Have you gotten a COVID vaccine?

PollyannaMom

I was a click-clack champ!!
Joined
May 16, 2006
So, how long after the vax did your DS experience the vomiting/chills? Asking bc my young adult DD and DS just got their 2nd Pfizer this afternoon and I know younger persons sometimes react differently than older ones.
DH and I got our 2nd Friday. He was fine. I had chills, fever, body aches for a few hours during the night but that was all.
About 2 1/2 days. He got the vaccine late in the afternoon on a Wednesday, and the chills and vomiting weren't until early Saturday morning. He felt OK Saturday afternoon and Sunday morning, but was extra tired Sunday night. He was back to normal on Monday (5 days post-vax).
 

crazymomof4

DIS Veteran
Joined
Jan 12, 2003
About 2 1/2 days. He got the vaccine late in the afternoon on a Wednesday, and the chills and vomiting weren't until early Saturday morning. He felt OK Saturday afternoon and Sunday morning, but was extra tired Sunday night. He was back to normal on Monday (5 days post-vax).
OK Wow! thanks. I won't tell my kids this but I'm glad I have this heads-up so if it happens, I know it's not outside of the realm of possibilities.
 

Becky Mouse

Mouseketeer
Joined
Apr 22, 2016
I'm actually surprised that you used to pbs story to make this point. It basically discredits the title very quickly. It starts by saying that only 1 in 8 were newly diagnosed with for the first time. Then, later in the article it states that for the newly diagnosed patients, other stressors may be at play if the patient knows they have covid. Then, it says for the other 7 in 8 people that have been previously diagnosed with a neuropsychiatric condition, they can't say if these people would have another diagnosis regardless of covid status. And, it says that patients with covid might be more likely to have a neurological and psychiatric disorder diagnosed simply because they were receiving more medical attention compared to patients with the flu or other respiratory problems. Also, in the article, an assistant professor in the division of neuro-infectious diseases at Mount Sinai sounded caution stating that strokes are fairly uncommon with covid and she doesn't want people thinking that it is even 1 in 10 people that it happens to.

I'm not saying there are not some neuropsychiatric effects in some people, but I don't think it's nearly 1 in 3. There are too many other factors at play to know. And, this article would do little to convince someone to get the vaccine if they are hesitant.
Let me create an analogy for you. Let's say, hypothetically, that they said, "1 in 3 people who have had COVID-19 will have a heart attack within 6 months, but 7/8 of those people have had issues with circulation already."

That's what's going on here, but with mental health. After surviving COVID-19, 1 in 3 people experience cognitive problems within 6 months. The PBS article describes it as "psychiatric or neurological illness." Yes, some of those people had a history of mental health issues. The point is, these problems are resurfacing in these people, some are developing new cognitive problems, and people without any history are also experiencing mental health and cognitive problems post-COVID.

Within 6 months after surviving COVID, 1 out of 3 people suffer from neurological problems. That's terrible. For 6 months after surviving COVID, people also have a 60% increased risk in cause of death.

The virus is causing long-term problems in many people that include cognitive issues, mental health issues, and problems with the heart, lungs, and kidneys.

My point remains the same. We KNOW that COVID-19 is very deadly and dangerous. Why would you choose that option over a vaccine?
Some people say they are worried the vaccine "might" have unknown long term effects, but we know the virus does. It doesn't make sense to choose the virus. Just get the shot.

COVID-19 survivors have increased risk of death six months after diagnosis, study finds
https://www.stltoday.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/coronavirus/covid-19-survivors-have-increased-risk-of-death-six-months-after-diagnosis-study-finds/article_afa7c9b6-76e8-5290-b850-ab9571b9d327.html
 

Christine

DIS Veteran
Joined
Aug 31, 1999
Let me create an analogy for you. Let's say, hypothetically, that they said, "1 in 3 people who have had COVID-19 will have a heart attack within 6 months, but 7/8 of those people have had issues with circulation already."

That's what's going on here, but with mental health. After surviving COVID-19, 1 in 3 people experience cognitive problems within 6 months. The PBS article describes it as "psychiatric or neurological illness." Yes, some of those people had a history of mental health issues. The point is, these problems are resurfacing in these people, some are developing new cognitive problems, and people without any history are also experiencing mental health and cognitive problems post-COVID.

Within 6 months after surviving COVID, 1 out of 3 people suffer from neurological problems. That's terrible. For 6 months after surviving COVID, people also have a 60% increased risk in cause of death.

The virus is causing long-term problems in many people that include cognitive issues, mental health issues, and problems with the heart, lungs, and kidneys.

My point remains the same. We KNOW that COVID-19 is very deadly and dangerous. Why would you choose that option over a vaccine?
Some people say they are worried the vaccine "might" have unknown long term effects, but we know the virus does. It doesn't make sense to choose the virus. Just get the shot.

COVID-19 survivors have increased risk of death six months after diagnosis, study finds
https://www.stltoday.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/coronavirus/covid-19-survivors-have-increased-risk-of-death-six-months-after-diagnosis-study-finds/article_afa7c9b6-76e8-5290-b850-ab9571b9d327.html
This does have me wondering. My coworker got COVID in November. In my opinion it was a mild case in that she didn't have to go the hospital and didn't have any severe symptoms. Just like having the flu and then a lot of fatigue. But, IMO, she's not right cognitively. I wouldn't say a word...but I've noticed things over the past couple of months. Her mental acuity, analytical thoughts are just lagging. She may notice herself but is just not saying anything.
 
  • leahgoogle

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    Feb 9, 2014
    Let me create an analogy for you. Let's say, hypothetically, that they said, "1 in 3 people who have had COVID-19 will have a heart attack within 6 months, but 7/8 of those people have had issues with circulation already."

    That's what's going on here, but with mental health. After surviving COVID-19, 1 in 3 people experience cognitive problems within 6 months. The PBS article describes it as "psychiatric or neurological illness." Yes, some of those people had a history of mental health issues. The point is, these problems are resurfacing in these people, some are developing new cognitive problems, and people without any history are also experiencing mental health and cognitive problems post-COVID.

    Within 6 months after surviving COVID, 1 out of 3 people suffer from neurological problems. That's terrible. For 6 months after surviving COVID, people also have a 60% increased risk in cause of death.

    The virus is causing long-term problems in many people that include cognitive issues, mental health issues, and problems with the heart, lungs, and kidneys.

    My point remains the same. We KNOW that COVID-19 is very deadly and dangerous. Why would you choose that option over a vaccine?
    Some people say they are worried the vaccine "might" have unknown long term effects, but we know the virus does. It doesn't make sense to choose the virus. Just get the shot.

    COVID-19 survivors have increased risk of death six months after diagnosis, study finds
    https://www.stltoday.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/coronavirus/covid-19-survivors-have-increased-risk-of-death-six-months-after-diagnosis-study-finds/article_afa7c9b6-76e8-5290-b850-ab9571b9d327.html
    1 in 3 people experience cognitive problems after covid, but it can't be definitively be linked to covid. The article says that. You are not going to convince me that the 1 in 3 stat is true without a better study. The 60% increased risk of death could be from other factors too. Just like some say that you can't definitively link side-effects (including death) to the vaccine, you can't always definitively link death months after covid to covid. While some experience long-term adverse effects from covid (which is horrible), an overwhelming amount don't. That is why you see vaccine hesitancy. Many people have had covid and it was mild. Why risk the unknown individual reaction of a vaccine when you already know what to expect? And, yes, if they get covid again it might be worse, but maybe it won't. That is the risk each individual has to decide for themselves. Let me tell you, the side effects from the vaccine some people are reporting blow the mild cases of covid out of the water. Not good for getting people to get the vaccine.
     

    caroline5177

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    Nov 3, 2019
    Second Moderna shot yesterday- extremely sore arm and have felt a tad achy and almost feverish today, but no fever.

    17yo son had his second Pfizer this past weekend and had sore arm, achiness and tired (also, he's a swimmer and swam for 2.5 hours the morning of his shot, so I'm sure that adds a bit).

    Interestingly (maybe not surprising though), both my parents and in-laws had minimal side effects with either vaccine.
     

    Becky Mouse

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    Apr 22, 2016
    1 in 3 people experience cognitive problems after covid, but it can't be definitively be linked to covid. The article says that. You are not going to convince me that the 1 in 3 stat is true without a better study. The 60% increased risk of death could be from other factors too. Just like some say that you can't definitively link side-effects (including death) to the vaccine, you can't always definitively link death months after covid to covid. While some experience long-term adverse effects from covid (which is horrible), an overwhelming amount don't. That is why you see vaccine hesitancy. Many people have had covid and it was mild. Why risk the unknown individual reaction of a vaccine when you already know what to expect? And, yes, if they get covid again it might be worse, but maybe it won't. That is the risk each individual has to decide for themselves. Let me tell you, the side effects from the vaccine some people are reporting blow the mild cases of covid out of the water. Not good for getting people to get the vaccine.
    I think you're in denial regarding how dangerous this virus is. It has caused hospitals and funeral parlors to be overwhelmed in countries around the world. In the United States, we have had nearly 600,000 Americans die from the virus. The odds are 1 in 56 that if you catch the virus, you will die from it. You might not "like" the studies, but many survivors are experiencing heart problems, kidney problems, lung problems, and cognitive problems. One of my coworker's husbands had a fairly mild case of COVID, but he developed pulmonary embolisms two months later. It's not uncommon. People who have had COVID, even with mild symptoms, frequently have lungs that look like the lungs of a lifetime smoker. This virus is nasty.

    I get people feel afraid of something new like the vaccine. It's new, and it scares you. But you have a choice between something that has been used billions of times safely, or a virus that kills.

    The best part about choosing the vaccine is that you don't just protect your life. You protect others around you, so then you can spend time with people in your life who are at risk again. Do you have a loved one with cancer, diabetes, or Downs Syndrome? You can get vaccinated so you can visit with them again without risking their life. The vaccine is AMAZING and life changing. I get that you're afraid of it, but maybe think about talking to your doctor so you can ask your questions, share your fears, and let your doctor talk to you about the virus and the vaccine.


    Post-COVID lungs worse than the worst smokers' lungs, surgeon says
    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/covid-lungs-scarring-smokers-lungs/
     
  • crazymomof4

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jan 12, 2003
    My sister had flu like side effects for five days after her shot. But I know she was run down from extra hours at work, which probably affected her response.
    I would tend to agree with that. I know someone who was "run down" (his words) from working long hours and he had a worse reaction than most
     

    JLTraveling

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Apr 3, 2005
    I think you're in denial regarding how dangerous this virus is. It has caused hospitals and funeral parlors to be overwhelmed in countries around the world. In the United States, we have had nearly 600,000 Americans die from the virus. The odds are 1 in 56 that if you catch the virus, you will die from it. You might not "like" the studies, but many survivors are experiencing heart problems, kidney problems, lung problems, and cognitive problems. One of my coworker's husbands had a fairly mild case of COVID, but he developed pulmonary embolisms two months later. It's not uncommon. People who have had COVID, even with mild symptoms, frequently have lungs that look like the lungs of a lifetime smoker. This virus is nasty.

    I get people feel afraid of something new like the vaccine. It's new, and it scares you. But you have a choice between something that has been used billions of times safely, or a virus that kills.

    The best part about choosing the vaccine is that you don't just protect your life. You protect others around you, so then you can spend time with people in your life who are at risk again. Do you have a loved one with cancer, diabetes, or Downs Syndrome? You can get vaccinated so you can visit with them again without risking their life. The vaccine is AMAZING and life changing. I get that you're afraid of it, but maybe think about talking to your doctor so you can ask your questions, share your fears, and let your doctor talk to you about the virus and the vaccine.


    Post-COVID lungs worse than the worst smokers' lungs, surgeon says
    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/covid-lungs-scarring-smokers-lungs/
    Very well said. I've already shared the story of my uncle's psychiatric problems after his second bout of Covid. Let me add another example. A married couple I know in their 30s: both extremely fit, avid bikers, walk everywhere, etc. They had pretty mild Covid in April 2020. Not hospitalized, miserable for a few days, no big deal. Fast forward to the end of last year, and the massive car accident they had when he blacked out at the wheel and the car ran into a swamp. They're okay, but it was only then that they found out he needed a pacemaker because of Covid damage to his heart. She's still having lung problems. They may never be the same again following their "mild" infection.

    Unfortunately, humans are horrible at calculating risk. A certain percentage of the population, especially those who are predisposed to be skeptical of science, genuinely believe that the risks of vaccination are higher than the risks of Covid (even the risks to their elderly or immunocompromised loved ones). It's based on literally nothing, but I have no idea how to dispel those tightly held beliefs.
     

    adkkev

    hiking fool
    Joined
    Jan 6, 2008
    1 in 3 people experience cognitive problems after covid, but it can't be definitively be linked to covid. The article says that. You are not going to convince me that the 1 in 3 stat is true without a better study. The 60% increased risk of death could be from other factors too. Just like some say that you can't definitively link side-effects (including death) to the vaccine, you can't always definitively link death months after covid to covid. While some experience long-term adverse effects from covid (which is horrible), an overwhelming amount don't. That is why you see vaccine hesitancy. Many people have had covid and it was mild. Why risk the unknown individual reaction of a vaccine when you already know what to expect? Let me tell you, the side effects from the vaccine some people are reporting blow the mild cases of covid out of the water. Not good for getting people to get the vaccine.
    149 million adults in the United States have received at least one vaccine shot. So, please enlighten us all, how many folks are having these horrible side effects? In the original trials of the vaccines, how many individuals had side effects that blew mild cases of COVID19 out of the water? Do you have sources? And please, no links to random YouTube videos or individuals appearing on the Tucker Carlson entertainment show. Thank you.
     

    leahgoogle

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    Feb 9, 2014
    Very well said. I've already shared the story of my uncle's psychiatric problems after his second bout of Covid. Let me add another example. A married couple I know in their 30s: both extremely fit, avid bikers, walk everywhere, etc. They had pretty mild Covid in April 2020. Not hospitalized, miserable for a few days, no big deal. Fast forward to the end of last year, and the massive car accident they had when he blacked out at the wheel and the car ran into a swamp. They're okay, but it was only then that they found out he needed a pacemaker because of Covid damage to his heart. She's still having lung problems. They may never be the same again following their "mild" infection.

    Unfortunately, humans are horrible at calculating risk. A certain percentage of the population, especially those who are predisposed to be skeptical of science, genuinely believe that the risks of vaccination are higher than the risks of Covid (even the risks to their elderly or immunocompromised loved ones). It's based on literally nothing, but I have no idea how to dispel those tightly held beliefs.
    There is science on both sides of the vaccine. I think the difference is that you have personally seen what post covid symptoms can be and I have personally seen what post vaccination symptoms can be. I'll wait until the science shows me that the vaccine is safe long-term. Not six months long-term. Years long-term.
     

    leahgoogle

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    Feb 9, 2014
    149 million adults in the United States have received at least one vaccine shot. So, please enlighten us all, how many folks are having these horrible side effects? In the original trials of the vaccines, how many individuals had side effects that blew mild cases of COVID19 out of the water? Do you have sources? And please, no links to random YouTube videos or individuals appearing on the Tucker Carlson entertainment show. Thank you.
    I actually was referring to this thread...lol. Many of the people on this thread have had side effects much worse than my symptoms or the symptoms of other people I know who have had covid already. The flu was much worse for me. H1N1 hospitalized my husband. Covid was a cold for him with very little lung involvement. My brother said rotovirus (which his kids were vaccinated for and still got...but, I digress) was much worse than covid. I agree. rotovirus was a bear. I don't deny that covid has been very serious for many people. It has also been mild for many people too.
     

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