How did you convince someone to visit WDW with you?

cjlong88

DIS Veteran
Joined
Aug 1, 2019
Growing up, I never visited WDW. It wasn't until I was 30 years old that my partner talked me into a trip. It took some convincing. Long story short, I'm hooked now. My partner and I do several, short weekend trips, but every 3 years or so we like to do a longer vacation where we stay 7-9 days.

My next longer vacation is August 2021 (8 days at Poly) with just my partner and the one after that will most likely be sometime in 2024. I would love to take my Dad, my brother and his partner, and my sister and her two daughters on our 2024 trip. They seem reluctant about WDW, but I think they will eventually say yes just because they know how much I love it and would come with me because I'm family. I'm trying to find the right way to spin the trip so they see this an awesome experience where everyone can something they really enjoy rather than the typical "it's just an overpriced theme park for little kids" perspective many people have.

How do you convince people someone to visit WDW with you?
 

Micca

SAHG: Stay At Home Grandfather
Joined
Dec 5, 2000
I'm trying to find the right way to spin the trip so they see this an awesome experience where everyone can something they really enjoy rather than the typical "it's just an overpriced theme park for little kids" perspective many people have.

How do you convince people someone to visit WDW with you?
Well obviously you're a convert and are well aware that it's not just an overpriced theme park. I think you talk to them about WDW attractions and experiences that aren't just standing in line for rides. You may not convince them but you can try to show them the variety offered at the parks.:earsboy::
 
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nursejackie

DIS Veteran
Joined
Oct 11, 2014
My best friend has been twice before (but never together) so when I signed up for a Run Disney event, she excitedly asked 'can I come too?' and I said yes of course, then her next words were 'can we go somewhere else afterwards?' and I thought to myself we don't want the same out of this trip. It's all about the parks for me - morning, noon and night. I wasn't sure I could convert her to that much Disney , but sadly coronavirus put an end to the trip, so I didn't have to try.
 

RUDisney

Mom to Ivan & Kristina
Joined
Apr 8, 2002
My DH didn't want to go to WDW with me. He thought it was an amusement park and told me we could go to Hershey or Dorney Park if I wanted to do that. I convinced him that it wasn't an amusement park and he begrudgingly went with me. I told him by the end of the trip, he'd be singing along with the piped in music, too.

On our last day, we were holding hands, walking into Epcot as he was singing Christmas Carols with me. It was the first week of December 1997. That's the trip that he decided 7 days was not long enough and every trip since then has been 10 days. His favorite part of a Disney vacation is the food. When I thought we'd switch it up and go to UO, he was worried that he wouldn't like the food as much as WDW... that was until he found out that Emeril had several restaurants, plus a Palm Restaurant, etc.
 

cjlong88

DIS Veteran
Joined
Aug 1, 2019
My DH didn't want to go to WDW with me. He thought it was an amusement park and told me we could go to Hershey or Dorney Park if I wanted to do that. I convinced him that it wasn't an amusement park and he begrudgingly went with me. I told him by the end of the trip, he'd be singing along with the piped in music, too.

On our last day, we were holding hands, walking into Epcot as he was singing Christmas Carols with me. It was the first week of December 1997. That's the trip that he decided 7 days was not long enough and every trip since then has been 10 days. His favorite part of a Disney vacation is the food. When I thought we'd switch it up and go to UO, he was worried that he wouldn't like the food as much as WDW... that was until he found out that Emeril had several restaurants, plus a Palm Restaurant, etc.

This warmed my heart!
 

Mitchellfamily7814

Earning My Ears
Joined
Oct 30, 2019
I think from my experience, describing attractions, food, an Epcot festival, or immersive theming of the parks or lands is great, and more importantly describing special moments you had or experienced in the parks can help them understand how magical of a place it really is. I’ve hyped family and friends with my own photos, YouTube videos from vloggers, food and wine festival menus, you name it...and I think when they feel and see your excitement, (as long as they have at least a little love for Disney) they will jump on it. Good luck and hope you have a wonderful trip :)
 

Wendysofftoneverland

DIS Veteran
Joined
Sep 18, 2017
My first trip to Disney with my husband was because I was doing a runDisney marathon. I go there a lot as an adult, but only went to Disney once as a kid, and he only went there once as a teen. My parents recently accompanied us on a trip to help out with my kid, and they just stayed at the resort instead of going to the parks. They love going to Fort Wilderness. So for them, it was showing them all the Disney Springs dining and resort things to do. One time we got a suite and 3 different couples in my family would go in different directions during the day, but we would all start the day with breakfast together. For my husband, it was showing him how Disney transports you to what feels like different places through their theming and always finding something new to do each trip. Or like someone else said, reading the list of performers at a festival (in preCovid times) or menu items. Also, showing discounts and deals helps get my family on board, because many of them do think it is overpriced, especially considering we have a local theme park.
 

michelleiada

DIS Veteran
Joined
May 12, 2006
Ive had to convince people to come with us in the past. I don’t think people realize just how big it is and how much that Disney has to offer. It truly offers something for everyone. Where can you go and get beautifully landscaped, meticulously updated and clean theme parks with high tech rides, mini broadway like shows, top notch entertainment, night time spectaculars, and a huge variety of dining from fine dining to burgers, fries, pizza, etc? Also two amazingly fun water parks. You can participate in so many recreational activities like shopping, golfing, horseback riding, fishing, boating, parasailing. The WDW resorts are awesome with beautiful pools. And then...there is the MAGIC, and that is something I have a difficult time explaining. You just have to be there to feel it (and not everyone does). There is something so magical about being there for me. Maybe you can try some YouTube videos. There are some great vloggers out there that do a great job capturing how magical it is. If you have never been to Disney, its hard to understand how amazing and magical it is.
 

Disney loving Iowan

DIS Veteran
Joined
Oct 10, 2007
My DH didn't want to go to WDW with me. He thought it was an amusement park and told me we could go to Hershey or Dorney Park if I wanted to do that. I convinced him that it wasn't an amusement park and he begrudgingly went with me. I told him by the end of the trip, he'd be singing along with the piped in music, too.

On our last day, we were holding hands, walking into Epcot as he was singing Christmas Carols with me. It was the first week of December 1997. That's the trip that he decided 7 days was not long enough and every trip since then has been 10 days. His favorite part of a Disney vacation is the food. When I thought we'd switch it up and go to UO, he was worried that he wouldn't like the food as much as WDW... that was until he found out that Emeril had several restaurants, plus a Palm Restaurant, etc.
I almost did a spit take when you said he compared what I used to call Dorkey Park with Disney. LOL As much as I love Hershey that doesn't come close either. Glad your DH ended up loving Disney.
 

happymommy

DIS Veteran
Joined
Jan 8, 2006
Honestly, I’d say if they aren’t into it, I wouldn’t push it. I’ve been twice where my folks kind of invited themselves along (once off site; they just joined us for a couple days including just one park day. Other time, DSis and her family came too, and we all stayed at AKL). My folks don’t like Disney much, or theme parks at all really. They wanted to spend time with us, so thought it would be fun. Wrong. I tried my best to get them to a show that would be fun, made dining reservations, but they really didn’t get it or like it, complained quite a bit, thought everything cost too much (even though we paid for all our own things like room, meals, tickets, etc).

Also, the trip with my Sis’s family, there were 12 of us total. We met up for a few meals, came and went together and apart, but my DH felt like he needed to “babysit” my dad a lot (took him back to the resort so they could have a few beers by the pool), and it was just a lot to coordinate. It really wasn’t much of a vacation honestly. Just trying to please too many people was too much, so I swore never again.

If they aren’t interested, I’d say drop it and enjoy yourself!
 

cjlong88

DIS Veteran
Joined
Aug 1, 2019
Anyone who I have to convince can stay home. You are either a Disney person or you are not.

But that was me. My partner had to convince me to go. I love Disney AND theme parks. But I just didn't realize adults could go and have an amazing time as well. WDW is really for everyone, not just kids. And I didn't realize that until I went. Now look at me, perfectly obsessed and visiting twice a year.

My folks don’t like Disney much, or theme parks at all really. They wanted to spend time with us, so thought it would be fun. Wrong. I tried my best to get them to a show that would be fun, made dining reservations, but they really didn’t get it or like it, complained quite a bit, thought everything cost too much (even though we paid for all our own things like room, meals, tickets, etc).

My dad and sister love both Disney and theme parks in general. It's just they've never had to chance to go, and I think they see it as a lost opportunity because they are "too old" for something like WDW.

I started talking to my dad and sister about the amenities on property and that seemed to interest them more. I never try to convince someone to do something unless I truly believe they will absolutely love it. Happens all the time with my partner and TV shows. I'll beg him to watch something because I just know he will love it. He finally caves. We start watching and by the end all talks about is how amazing the show is. This has happened with my dad and sister, too. I convinced my dad to visit Atlanta and he just wasn't excited about it. But I KNEW he would love it because I know what makes him enjoy a vacation. Now all he talks about is how great that trip was and we should do it again.

So I bring up Disney, and I see the same look he gave me before I took him to ATL. And I'm like, "Dad...we've been here before. I know what you like. TRUST ME." He's so hesitant. And it drives me bonkers because I know at the very bottom of my heart that he would absolutely adore this place if I could just show him all of the things that makes a WDW vacation special.

I don't plan on touring the parks or the resorts the way I would for myself or my partner. This trip is about THEM. Making the most out of their experience. Spa days. Golfing. Dining and enjoying night life. A few thrill rides here or there. Shows and fireworks. I so badly want to give them a trip I know they would absolutely love. They just need to pull the freaking trigger and say YES!!!
 

happymommy

DIS Veteran
Joined
Jan 8, 2006
Okay, I totally hear you, and think YES! They likely will love every minute! I’m older (well, early 50’s) so thrill rides are few and far between for me now, but once the shows can come back, I love them! And I find there is some really good dining to be had there too!

Good luck in your planning. I often find the planning just so much fun, as it gives me something to look forward to. I hope to go, maybe solo again or with my youngest, in 2022.
 

RUDisney

Mom to Ivan & Kristina
Joined
Apr 8, 2002
@cjlong88, a little more than 30 years ago, we wanted to take my grandmother to WDW. She knew that she loved it and we were ready to book the trip. That's when she told us that she would have a heart attack and die if we made her go on a plane, so we took 2 cars from PA to FL. The first day in the park, she lasted until around 3. She wanted to sit and people watch. My parents wanted to get her a wheelchair to keep moving, but with her in comfort. We were offsite, about a 20 minute drive from the parks, so it wasn't an easy option to take her back to the house to rest.

When she found out that (at that time) wheelchairs moved to the front of the line, she agreed to use one and she had a great time because her ankles weren't swelling and uncomfortable like on the first day. My DGM was truly a little old lady and she had a blast with us.

Her other dream was to go to HI. However, the whole, "I won't go one a plane" thing prevented her from going there. I'm glad that I got to experience WDW with her even though she truly made the first day stressful and unfun by the end of the day.
 

Pinkshoos

Mouseketeer
Joined
Jul 4, 2018
Growing up, I never visited WDW. It wasn't until I was 30 years old that my partner talked me into a trip. It took some convincing. Long story short, I'm hooked now. My partner and I do several, short weekend trips, but every 3 years or so we like to do a longer vacation where we stay 7-9 days.

My next longer vacation is August 2021 (8 days at Poly) with just my partner and the one after that will most likely be sometime in 2024. I would love to take my Dad, my brother and his partner, and my sister and her two daughters on our 2024 trip. They seem reluctant about WDW, but I think they will eventually say yes just because they know how much I love it and would come with me because I'm family. I'm trying to find the right way to spin the trip so they see this an awesome experience where everyone can something they really enjoy rather than the typical "it's just an overpriced theme park for little kids" perspective many people have.

How do you convince people someone to visit WDW with you?

I’d probably pick out something they love in their normal lives, and match it to something at Disney. There’s something for everyone, really. And for the introverts in the group that need their alone time, remind them of all the quiet, relaxing places where they can split from the group and the crowds and have some time for themselves.
 

Ohiostatefan606

Mouseketeer
Joined
Aug 16, 2019
Our first trip was 6 years, our son was 7. My husband went along with the whole thing to "humor me". I wanted our son to go to Disney when he would remember it, but still be young enough to just be in awe. I think my husband was really on the one and done train. Well, here we are 6 years later. We have gone every year since! Just once a year over an extended weekend either MLK or President's Day. My husband has admitted, he enjoys it way more than he ever thought he would. He said even though there are so many people, it really is an adventure for just our family.
 

Kitty & Covs Covs

Mouseketeer
Joined
Mar 20, 2019
I think it’s equally important that once you convince them you are really attentive to what they want out of the trip—or they’ll never believe you or go with you again. My husband hates lines and hates the high prices for everything, so we have to take a very relaxed approach and bring snacks for my daughter and our own water bottles and keep meal costs down. I also try to keep him away from any receipts!

Make sure to show them the other stuff that is offered they might like, so you aren’t pulling a bait and switch. So, I think it’s also good to consider once you’ve convinced them do you actually WANT them the come, ha!
 

VandVsmama

DIS Veteran
Joined
Mar 28, 2011
Growing up, I never visited WDW. It wasn't until I was 30 years old that my partner talked me into a trip. It took some convincing. Long story short, I'm hooked now. My partner and I do several, short weekend trips, but every 3 years or so we like to do a longer vacation where we stay 7-9 days.

My next longer vacation is August 2021 (8 days at Poly) with just my partner and the one after that will most likely be sometime in 2024. I would love to take my Dad, my brother and his partner, and my sister and her two daughters on our 2024 trip. They seem reluctant about WDW, but I think they will eventually say yes just because they know how much I love it and would come with me because I'm family. I'm trying to find the right way to spin the trip so they see this an awesome experience where everyone can something they really enjoy rather than the typical "it's just an overpriced theme park for little kids" perspective many people have.

How do you convince people someone to visit WDW with you?

Some thoughts to consider when including people in a Disney trip when they aren't "Disney people:"
  1. Set some ground rules for your large group. Ground rule #1 should be that you all don't have to spend every waking moment with each other. Rule #2 should be that if you've agreed to meet at a certain place and a certain time, that you'll wait X minutes for late comers but after that, you're moving on and the late comers can catch up.
  2. Every portion of the group should ideally have their own bed/room with a door they can shut, so they can have down time and peace and quiet from the rest of the group. You'll all have a better time together that way.
  3. Consider where they normally like to vacation. Find out what their ideal/favorite vacation is and why they like it so much. Then find something comparable to that at WDW so they get a taste of it. For example, group #1 are outdoorsy hikers/get out into nature people who love national parks and stuff like that. Get them over to Fort Wilderness to rent a canoe or a kayak. Get them to go horseback riding. Group #2 love to take their boat out on holiday weekends? Have everybody rent one of those boats from Contemporary Resort or Fort Wilderness (?) or maybe it's Wilderness Lodge as well.
  4. Consider the sleep & routine needs of the various people in the group. Some people might be rope droppers while others might want to sleep in all morning and not get to the parks until 2 pm. Set a ground rule that this is ok to do, but the rope droppers aren't going to wait around all day at the resort for the sleeping-in-people to get around to going to MK.
  5. Consider that some people are night owls while others want to go to bed early. This is why everybody needs their own bedroom with a door that closes (i.e., no sleeping in common spaces).
  6. Do ONE sit down meal together each day. Lunch or dinner.
  7. Ideally, make everybody get PH tickets. So you can go on 1 or 2 rides together at park #1 and then if some of the group wants to head to, let's say, Epcot for the evening or HS while others want to go to MK or back to the room, you have options to have everybody do their own thing with no hard feelings or frustrations.
  8. Have each person in the group decide what is THE #1 "thing" they want to do on the trip. Once they get to do their "#1 thing," the attitude should be "everything else is icing on the cake."
  9. Set another ground rule that you all need to communicate with each other. Nobody can read anybody else's minds and everybody has totally different vacation styles. Once somebody goes in with 1 set of expectations but doesn't communicate it, and then gets mad at everybody else for not meeting those expectations, your grand plans of a big happy extended family trip go down the drain and everybody ends up miserable.
 










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