Can you "drive stick"?

mamamelody2

DIS Veteran
Joined
Apr 29, 2016
Well, my high school car was a stick. I didn't love it, but I got pretty good at it. However, that was 30 years ago and I haven't driven stick since. MAYBE I could do it. It would definitely take some time to get used to it again.
 

NotUrsula

DIS Veteran
Joined
Apr 19, 2002
Yep. Learned to drive on a '66 Plymouth Fury wagon, three on the tree. Got a '74 Corolla in 1987 with 4 on the floor -- thought that was a cool upgrade, LOL. My last manual was a '96 Altima 5-speed. I really miss driving a stick; I really like the connection to the road that you get with them. (BTW, DH cannot drive a manual. I tried to teach him, but it was hopeless.)
My current Outback has paddle shifters, and I do use them, particularly on steep inclines &/or in wet weather.

Now here's the corollary followup: can you drive a right-hand-drive stick? I can, but it was a wee bit hairy the first time I tried it (in Ireland.) I kept whacking my right hand against the car door, LOL. Interestingly, though the stick is on the opposite side, the gears themselves are usually still in the same order, so it isn't a mirror-image motion with your left hand.
 

GoingSince1990

DIS Veteran
Joined
Oct 31, 2018
Yes. Grew up and learned to drive in the UK where everyone learns and takes their test on a manual car, because if you take your test with an automatic your license is restricted so that you are only ever allowed to drive an automatic. Which is why the majority of UK residents drive a manual car, because they tend to stick (no pun intended) with the type of car they learned on.
 

_19disnA

DIS Veteran
Joined
Aug 8, 2018
No. Never saw a need to learn and even some of the modern sports cars now have 'dual clutches' which doesn't require you to manually shift gears or have a 3rd pedal. Rode with some people in the past who weren't very good at shifting their manual transmission and always found the ride very jerky. Improvements in automatic transmissions over the years probably means you get about the same fuel economy with either.
 

Stratman50th

Loving all things Fort Wilderness!
Joined
Nov 17, 2019
Yes, learned on a manual. Taught my wife how to drive a manual. Last one we had was in 1993. Tore up both knees and had to switch to automatics. My daughter was born in 94 and I regret not having one available to teach her. Oh well, besides sports cars there aren't many left. (New ones anyway).
 

georgina

DIS Veteran
Joined
Apr 21, 2003
Yes. I learned from my HS boyfriend, first car out of college in 1985 was manual (Honda), have been driving manual transmission Subarus since 1990 (have to order them, not on the lot). Next car will probably be electric and will miss it.

I did pay extra to reserve an automatic when we are in England in July. Getting used to opposite everything it seemed like a good idea.
 

LoveSpringsteen

DIS Veteran
Joined
Mar 5, 2010
I’ve been driving for almost 40 years and I have no idea how to drive a stick shift. I agree with @SM1992, if I was called on for that certain around the world race, I would learn how to drive a stick! 😁.
 

JaxDad

DIS Veteran
Joined
Sep 23, 2014
Now here's the corollary followup: can you drive a right-hand-drive stick? I can, but it was a wee bit hairy the first time I tried it (in Ireland.) I kept whacking my right hand against the car door, LOL. Interestingly, though the stick is on the opposite side, the gears themselves are usually still in the same order, so it isn't a mirror-image motion with your left hand.
Yes. I’ve driven right-hand-drive stick in Great Britain several times. I’ve also driven left-hand-drive stick in the left lane several times in Trinidad. That was interesting too!
 

JAMIESMITH

DIS Veteran
Joined
Jan 26, 2011
I drive one every day. My Honda Accord has a five speed manual transmission and so does my husband's Toyota Tacoma. Our older daughter has absolutely no interest in learning to drive a stick so that kills my plan of handing my car down to her.
 

fla4fun

DIS Veteran
Joined
Nov 12, 2006
No. They didn’t have any available during driver’s ed class, and I don’t recall my dad buying any manual transmissions after I was maybe eight years old, so I didn’t have access to learn at home either. In all the years I have been driving, I have only known two people who drove manual cars, and I didn’t know them well enough to ask for driving lessons.
 

mumto3girls

DIS Veteran
Joined
Jul 22, 2008
Well, my high school car was a stick. I didn't love it, but I got pretty good at it. However, that was 30 years ago and I haven't driven stick since. MAYBE I could do it. It would definitely take some time to get used to it again.
I was about to say yes—I learned on one and drove one for years, but it’s been a long long time. I suspect it’s like riding a bike and you don’t forget, but I bet I haven’t even tried in 25 years.
 

NotUrsula

DIS Veteran
Joined
Apr 19, 2002
Wow, even in 1966 a Plymouth Fury Wagon with a manual transmission would have been very rare.
Not when you're as frugal as my BIL, LOL. He special-ordered the most stripped-down Fury I model possible: manual 3, no power steering, no power brakes, no right-side rearview mirror, no retractors on the lap-only seatbelts, and no A/C (in coastal Louisiana! And it was black.) He bought it under protest, after having kids (and the Nader report!) forced him to give up his beloved '60 Corvair. By the time I got my time in it, it was 12 years old, and showing every minute of it.

It was a beast to drive. Power steering/brakes were an absolute game-changer after that.
 

kanerf

DIS Veteran
Joined
Oct 16, 2009
Yes, usually only get the opportunity when I rent a car overseas. Have not seen a manual in the US in years.
 

DisneyHardin

DIS Veteran
Joined
Jan 20, 2010
It's been about 15 years since I have, but it's pretty much like riding a bike, so I might kill the engine a couple times at first, but it would come back to me.
 








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