Taking kids out of school to go to Disney. Horribly irresponsible or acceptable in some situations?

Figvention

Earning My Ears
Joined
Jun 12, 2018
Our DD is a 5th grade straight A honors student, we have been taking her out for a week during the school year for a WDW vacation every year. The summer Florida heat /daily rain ruins the vacation for us. We always make sure we get the homework ahead of time and she does it while eating breakfast everyday.

It’s your job as a parent to make sure she stays current in school, WDW or not.
 

Orionreplay

Earning My Ears
Joined
Nov 21, 2019
My daughter is in AP courses, 7th grade. My son struggles with all schoolwork, 4th grade. Both middle school and elementary school were fine with us leaving outside the normal vacation periods. My daughter had a boat load of school work to complete the weekend prior to us leaving and I believe she even had a creative writing assignment while at Disney.

We feared some form of school negativity but actually encountered none. Meanwhile we were at Disney and there were scores and scores of kids, tweens, and young adults, so we were very clearly not alone in our decision.
 

mjkacmom

DIS Veteran
Joined
Feb 20, 2006
Our DD is a 5th grade straight A honors student, we have been taking her out for a week during the school year for a WDW vacation every year. The summer Florida heat /daily rain ruins the vacation for us. We always make sure we get the homework ahead of time and she does it while eating breakfast everyday.

It’s your job as a parent to make sure she stays current in school, WDW or not.
You should not expect teachers to make up homework packets ahead of time, although it’s nice that they did.
 
  • Summer2018

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jun 29, 2017
    You should not expect teachers to make up homework packets ahead of time, although it’s nice that they did.
    Thanks for saying that.

    We teachers never have enough hours in the day to accomplish our responsibilities. It is already inconvenient having to try to catch a student up with everything they missed while they are out. Having to customize a work-packet that couldn't possibly make up for actual time and hands-on experiences in class is really time-consuming. When I know someone will be absent for a vacation, all they get from me is the homework that they will miss. Since they won't be present for my teaching, it is up to the parents to tutor the child. Unless they are at the top of the class, it rarely works out well. Then I have to work with them individually to make up for what they missed. When they are ill, it is one thing, but if I'm being inconvenienced so they can have a happy happy fun time in WDW, I'm not a happy teacher.

    Just my personal opinion based on nearly 20 years of teaching...
     

    Figvention

    Earning My Ears
    Joined
    Jun 12, 2018
    I understand where you both are coming from but all the teacher has to do is forward a link to her chromebook for that weeks lesson package.
     

    Summer2018

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jun 29, 2017
    I understand where you both are coming from but all the teacher has to do is forward a link to her chromebook for that weeks lesson package.
    Talk about an oversimplification of a Teacher's professional responsibilities.

    You are making the assumption that all schools and all homes have the necessary technology to do that.

    My lesson plans sit on my desk with a copy in the Principal's office. Not only do families not have access, they wouldn't understand what they were reading if they did. Most parents would not be able to implement my lessons. Your comments underestimate the teaching and learning that occurs between a Teacher with a Master's Degree and his/her students on a given day.
     

    Figvention

    Earning My Ears
    Joined
    Jun 12, 2018
    Know that I respect your profession but the “teacher martyr” act hurts your cause... it burns people out. Every white collar worker I know works 50 hours a week and only gets paid for 40. It’s not right and I don’t agree with it. The woo is me is old hat, your profession isn’t the only one under the thumb these days.

    Unity is the key, not singling yourself out ALL THE TIME. It’s hard out there for most workers these days, nobody makes you become or stay in education. Can’t complain about YOUR choices all the time and expect infinite sympathy.
     
  • LSUmiss

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Sep 8, 2014
    Know that I respect your profession but the “teacher martyr” act hurts your cause... it burns people out. Every white collar worker I know works 50 hours a week and only gets paid for 40. It’s not right and I don’t agree with it. The woo is me is old hat, your profession isn’t the only one under the thumb these days.

    Unity is the key, not singling yourself out ALL THE TIME. It’s hard out there for most workers these days, nobody makes you become or stay in education. Can’t complain about YOUR choices all the time and expect infinite sympathy.
    I know you will probably get flamed for this, but I couldn’t agree more. While not a teacher, I work in the school system now. My job is just as stressful as it was outside the system; however, the hours are a lot better & I am off waaaayy more. I work 185 days a year. I used to work at least 260. And, like teachers, I do a lot of work after hours, but it’s at home & paperwork which is much better than being stuck in the actual office 50-60 hours a week like many ppl I know.
     

    Summer2018

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jun 29, 2017
    Know that I respect your profession but the “teacher martyr” act hurts your cause... it burns people out. Every white collar worker I know works 50 hours a week and only gets paid for 40. It’s not right and I don’t agree with it. The woo is me is old hat, your profession isn’t the only one under the thumb these days.

    Unity is the key, not singling yourself out ALL THE TIME. It’s hard out there for most workers these days, nobody makes you become or stay in education. Can’t complain about YOUR choices all the time and expect infinite sympathy.
    Wow.
     

    Summer2018

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jun 29, 2017
    Know that I respect your profession but the “teacher martyr” act hurts your cause... it burns people out. Every white collar worker I know works 50 hours a week and only gets paid for 40. It’s not right and I don’t agree with it. The woo is me is old hat, your profession isn’t the only one under the thumb these days.

    Unity is the key, not singling yourself out ALL THE TIME. It’s hard out there for most workers these days, nobody makes you become or stay in education. Can’t complain about YOUR choices all the time and expect infinite sympathy.
    I am not a martyr. I am not looking for sympathy. In fact, I LOVE my profession, especially when I’m in my classroom with my students teaching and even learning from them.
     

    Summer2018

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jun 29, 2017
    I know you will probably get flamed for this, but I couldn’t agree more. While not a teacher, I work in the school system now. My job is just as stressful as it was outside the system; however, the hours are a lot better & I am off waaaayy more. I work 185 days a year. I used to work at least 260. And, like teachers, I do a lot of work after hours, but it’s at home & paperwork which is much better than being stuck in the actual office 50-60 hours a week like many ppl I know.
    I have been an executive assistant, a travel agent, and a group home manager. Then, at 37, I became a teacher after working a full time job while pursuing my bachelor’s and master’s degrees.

    I know all about long hours and hard work with only 2 weeks off a year.

    I won’t waste time elaborating on the physical and emotional toll on teachers. I know my audience.

    Yes. I love SUMMER VACATION. It’s the only way that I can rejuvenate myself and continue to work in the honorable profession as a Teacher.

    Happy Thanksgiving.
     
  • Heather07438

    WDW Apprentice
    Joined
    Oct 20, 2015
    We do a compromise. While we'd LOVE to take a full normal 8 day trip at WDW, we've done 4 trips over the past 5 years where we only went 5 days.

    We take DS out of school for 2 or 3 days and add that to a weekend. This next trip, we'll pick him up after school gets out at 2pm (may take him at beginning of 8th period 1:15p which is Gym) on a Tuesday. He will be out Wed Thurs Fri, and we return home Sunday evening by 9pm. He's a senior. I know his class time is valuable. We also don't know what life has in store so we seize the day and try to squeeze time into what's left of his youth. One child goes too quickly!
     

    LSUmiss

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Sep 8, 2014
    I have been an executive assistant, a travel agent, and a group home manager. Then, at 37, I became a teacher after working a full time job while pursuing my bachelor’s and master’s degrees.

    I know all about long hours and hard work with only 2 weeks off a year.

    I won’t waste time elaborating on the physical and emotional toll on teachers. I know my audience.

    Yes. I love SUMMER VACATION. It’s the only way that I can rejuvenate myself and continue to work in the honorable profession as a Teacher.

    Happy Thanksgiving.
    I can appreciate that. But, there are also many other honorable careers that get less time off & don’t get that rejuvenation period...nurses, social workers, first responders, etc. Think that is the pp’s point. Of these helping professions, teachers seem to make the most “noise”.
     



    Connect

    Disney News and Updates

    Get Daily Email Updates


    Top