and alumnus Phylicia Rashad as the dean of the fine arts school.

Boseman was a proud Howard alumnus, and was the university's commencement speaker in 2018. Privately, he was already battling colon cancer. He died last August at age 43.

"When you are deciding on next steps, next jobs, next careers, further education, you should rather find purpose than a job or a career," he told the graduating students. "Purpose crosses disciplines. Purpose is an essential element of you. It is the reason you are on the planet at this particular time in history."

Your AKL Ranger,
keeping Jambo House safe from poachers 🦁 🇰🇪 🦓
 
  • kylenne

    Wakandan-American
    Joined
    Oct 16, 2016
    View attachment 577745
    On Wednesday, Howard University announced that it has named its newly reestablished College of Fine Arts after one of its most famous alumni: the late actor Chadwick Boseman.

    Earlier this month, Howard actor and alumnus Phylicia Rashad as the dean of the fine arts school.

    Boseman was a proud Howard alumnus, and was the university's commencement speaker in 2018. Privately, he was already battling colon cancer. He died last August at age 43.

    "When you are deciding on next steps, next jobs, next careers, further education, you should rather find purpose than a job or a career," he told the graduating students. "Purpose crosses disciplines. Purpose is an essential element of you. It is the reason you are on the planet at this particular time in history."

    Your AKL Ranger,
    keeping Jambo House safe from poachers 🦁 🇰🇪 🦓
    What a beautiful honor. I miss Chad so much.
     

    808blessing

    👑 of 🏰
    Joined
    Dec 5, 2020
    Here’s a map of states that are restricting racism education efforts and states that are expanding.Sad to see Hawaii and Alaska with large indigenous population to be silent so far.
    You may have heard what Florida did this past week cutting off teacher autonomy. In my opinion if they ban critical race theory ok but then many teachers on the fence may take it to mean they can’t talk about race at all. Which is Yes, it is controversial but I feel in education, especially high school needs to learn about pain points, issues and history. We should have been taking ethnic studies rather than a language in high school. Google translate is a technical solution but having empathy and embracing many cultures is only being learned at home right now. My only comforting thought is that the first thing teens do when something is banned is look it up.

     
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    JodieJRanch

    Earning My Ears
    Joined
    Mar 11, 2021
    Here’s a map of states that are restricting racism education efforts and states that are expanding.Sad to see Hawaii and Alaska with large indigenous population to be silent so far.
    You may have heard what Florida did this past week cutting off teacher autonomy. In my opinion if they ban critical race theory ok but then many teachers on the fence may take it to mean they can’t talk about race at all. Which is Yes, it is controversial but I feel in education, especially high school needs to learn about pain points, issues and history. We should have been taking ethnic studies rather than a language in high school. Google translate is a technical solution but having empathy and embracing many cultures is only being learned at home right now. My only comforting thought is that the first thing teens do when something is banned is look it up.

    First of all, you have to have systemic racism to make racism education necessary and IMO, it doesn't exist at all. AT ALL. The people pushing this concept are doing so primarily to divide this country and for political expedience (to get people out to vote). So far, they have succeeded beyond their wildest dreams. Even if systemic racism existed, such "education" or indoctrination would have to be highly scrutinized and balanced. As it is now from everything I've read, the basis of such "training" has been to teach that the whiteness of ones skin makes them inherently racist. This load of garbage should be banned. People from all ethnicities can be racist. Blaming a race for holding one back is just the easy way to get through life. It's not my fault. It's someone else's fault or the fault of another race. This kind of thinking is dangerous and will end up destroying this country. Unfortunately, destroying this country is the primary goal for many of the people promoting this insanity.
     
  • Tiggerette

    DIS Veteran
    DVC Gold
    Joined
    Jun 30, 2013
    First of all, you have to have systemic racism to make racism education necessary and IMO, it doesn't exist at all. AT ALL. .... As it is now from everything I've read, ......
    Instead of reading, consider the value of lived experience. Those who have been subject to systemic racism can speak most directly to its existence. We can learn innumerable lessons from those who live in it on a day-to-day basis. We don't need to confirm, deny, approve, disapprove. Simply listen. Listen and thereby, Learn. :cutie:
     

    JodieJRanch

    Earning My Ears
    Joined
    Mar 11, 2021
    Instead of reading, consider the value of lived experience. Those who have been subject to systemic racism can speak most directly to its existence. We can learn innumerable lessons from those who live in it on a day-to-day basis. We don't need to confirm, deny, approve, disapprove. Simply listen. Listen and thereby, Learn. :cutie:
    Instead of reading, consider the value of lived experience. Those who have been subject to systemic racism can speak most directly to its existence. We can learn innumerable lessons from those who live in it on a day-to-day basis. We don't need to confirm, deny, approve, disapprove. Simply listen. Listen and thereby, Learn. :cutie:
    It's a lot more than reading. It's seeing and listening and specifically understanding motivations as well. There are multiple books written primarily in the 1960's that are a blue print for exactly what is going on today. One for example, "A Matter of Control" by J. E. Solinski. This book details the ways to accomplish a political objective, one of which is to divide the country in as many ways possible, race included. Understanding the motivations of the people behind all of this is the key.
     
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    JodieJRanch

    Earning My Ears
    Joined
    Mar 11, 2021
    Instead of reading, consider the value of lived experience. Those who have been subject to systemic racism can speak most directly to its existence. We can learn innumerable lessons from those who live in it on a day-to-day basis. We don't need to confirm, deny, approve, disapprove. Simply listen. Listen and thereby, Learn. :cutie:
    I'm not going to argue that racism doesn't exist. YES it does exist. Is it systemic? In my opinion absolutely not.
     

    JodieJRanch

    Earning My Ears
    Joined
    Mar 11, 2021
    @JodieJRanch Have you ready any academic papers to share and not just a self published book from a white woman that has a blog?
    If you're asking if I have a college degree. Yes, 2. In college, I had to regurgitate what the professors wanted to hear for a grade. I have a brain of my own though. I don't need someone to tell me what to believe. I have very little respect for academia especially given that most therein have a biased agenda.
     

    ambellina

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    Oct 29, 2015
    @JodieJRanch I was not asking if you had a college degree. I was asking if you had any academic papers to share that prove your opinion. Seems that you don't, and also don't want to go through the effort of looking for any. Thanks for showing the rest of us who you are. :smooth:
     

    OKW Lover

    Retired and living 2 miles from The Castle.
    DIS Lifetime Sponsor
    Joined
    Apr 29, 2004
    Instead of reading, consider the value of lived experience. Those who have been subject to systemic racism can speak most directly to its existence. We can learn innumerable lessons from those who live in it on a day-to-day basis. We don't need to confirm, deny, approve, disapprove. Simply listen. Listen and thereby, Learn. :cutie:
    Well said. Having grown up (and old) as a white male there is no way I can understand what some people have had to live with all their lives. I can only read historic accounts - and hope that they themselves have not been skewed.
     

    JodieJRanch

    Earning My Ears
    Joined
    Mar 11, 2021
    @JodieJRanch Have you ready any academic papers to share and not just a self published book from a white woman that has a blog?
    First of all, I do not believe her book was self published and second of all, therein lies the problem. Your response "a white women". Who cares what color the author is. I believe some serious self introspective analysis needs to be done here.
     

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