TSA at Orlando airport and DS's autism

Discussion in 'disABILITIES!' started by connie254, Nov 27, 2017.

  1. connie254

    connie254 Disney fanatic

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    I'm taking the advice of contacting TSA beforehand. There are way too many people who are scared of dogs for them to make my son go through this. He has been patted down before and doesn't have a problem with that.
     
  2. Tinknalli

    Tinknalli DIS Veteran

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    They use the dogs at high traffic times to make the process quicker. When the dog is in use you do not have to remove shoes etc and the lines at scanners move more quickly. You can expect to see this often at MCO with their huge security waits. I would assume you can ask for alternate screening which will be more thorough. I would expect a longer wait for alternate screening.
     
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  4. connie254

    connie254 Disney fanatic

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    I contacted TSA about the issue. I gave them our upcoming flight information and was told to ask for the Passenger support specialist at the security checkpoint.
     
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  5. connie254

    connie254 Disney fanatic

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    It's not an issue anymore with my mother-she passed away 13 years ago. The vast majority of the time we visit my sister, we are outside anyway because of the kids playing. The dog is inside or on a leash outside and the person holding the leash has good control. The dog scares the younger cousins as well. I'm considering buying treats to give it to see if it will calm down around me and eventually my son.
     
  6. connie254

    connie254 Disney fanatic

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    I posted in the Resort area page about our one major issue on a bus with a dog. The dog had a "No petting service animal" sign on it, the person holding the leash let go of it and the dog went to my son wanting attention. Spooked my son a lot. The next day we were at the Orlando airport and the dogs were there at security. My son refused to go near that dog and I used the Passenger Support Specialist service, and we ended up going through the wheelchair line to avoid the dog.
    When the person responsible for the dog doesn't or won't have control of it and allows the dog beyond the space of the their party, that is when it shouldn't be my issue of getting my son "used" to dogs. It is their issue of being a responsible animal owner.
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2018
  7. cattywampus

    cattywampus DIS Veteran

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    Tinknalli is exactly right.

    As a frequent flier for work, more airports are using dogs in lieu of body scanners and shoe removal, et all. I see the same German shorthair pointer most mornings I fly out of my local airport. I will say the handler wants you to keep moving, unless the dog detects something so a brisk but not hurried pace is good.

    I welcome the dogs, as they really shorten the wait, but do see where someone could be fearful.

    I might suggest a visit to the airport just to watch the dog work (if this is feasible at your local airport). You might also contact your police department if they use dogs or, as others suggest, service dog trainers. If he could watch a true working dog for a good long time and see how well behaved and under control these dogs are and that they are not ill behaved pets, that might help. He doesn't even need to like them -- just see there is no danger and they only respond to their handler. They really don't want to interact with us.

    The unleashed "service dog" is an issue as is the entire non service dogs being put in a vest to pretend they are legit. Perhaps, that discussion can be had of real working dogs.

    A bit more delicate suggestion but you might want to be sure you are fully over your fear, as kids really key off parents and you may unconsciously be transmitting danger.

    I'm guessing TSA can make accommodations but it might me nice if he can work to overcome the issue over time too.

    Best of luck. I was scare of dogs when I was little and ran all the way back to my school in first grade after barking dog lunged after me. I now love dogs and rarely meet one I don't like. People... not so much.
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2018
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  8. connie254

    connie254 Disney fanatic

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    The one thing I neglected to mention is my son is developmentally delayed also. He got used to the neighbor's dog only because the neighbor knew how to interact with my son and she allowed him to go at his own pace to get used to her dog. She taught at the local county MRDD school and has two masters in special ed, and her dog was a Yorkie. My son has actually held that dog on his lap.
    When we were at MCO and waited for someone to help us, I saw the TSA dog, and it moved extremely fast. I asked my son if he would go into the line if I held his hands and he was emphactic and said no.
    Hopefully the next time we go, my son will forget what happened on the bus and will go past the TSA dog.
    I do have to say the TSA agent that I talked to, radioed for the PSS agent to come over. We stayed there about 7 minutes waiting for that person, the TSA agent told me it was taking too long and he said to follow him. He walked us over to the wheelchair/handicapped line and explained the situation to that agent. We had to check our IDs and boarding passes again but my son knows the body scanners and has no problem being touched if he sets it off (this time it was over his sternum and I set it off with my left shoulder, still don't know why).
     
  9. HarleenQ

    HarleenQ Mouseketeer

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    I don't think the situation on the bus with the dog is necessarily the norm, but I've noticed a hefty increase in dogs my last few trips. It might be worth looking into a rental car if your son is still a bit unsure of the bus, but it would also allow you to keep a controlled environment.
     
  10. Betty Rohrer

    Betty Rohrer DIS Veteran

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    the only problem with that is an I use the term "police" dog is trained to protect handler and a child/adult hitting at or yelling at that dog could have that dog take that child/person down which is what most are talking about. yes handler can order dog down but it happens that quick. how does your child handle drug dogs in school? you would not receive warning as most teachers don't know until that day.
     
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  11. cattywampus

    cattywampus DIS Veteran

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    I don't believe police dogs are trained to make decisions to attack on their own, even to protect the handler (I am no expert and could be wrong).


    I believe they are trained to follow commands and the handler would have to issue the command to attack. I think it would be a real problem if dogs were automatically attacking on the his/her perception of threat and that would outweigh the usefulness.
     
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2018
  12. Betty Rohrer

    Betty Rohrer DIS Veteran

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    yes they are from what handlers have told me they are trained to react and stop when told to and yes one of those was outside the gate at studios at WDW a few years back
     
  13. cattywampus

    cattywampus DIS Veteran

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    It is a small but important distinction with huge implications. I wouldn't be so picky but given this thread is about fear of dogs and mis-information could increase those fears, I called a local K-9 officer to confirm.

    Police dogs are not trained to decide to attack on their own and stopped by their handler's command, as you imply above.

    They are taught to attack on command. In fact, their entire training is about following commands, above all else.

    Once involved in a take down after the command is given, the dogs do protect their handler and will respond to suspects threatening the handler without further command, including attacking additional people that join into the fray (unless halted by the handler), but it all keys off the initial command. For example, if a dog is commanded to take down a suspect and that suspect's friend jumps in, the dog will attack the friend without additional command, if he perceives a threat to the handler. The dog is expected to immediately halt all attacks, if commanded to do so.

    While there could be the VERY rare situation of a dog acting aggressively to a perceived threat without command, that would be a sign of lack of training or a dog not fit for the job and the dog would be pulled from service.

    Further, it would be far fetched that a police dog would attack without command from a child swatting or even throwing things at the dog (though he definitely doesn't recommend it!).

    Think about how often a child or adult reached toward a police dog to pet it, even though it is prohibited. The liability of a dog that would attack without command in situations like that would kill the program.

    There are a few lawsuits and even a Supreme Court ruling on inappropriate bites, so it does happen, but rarely and even then, usually during a takedown.

    I just want to make sure the OP knows how safe they are around these dogs, even though her son's fear is very real. While I understand Betty's message that OP probably wants to try to prevent her son from doing anything that the dog could mistake for a threat against the handler, there is no huge cause for concern.
     
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2018
  14. Betty Rohrer

    Betty Rohrer DIS Veteran

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    then why was a told by handler that my reaching to get my keys from daughter as she was handing to me could cause dog to think it was going to be hit it and it could go after me. we were a few feet from dog as it was on duty by the gate at WDW Studios. handler knew what we were doing. the other handler I talked with was a police dog in our area that was mainly used for drugs. he also said if dog was "attacked" or officer "attacked" dog would go after person without command but could be stopped by command which were not in English. have watch training demos where guy in training suit teased dog where dog went after "suspect" and dog stopped when commanded but dog was very fast to protect handler. liability would also take in consideration that something was used to hit or attempt to hit dog ie child throwing at or hitting at dog because parent was not controlling their child. in an earlier thread a mother asked what she could do for her special needs child who became upset and swinging if I remember correctly where handler yelled for child to move on quickly. where I guessed handler did not want dog to take child down. I am pretty sure handler would not send dog in that case
     
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2018
  15. cattywampus

    cattywampus DIS Veteran

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    I don't know why you were told that and I don't really want to debate, as this thread isn't about causing more anxiety and we are getting way off topic.

    I will ask if it makes sense to anyone that dogs would be used in a high tourist area with a ton of children, who could be set off by something as simple as handing your keys to your daughter. The liability and risk would far outweigh any perceived benefit.

    But, since neither of us is in expert in this area and we both have the best interest of the OP and her son at heart, I will join you in hoping there are alternatives to exposure to the security dogs and hope he can find a way to reduce his fear.
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2018
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