Sick time

lowlight

DIS Veteran
Joined
Feb 12, 2022
I agree for the most part.
But at what point does our supervisor not bring in the attendance review? We do have a policy on this. I think this is what irritates me - the supervisor not the workers. Supervisor says nada - just "feel better".

And it is totally my issue but I wish the fact that I was covering for everyone was acknowledged. It's for sure coming up in my annual review!

The unfortunate reality of work life is that those who do rarely get recognized for it. The key to success in most places I've worked is not a strong work ethic and strict adherence to company policy, it's a weird mix of politics and a popularity contest. A mentor told me when I started, "kid, you're just a number to them". It took me almost a decade to realize he was right. Managers are the same as us, just trying to get through the day with as little headache as possible. A manager thanking you for your hard work is really just saying "thank you for not adding to my shoot pile this morning". When you pick up your coworkers slack, it is not adding to your managers pile, so they don't care that your coworker is taking more sick days than you. Once you realize this, work life gets better because you don't care how many sick days your coworker takes, because you aren't picking up their slack regardless. I'm sure some people are going to say they are appreciated at their job, and maybe they are, so to those lucky few- congratulations while it lasts.
 

aprilgail

DIS Veteran
Joined
Nov 10, 2001
How much sick time do you use? My closest coworker is now on day 16 (not consecutive!) of sick days for the calendar year. I've taken one so far in 2022.
She also just got back from 2 weeks holidays.
If staff were taking excessive sick time (yes it's paid) would your employer say anything?
She's not the only one - also have 2 others that have taken quite a bit this year as well.

Just frustrating when you are the only one consecutively here!
We got 12 sick days per year and I took every single one every year and some years took more. My work was not my life- if I had something at my kids school or my daughter was sick I would take off.
 

CdnCarrie

DIS Veteran
Joined
Aug 17, 2009
We got 12 sick days per year and I took every single one every year and some years took more. My work was not my life- if I had something at my kids school or my daughter was sick I would take off.
I would only use sick time if actually sick. If I wanted to do something with the kids I would use vacation day.
Yes when kids were younger I did sometimes say I was sick when it was the kids to get paid.
 

CdnCarrie

DIS Veteran
Joined
Aug 17, 2009
The unfortunate reality of work life is that those who do rarely get recognized for it. The key to success in most places I've worked is not a strong work ethic and strict adherence to company policy, it's a weird mix of politics and a popularity contest. A mentor told me when I started, "kid, you're just a number to them". It took me almost a decade to realize he was right. Managers are the same as us, just trying to get through the day with as little headache as possible. A manager thanking you for your hard work is really just saying "thank you for not adding to my shoot pile this morning". When you pick up your coworkers slack, it is not adding to your managers pile, so they don't care that your coworker is taking more sick days than you. Once you realize this, work life gets better because you don't care how many sick days your coworker takes, because you aren't picking up their slack regardless. I'm sure some people are going to say they are appreciated at their job, and maybe they are, so to those lucky few- congratulations while it lasts.
This exactly. Just lots of sick time around me right now so I'm crabby.
 

sam_gordon

DIS Veteran
Joined
Jun 26, 2010
The unfortunate reality of work life is that those who do rarely get recognized for it. The key to success in most places I've worked is not a strong work ethic and strict adherence to company policy, it's a weird mix of politics and a popularity contest. A mentor told me when I started, "kid, you're just a number to them". It took me almost a decade to realize he was right. Managers are the same as us, just trying to get through the day with as little headache as possible. A manager thanking you for your hard work is really just saying "thank you for not adding to my shoot pile this morning". When you pick up your coworkers slack, it is not adding to your managers pile, so they don't care that your coworker is taking more sick days than you. Once you realize this, work life gets better because you don't care how many sick days your coworker takes, because you aren't picking up their slack regardless. I'm sure some people are going to say they are appreciated at their job, and maybe they are, so to those lucky few- congratulations while it lasts.
My company (I'm assuming corporate wide) has been on a big push to make sure employees feel appreciated. Free lunches/ice cream truck one day/quarterly awards/personal notes from the (local) VP/etc.
 

lowlight

DIS Veteran
Joined
Feb 12, 2022
My company (I'm assuming corporate wide) has been on a big push to make sure employees feel appreciated. Free lunches/ice cream truck one day/quarterly awards/personal notes from the (local) VP/etc.

That's awesome, but in my case at least, I'm not sure a free bomb pop is going to make me feel better for being passed up on a promotion after working 60 hour weeks for years because Janet booped the boss and so she was suddenly a better prospect for the promotion (true story, names changed to protect the innocent). I guess what I'm saying is they can do things to make working conditions better like pizza trucks and bouncy house recess time, but they will never actually appreciate any work you do because you're just a replaceable number to them. Again, just my opinion and my own healthy cynicism of any altruistic gesture by a company.
 

ronandannette

I gave myself this tag and I "Like" myself too!
Joined
May 4, 2006
How much sick time do you use? My closest coworker is now on day 16 (not consecutive!) of sick days for the calendar year. I've taken one so far in 2022.
She also just got back from 2 weeks holidays.
If staff were taking excessive sick time (yes it's paid) would your employer say anything?
She's not the only one - also have 2 others that have taken quite a bit this year as well.

Just frustrating when you are the only one consecutively here!
We get 7 paid sick days per year; they do not roll over. As sucky as that seems, it greatly exceeds the province's minimum labour standard, which is 5 days unpaid. Our employment agreements are extremely specific in their wording but we are given discretion at the direct supervisory level. I've officially taken 3 this year (all for legitimate illness; no Covid thank goodness) but my boss would give me many more if I needed them. It was very challenging during peak Covid times. Positive test results were mandatory to report to HR and there were mandatory isolation requirement in Alberta for 2 years. Having Covid meant burning all your sick days and having to take the remainder either as vacation or unpaid. We typically fudged it at the department level but for the unfortunate few that tested positive twice, the second instance was all on them.

With my own current staff, it's all about their past performance and whether or not they're actually sick. I've got a stellar group right now and would never question any one of them, but it's not always been that way in the past. If need be, I could (as per the employment agreement) require medical verification after two consecutive days, force them into vacation time or unpaid leave or decline the days outright which would make their absence grounds for termination. With past experiences, the employees that pushed boundaries to this extent were already unsatisfactory performers and neither of them work here anymore.
I agree for the most part.
But at what point does our supervisor not bring in the attendance review? We do have a policy on this. I think this is what irritates me - the supervisor not the workers. Supervisor says nada - just "feel better".

And it is totally my issue but I wish the fact that I was covering for everyone was acknowledged. It's for sure coming up in my annual review!
:flower3: You don't work for me but I'll thank you anyway. It is a NIGHTMARE at my workplace (especially this time of year) to cover vacation relief or leave of any kind for more than a day or two. Myself and the remaining staff kill ourselves to keep the wheels on. One thing that also irks me beyond tolerance is a staff member returning from holidays or sick leave and complaining that their tasks have accumulated. :mad: We can scrape by, but if we could entirely do your job without you here, I wouldn't need you here, now would I?!?
They do not have sick family members and even if they do we do not have family sick time.
We don't have personal days or family sick time either. There's some provision for longer-term compassionate situations through EI but nothing for just a day or two here or there. Makes it very difficult for parents of younger kids or those with elderly or infirm parents. Blessedly, I'm no longer in either of those categories myself.
 

sam_gordon

DIS Veteran
Joined
Jun 26, 2010
That's awesome, but in my case at least, I'm not sure a free bomb pop is going to make me feel better for being passed up on a promotion after working 60 hour weeks for years because Janet booped the boss and so she was suddenly a better prospect for the promotion (true story, names changed to protect the innocent). I guess what I'm saying is they can do things to make working conditions better like pizza trucks and bouncy house recess time, but they will never actually appreciate any work you do because you're just a replaceable number to them. Again, just my opinion and my own healthy cynicism of any altruistic gesture by a company.
The problem is you're painting EVERY company with a broad brush based on your experience. Yes, there are times employees are just "numbers". There are also times employers (in every step of the ladder) DO appreciate employees.
 

lowlight

DIS Veteran
Joined
Feb 12, 2022
The problem is you're painting EVERY company with a broad brush based on your experience. Yes, there are times employees are just "numbers". There are also times employers (in every step of the ladder) DO appreciate employees.
That’s a fair judgment, one I expressed myself in a previous post.
 

rigs32

DIS Veteran
Joined
Dec 3, 2001
I really thought that covid would have changed the culture around using sick time and staying home when ill. I had to return to work after I was done with my 5 day quarantine, but I was miserable and not very productive the next week. I now see so many people back to the old ways of working in the office regardless of their condition and it means we're all getting sick routinely just like before covid. I can only wait until the start of school and covid starts flying around again, especially since my lingering symptoms from my first go round are still present.
 

Praying Colonel

DIS Veteran
Joined
Aug 16, 2004
I earn 104 hours of sick leave per year and I've used 16 so far this year.

I don't like to use it unless I might be contagious to others or I have a medical/dental appointment. I was in a bad accident a few years ago and I was off work for 4 months. Thank goodness I had substantial leave time saved up or it would've been a lot tougher for us. I might've been able to go on short-term disability but would've drawn a smaller % of my take-home pay.

I encourage my staff to stay home if they're sick. I don't want to get what they've got. :D
 
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Travel60

DIS Veteran
Joined
Feb 8, 2012
What does the employee handbook say? Most places allow a certain number of days as PTO then it starts coming from vacation then not paid.

I do not recall ever taking sick time off for myself (I'm seldom sick) but did have to take a few days with each kid's primary grade illnesses in. DH and i took turns and once hired a private duty nurse because DD was no longer really sick but couldn't go back for 5 days (chicken pox).
 

amcnj

DIS Veteran
Joined
Sep 10, 1999
Over the years I worked in a variety of places with vastly different sick leave policies and allowances. Some made it known through company culture that taking sick days was frowned upon. Some did not care, or at least did nothing about excessive absences, so some employees used up all their time quickly each year and then moved onto unpaid leaves. Another place tracked it all and disciplined for patterns, such as if the employee tended to call out sick the day before or after a holiday or on Mondays or Fridays.

There were also varying requirements so far as medical notes. Some wanted one for any time you were out after say the first three days each year, others for each occurrence where you were out more than a certain number of consecutive days.
 

CdnCarrie

DIS Veteran
Joined
Aug 17, 2009
What does the employee handbook say? Most places allow a certain number of days as PTO then it starts coming from vacation then not paid.

I do not recall ever taking sick time off for myself (I'm seldom sick) but did have to take a few days with each kid's primary grade illnesses in. DH and i took turns and once hired a private duty nurse because DD was no longer really sick but couldn't go back for 5 days (chicken pox).

Vacation time and sick time is separate.
They are not out of sick time.
 

Nennie

Insert funny comment here!
Joined
Oct 11, 2005
I get 13 sick days per year, and we can roll them over from year to year. I've never used a sick day, and unless something horrible happens, I'll have over a years worth of sick time saved up when I retire, that can be added to my pension. If I need to take time off for doctors appointments, sick kids, etc, I use my annual leave.
 

wenrob

DIS Veteran
Joined
Apr 14, 2008
There is no separation between sick days, vacation and PTO for my DH, it’s all PTO. It accumulates over the year and does not roll over. To be honest I’m not exactly sure how many days it is, just that about this time of year he makes me crazy because he’s always underneath my feet. It’s use it or lose it so he uses it. All of them do. They coordinate with each other so everything is covered and unless they’re actually sick or on vacation are willing to go in if needed.
 

tvguy

Question anything the facts don't support.
Joined
Dec 15, 2003
Depends. Even though I work from home now, there are some things where one just can't concentrate and needs rest to recover. Maybe just keep up, attend group meetings, but otherwise try to stay out of the way until better.

I think California requires 5 days per calendar year.
3 days is what California requires.
 

tvguy

Question anything the facts don't support.
Joined
Dec 15, 2003
There is no separation between sick days, vacation and PTO for my DH, it’s all PTO. It accumulates over the year and does not roll over. To be honest I’m not exactly sure how many days it is, just that about this time of year he makes me crazy because he’s always underneath my feet. It’s use it or lose it so he uses it. All of them do. They coordinate with each other so everything is covered and unless they’re actually sick or on vacation are willing to go in if needed.
My former employer did away with sick time and went with PTO. In California employers must allow all vacation and PTO time to either be carried over or paid out. The only time you can't carry over is for holidays worked. Holidays in my industry are norm work days. Those have to be used in the year they were worked.
We had 64 locations, but only two were in California. It took corporate over two years to get the PTO rules worked out for use in California. They hired numerous labor attorneys to try and get out of having to allow the carry over of vacation or PTO and all told them it's the law, you can't get ouf it. The handbook has 12 additional pages just explaining PTO rules for the two California locations.
 

wenrob

DIS Veteran
Joined
Apr 14, 2008
My former employer did away with sick time and went with PTO. In California employers must allow all vacation and PTO time to either be carried over or paid out. The only time you can't carry over is for holidays worked. Holidays in my industry are norm work days. Those have to be used in the year they were worked.
We had 64 locations, but only two were in California. It took corporate over two years to get the PTO rules worked out for use in California. They hired numerous labor attorneys to try and get out of having to allow the carry over of vacation or PTO and all told them it's the law, you can't get ouf it. The handbook has 12 additional pages just explaining PTO rules for the two California locations.
Not the case here. When I worked for a casino vacation was use it or lose it and sick days? Ha!
 









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