Resort towns filling up during Coronavirus with Second HomeOwners?

aristocatz

DIS Veteran
Joined
Feb 22, 2009
I guess I feel that people have a right to go to their second homes. However, if you are coming from one area to a "new area", I feel you absolutely need to self quarantine for 14 days to be safe.
I 100% agree with you. I just think people should be banned from traveling more than locally for the next month or so.
 

wvjules

DIS Veteran
Joined
Mar 7, 2001
We have a house at a lake in western MD. We live near DC. We will be going to the lake house to work occasionally. We will still be sheltering in place but it will be someplace different. DBF and I are both working from home and my daughter and grandson just moved in. We NEED to go away to work once in a while or we will all go mad.
 

Southernmiss

I am hazed everyday
Joined
Aug 27, 2011
Our local newspaper did an article on this this evening.

We're an hour from New Orleans. The number of Louisiana license tags around town is noticeably more this week as their corona cases have exploded.

There are historical articles of the same thing happening in the 1800s with yellow fever. Our sleepy villages did not have yellow fever until those from the City came over to our beaches to escape.

Our local hospital has put a public plea out for PPE devices. They are running out of everything even with our own patients.

It's a dilemma.
 
  • Kellydelly

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Aug 25, 2004
    I am actually sitting at my second home right now. It is in an area of MI where many of the homes in this town are second homes. I never thought twice about "not belonging here" during this pandemic. There does not seem to be a whole bunch of people with the same idea, most of the homes on my street are still empty because of it being off season. I don't feel that I am using up anyone else's resources that live here full time. The grocery store still has food on the shelves and the gas station still has gas. And so far this place is not on the county map of having the virus. I plan to go back down state to work when I have to, and stay up here when I am free to do so.
     

    mnrose

    Queen of all she surveys
    Joined
    Jun 18, 2009
    I tend to think it's wrong to go from a "hot spot" to a "vacation" zone where the medical facilities are not designed to handle these sorts of cases. I get WHY people want to do it, but I'd be frankly more worried about the local small town hospital being able to treat me adequately than I would about "sheltering in place" in a hot zone. The truth is that eventually, this is going to be EVERYWHERE in every small town and area of the US. There's no "safe" place.
     

    NotUrsula

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Apr 19, 2002
    Our local newspaper did an article on this this evening.

    We're an hour from New Orleans. The number of Louisiana license tags around town is noticeably more this week as their corona cases have exploded.

    There are historical articles of the same thing happening in the 1800s with yellow fever. Our sleepy villages did not have yellow fever until those from the City came over to our beaches to escape.

    Our local hospital has put a public plea out for PPE devices. They are running out of everything even with our own patients.

    It's a dilemma.
    Unless those affluent visitors were packing mosquito larvae or your town already had a severe mosquito problem, their movement would not have brought Yellow Fever, because it doesn't pass from person to person. Yellow Fever gets passed from bug to person and then from person to bug, and so on down the line. This is why protective clothing and mosquito eradication works to stop it. Mosquitoes can move on their own for as far as about 3 miles, so Yellow Fever also travels with them, just a bit more slowly than with people. What REALLY spreads Yellow Fever is un-drained standing water that serves as mosquito hatcheries, which is why NOLA conquered it by building a robust pumping system. (However, at the time, people THOUGHT it passed from person to person, so it was easy to blame the city folk when they showed up right about at the same time of year that the mosquitoes did. That particular belief persists in many parts of the coastal south, even though the mosquito trucks have also become a part of local legend in their time.)

    Covid-19 is much different, because it is contagious between people and the virus is shed for a long period when asymptomatic. Limiting travel for this is much more effective.

    I think probably the single biggest factor in how much the practice spreads the coronavirus is what kind of transportation the migrants use, secondary to whether or not they self-quarantine as directed. If they come by private automobile it shouldn't be nearly as dangerous to others as arriving by air or train, all other behaviors being equal. It also follows that the shorter the distance from home the less opportunity they have to infect others, because they will stop and get out of the car fewer times while en route.
     
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    Julie's Haircut

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Oct 2, 2015
    I own a second home in Ocean City, NJ that I rent out from June thru September, The rest of the year DW and I visit every second or third weekend. We were planning to spend last weekend there until the mayor requested people like us NOT to do so.

    We do have to visit this weekend for an hour or two to clean the refrigerator and take care of a few other tasks. But we wont be staying.
     
  • Southernmiss

    I am hazed everyday
    Joined
    Aug 27, 2011
    From the CDC.

    Yellow fever virus is an RNA virus that belongs to the genus Flavivirus. It is related to West Nile, St. Louis encephalitis, and Japanese encephalitis viruses. Yellow fever virus is transmitted to people primarily through the bite of infected Aedes or Haemagogus species mosquitoes. Mosquitoes acquire the virus by feeding on infected primates (human or non-human) and then can transmit the virus to other primates (human or non-human). People infected with yellow fever virus are infectious to mosquitoes (referred to as being “viremic”) shortly before the onset of fever and up to 5 days after onset.

    Yes, different means of transmission. But still transferred because of humans.
     

    skyblue17

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Nov 4, 2017
    Does it really though? Most of the places people are coming to our area from have a higher ICU bed rate. The sense Ive gotten from most is that they like the idea of here because we have fewer restrictions. For instance, not all of our beaches are closed yet. No shelter in place order yet, etc. They are leaving places with several hundreds to thousands of ICU beds to go somewhere with 19 ICU beds.

    And, frankly, the NE (where most of our part time residents are from) is likely to get much more supplemental help that we are in Nowheresville, NC. Odds are their bed count will increase and ours will stay at 19. There are homes that still have tarps of their roof from Hurricane Frances in September of 2018 if that gives a hint as to what our infrastructure can handle.
    As a city dweller, yes. Granted, if one can afford a second home, they likely have more space than some do in a city apartment but there's little to no outdoor space, there are more people to navigate if going to get essentials yourself since most people travel on foot, etc. From a comfort in your own home level, going to a larger space with less people around is understandably appealing. But you are right that going from a place with a lot of hospitals close by to one with limited resources is risky.
     
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    pryncess527

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    May 26, 2013
    I’m sure most of these people make the decision without considering hospitals. Their goal is to avoid that by going to a lower density area where their isolation would likely be more comfortable. It may not be wise, but I doubt hospital capacity is a factor for most of these people.
     

    Hikergirl

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Feb 28, 2016
    I’m sure most of these people make the decision without considering hospitals. Their goal is to avoid that by going to a lower density area where their isolation would likely be more comfortable. It may not be wise, but I doubt hospital capacity is a factor for most of these people.
    Also if their home area is a hot spot they may feel at less risk going to a place that isn't.
     
  • QueenIsabella

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jan 17, 2016
    I'm torn on this. I can see wanting to get away where there's more space and fewer people, and I understand that, if you own that house, you should be able to stay there whenever you please. OTOH, though, the grocery stores and all aren't equipped to support extra people, and more importantly, the hospitals tend to be small. If you become seriously ill, they might not be able to provide the care you need (ICU beds, ventilators, etc.) And they might not be able to transfer you to a better-equipped facility, because those are overloaded with patients from their own region. So, you're betting that you won't need the medical facilities. If you're young and healthy, that might seem like a better bet--not so much if you're elderly or have a crappy immune system.
     

    aprilchem

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jan 9, 2013
    We have a second home at a ski resort about 2 hours from our house. We've been staying at our regular house during the week and at our vacation home on the weekend, for a change of pace and scenery for both us and the kids. We are "sheltered in place" at both locations and don't see anyone outside of our immediate family - we bring all of our own food and don't visit stores or any public places while we're there. I don't see any issue with this.
     

    Hikergirl

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Feb 28, 2016
    I'm sure that's what they're thinking. But they could also be spreading the virus to the new location.
    True, or they could have been following all the guidelines and mandates in their area while others aren't and decided it was better to get away from those people for their own health.
    I don't see any issue with responsible people traveling to their second property. If they have been doing all that they are supposed to be doing it is no different than them doing it at home.
    It's those who are willy nilly about all this and not following the rules, and I'd have an issue with them spreading it in their hometown or their vacation town.
     

    Searc

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Aug 12, 2018
    I’m sure most of these people make the decision without considering hospitals. Their goal is to avoid that by going to a lower density area where their isolation would likely be more comfortable. It may not be wise, but I doubt hospital capacity is a factor for most of these people.
    That is why our county's mandate telling people to stay away explicitly spells out the danger of their local health system being overwhelmed because of their selfish action.
     

    Hikergirl

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Feb 28, 2016
    We are traveling up to our camp today. Going to enjoy the beautiful day up there. May even spend the night, it's going to be a beautiful day there tomorrow.
    This is nothing we wouldn't be doing during a normal Spring. Tell me I'm not welcome to go and I'll tell you what you can do to yourself :thumbsup2
     

    mom2rtk

    Invented the term "Characterpalooza"
    Joined
    Aug 23, 2008
    True, or they could have been following all the guidelines and mandates in their area while others aren't and decided it was better to get away from those people for their own health.
    I don't see any issue with responsible people traveling to their second property. If they have been doing all that they are supposed to be doing it is no different than them doing it at home.
    It's those who are willy nilly about all this and not following the rules, and I'd have an issue with them spreading it in their hometown or their vacation town.
    I don't have an issue with responsible people doing it either.

    Now how do you get the irresponsible ones not to do it?
     

    pryncess527

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    May 26, 2013
    I don't have an issue with responsible people doing it either.

    Now how do you get the irresponsible ones not to do it?
    I don’t know, but that doesn’t seem like a problem unique to second homeowners & resort towns. How do I get people in my neighborhood who live here year round to be responsible?
     

    mom2rtk

    Invented the term "Characterpalooza"
    Joined
    Aug 23, 2008
    I don’t know, but that doesn’t seem like a problem unique to second homeowners & resort towns. How do I get people in my neighborhood who live here year round to be responsible?
    Are they traveling to other areas? I'm just saying that moving back and forth increases the odds someone could spread it in 2 locations instead of one.
     



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