Taking kids out of school to go to Disney. Horribly irresponsible or acceptable in some situations?

Karlrob

Earning My Ears
Joined
Jul 4, 2019
As an elementary school teacher of over 40 years - yes do it. I have seen that children on vacation with their parents gain so much in the time spent with their parents and family. It gives them a broader view of the world and other people. When my 4-5-6 graders went I even refused to give them work, other than a pleasure book to read. It is their vacation also they need to enjoy it, and I can catch them up when they return. That is my job.
 

catomi01

Earning My Ears
Joined
Sep 23, 2009
I know time's change and each individual situation is different, but when I was in school (20-30 years ago now), my mother took me out of school about once a year (usually for a week) for our annual trips. Probably every 3rd or 4th year was Disney, but we'd hit something else in the "off-years" for a similar time period. On a budget, it made a lot more sense to travel "off-peak" and avoid the busy summer and holiday weeks.

She'd always make sure to discuss it with the teachers, and most would provide some homework or assignments to complete to keep up to date with the rest of the class, and I don't think it was ever really an issue. Conversely, because we knew I'd be missing at least a week a year for vacation, I became better at avoiding "easy" sick days - I did miss many days with a mild or fake headache or anything like that, so in a way it got me ready for the "real world" - at work I'm not staying home because of anything mild - I'd rather save up my time to do something I want to do and/or a real emergency down the line.

I know times change, and I'd defer to the parents on the board, but my own personal experience is that it didn't have any negative consequences for me, and allowed my mom to give me 10-15 trips we might not otherwise have enjoyed together (along with all the memories and everything else associated).
 
  • eeyoreandtink

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Mar 24, 2014
    Ok so I think you’re saying some private schools in your area don’t officially offer AP b/c they feel their academics are better or more rigorous on their own? So if that’s the case, that’s my point. My academics in high school even in the late 90s were very rigorous. While AP wasn’t officially offered, I (and many of my peers) tested out of many freshman level courses before we started college during spring testing. On average, we had high ACT scores & a few girls who got the highest score possible (36 at the time-not sure if it changed). Perhaps, some schools are even more rigorous now, but it still largely depends on the kid. I was number 3 in my class in HS & was very comfortable missing school. I even missed a week of grad school in college for my wedding & homeymoon (to wdw of course!). So, it definitely still depends on the kid & school program.
    Are we talking about Sacred Heart? If so, that is a completely unique situation as far as what was offered/ required in the 90's. We had a family member go to Harvard from there in that time period. Even then, what she took, versus what they are doing now is vastly different. (We have family enrolled now). It is much more rigorous now. Her nieces are covering material early in high school that she got as senior.

    It was pretty easy to test out of college courses at the time at public universities, particularly the 101's. I took none of them. I got credit for several 201/202 courses through AP though.

    I was speaking to nation wide selective academies. It has become a trend of late for some of the most prestigious to steer away from any kind of organized AP/ IB program to offer their on special "we can do it better" program.
     

    LSUmiss

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Sep 8, 2014
    Are we talking about Sacred Heart? If so, that is a completely unique situation as far as what was offered/ required in the 90's. We had a family member got to Harvard from there in that time period. Even then, what she took, versus what they are doing now is vastly different. (We have family enrolled now). It is much more rigorous now. Her nieces are covering material early in high school that she got as senior.

    It was pretty easy to test out of college courses at the time at public universities, particularly the 101's. I took none of them. I got credit for several 201/202 courses through AP though.
    I don’t think sacred heart is unique compared to similar catholic schools here with maybe a few exceptions. Unique compared to the public schools here, definitely. Perhaps it’s more rigorous than in the 90s, but I have friends with kids at sacred heart now & other catholic high schools who still take their kids out. I have a friend who teaches at another catholic hs & said kids often miss a week for vacation. So maybe it’s more rigorous than the 90s, but my point is that it was still rigorous then even if it’s more rigorous now so it still depends on the kid.
     

    Heather07438

    WDW Apprentice
    Joined
    Oct 20, 2015
    I feel y'all in this thread. So many factors to consider.
    This is the decision we made this year:

    DS HS senior will be missing 3 days of school in December for WDW.
    We're picking him up at the end of school on Tues at 2:05pm and going direct to airport.
    We're returning Sunday night, hopefully home by 10-11pm, school tomorrow 7am.

    We made the compromise to shorten the trip to 5 days, even though that results in a costlier average expense per trip day. We follow the school portal grades & assignments in real time, making sure he stays on the ball. They grow so fast and we never know what life has in store. The opportunity to share in this with him at this point in life is important to us as a family.
     

    Kestryl

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    Mar 29, 2019
    But then who takes AP AB calculus and AP BC calculus? They are high school courses.
    Are you under the impression that most students take AP Calc? Because not everyone takes AP Calc. Heck, not every school offers either version of AP Calc.

    Does every kid at your children’s school take AP Calc?

    In many cases, the kids taking AP Calc are those who got on the honor track and took Algebra I in 8th grade. Some skipped a math class by testing out. Depending on the school schedule and offerings, they may be able to cram two math classes in each year.

    My husband’s current school does semesters with 4 classes each- the “standard” math classes are one semester with the year’s worth of material. It’s possible to take Algebra I in semester one then Geometry in semester two, but it’s not like math is the only required class. Also, many, many kids struggle with the single-semester Algebra I class, and burnout is common.
     
  • eeyoreandtink

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Mar 24, 2014
    Are you under the impression that most students take AP Calc? Because not everyone takes AP Calc. Heck, not every school offers either version of AP Calc.

    Does every kid at your children’s school take AP Calc?

    In many cases, the kids taking AP Calc are those who got on the honor track and took Algebra I in 8th grade. Some skipped a math class by testing out. Depending on the school schedule and offerings, they may be able to cram two math classes in each year.

    My husband’s current school does semesters with 4 classes each- the “standard” math classes are one semester with the year’s worth of material. It’s possible to take Algebra I in semester one then Geometry in semester two, but it’s not like math is the only required class. Also, many, many kids struggle with the single-semester Algebra I class, and burnout is common.
    Exactly. There is a HUGE spread as far as what kids are doing in high school, and that spread is ever evolving. When I was in school, maybe the top 10% of students took AP Cal. There weren't AB and BC at the time, but it would have been the equivalent of AB. You didn't need Algebra 1 to graduate, just Math 9 and Consumer Math. That was standard for our state and the surrounding states.

    Now, 30% of DD's class will take Calculus AB. That would be closer to 50% at the private schools in the area. Half of those kids will go on to BC before they graduate. Algebra 1 is mandatory in the 9th grade, and you must complete a minimum of Algebra 1, geometry, Algebra 2 and one more math choice to graduate. Standards have radically changed, but there is still a big spread in what you can choose to do.
     

    eeyoreandtink

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Mar 24, 2014
    I don’t think sacred heart is unique compared to similar catholic schools here with maybe a few exceptions. Unique compared to the public schools here, definitely. Perhaps it’s more rigorous than in the 90s, but I have friends with kids at sacred heart now & other catholic high schools who still take their kids out. I have a friend who teaches at another catholic hs & said kids often miss a week for vacation. So maybe it’s more rigorous than the 90s, but my point is that it was still rigorous then even if it’s more rigorous now so it still depends on the kid.
    I guess we just have differing perspectives on the same school. I do feel its pretty different from other Catholic schools in the area. There is a good bit of variability of programs, even within the one school. Someone in the regular program will have a vastly different experience than someone on the advanced track.
     

    LSUmiss

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Sep 8, 2014
    I guess we just have differing perspectives on the same school. I do feel its pretty different from other Catholic schools in the area. There is a good bit of variability of programs, even within the one school. Someone in the regular program will have a vastly different experience than someone on the advanced track.
    Do you have experience with the other schools?
     
  • eeyoreandtink

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Mar 24, 2014
    I’d be curious to know those other schools you’re comparing.
    there are a lot where we know kids. These come to mind quickly
    Rummel and Chapelle in Metairie
    one graduated from Carmel several years ago
    we have several who went to Jesuit, but none in the advanced programs so I cannot speak to that.
    Other than that, being around a lot of kids in the Catholic system in New Orleans, hearing them talk about school ect. Almost alll DH's family is in NO except his branch in Baton Rouge.
     

    spiders

    Earning My Ears
    Joined
    Oct 19, 2019
    If the kid is doing well in school then missing a few days isn’t going to hurt. I’ll be pulling my kids out next year. They have 3 days off and I’m going to pull them out for an extra 2 to make it a week.

    I’m not remorseful nor do I have any explaining to do. I work in a 24/7/365 environment. I work Christmas, weekends, I miss birthdays and I miss barbecues. This is what works for my schedule and if somebody doesn’t like it then I’ve got zero cares to give.
     

    LSUmiss

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Sep 8, 2014
    there are a lot where we know kids. These come to mind quickly
    Rummel and Chapelle in Metairie
    one graduated from Carmel several years ago
    we have several who went to Jesuit, but none in the advanced programs so I cannot speak to that.
    Other than that, being around a lot of kids in the Catholic system in New Orleans, hearing them talk about school ect. Almost alll DH's family is in NO except his branch in Baton Rouge.
    Gotcha. The first 2 I’ll give you. I wasn’t even thinking of them b/c I don’t know anyone who goes or has gone there. From my experience, they’re not known for their academics. But mt Carmel used to have a pretty decent program. My friend teaches there & from what I’ve seen, they still do. Now Jesuit is a whole different story. It is an excellent school. I would say the best school in this city. But compared to other areas, I have no idea. It also depends on the goal. Most ppl here are good with getting into lsu or Tulane & getting a degree in a field that will make them a good living. All of my friends who went to Jesuit are Drs or engineers & make a decent living. A lot of ppl here don’t even apply for places like Harvard b/c they have no desire to live that far from here. My family has attended LSU for generations so it was the only school on my radar. I considered no other college. Your DH being from BR & no longer living here or close is kind of an anomaly. I’m sure you probably know that with some of his relatives being from NOLA. I chose a career based on what I could make a decent amount of money doing & stay here. All of my friends & family pretty much have done the same. So coming full circle...here, the curriculum is not that much more rigorous than when I was in school so here ppl are usually comfortable with taking their kids out just like our parents did when we were in school. And, personally, I think some of the stuff you & other posters have mentioned of things required of high school & middle school kids is just over-the-top. I don’t think that prepares kids for anything except being stressed & overwhelmed. As you probably know, we live in our own little world down here & after reading what some of y’all go through, I’m good with it lol!
     

    mjkacmom

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Feb 20, 2006
    Are you under the impression that most students take AP Calc? Because not everyone takes AP Calc. Heck, not every school offers either version of AP Calc.

    Does every kid at your children’s school take AP Calc?

    In many cases, the kids taking AP Calc are those who got on the honor track and took Algebra I in 8th grade. Some skipped a math class by testing out. Depending on the school schedule and offerings, they may be able to cram two math classes in each year.

    My husband’s current school does semesters with 4 classes each- the “standard” math classes are one semester with the year’s worth of material. It’s possible to take Algebra I in semester one then Geometry in semester two, but it’s not like math is the only required class. Also, many, many kids struggle with the single-semester Algebra I class, and burnout is common.
    As a previous poster stated, we have 3 tiers here, algebra 1 7th, algebra 1 8th, algebra 1 freshman. Languages also start 7th grade, dd16 is in AP Spanish (her twin brother only Spanish 4). My 23 year old did not take AP calculus and took AP stat instead, a mistake since she only had pre calc before college (business major, accounting, lots of math). Kids here really try hard to test into algebra for 7th grade, because the pre-algebra teacher is horrible, and most kids need tutors.
     

    eeyoreandtink

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Mar 24, 2014
    Gotcha. The first 2 I’ll give you. I wasn’t even thinking of them b/c I don’t know anyone who goes or has gone there. From my experience, they’re not known for their academics. But mt Carmel used to have a pretty decent program. My friend teaches there & from what I’ve seen, they still do. Now Jesuit is a whole different story. It is an excellent school. I would say the best school in this city. But compared to other areas, I have no idea. It also depends on the goal. Most ppl here are good with getting into lsu or Tulane & getting a degree in a field that will make them a good living. All of my friends who went to Jesuit are Drs or engineers & make a decent living. A lot of ppl here don’t even apply for places like Harvard b/c they have no desire to live that far from here. My family has attended LSU for generations so it was the only school on my radar. I considered no other college. Your DH being from BR & no longer living here or close is kind of an anomaly. I’m sure you probably know that with some of his relatives being from NOLA. I chose a career based on what I could make a decent amount of money doing & stay here. All of my friends & family pretty much have done the same. So coming full circle...here, the curriculum is not that much more rigorous than when I was in school so here ppl are usually comfortable with taking their kids out just like our parents did when we were in school. And, personally, I think some of the stuff you & other posters have mentioned of things required of high school & middle school kids is just over-the-top. I don’t think that prepares kids for anything except being stressed & overwhelmed. As you probably know, we live in our own little world down here & after reading what some of y’all go through, I’m good with it lol!
    Yes, NO and that area of Louisiana is a different beast all together. Our family that went to Jesuit were D1 sports recruits. It was totally different for them, but I know SEVERAL guys who went there who were not athletes and are nowhere close to Drs or engineers. All of DH's branch of the family are scattered. Pretty much all over the country, and overseas. We have had family at LSU since the 30's, when it was still Newcomb College and LSU. DH was the oldest and the first to go elsewhere. I get it, but I do think things in the area have changed since DH was in high school and college, based on what I see. More of DH's NO family is branching out. The kids are looking past LSU or Tulane.
    We looked at Tulane for about 3 seconds. No way we are paying $80,000 a year! I don't know why anyone would pay what they are asking, even in state without serious scholarship money, which you basically have to have a 35-36 ACT and comparable coursework to even have a hope at. We have looked at LSU as an option for DD as well. Requirements for scholarships at LSU have stepped up a lot too. The ACT needed for academic scholarships is higher than when DH applied, and you can no longer get more than 20% of the $12,000 a year in out of state fees waived. You need a 32-33 ACT to get your tuition paid, much less room, board, books ect. That's going to take a serious resume. The situation, even at state schools, is highly competitive. That's why kids are in these programs.

    I think it definitely prepares them for college. Kids who have gone through the program DD is in come back saying how thankful they are for being prepared in this way. It makes college much less stressful and more enjoyable for them, even at high pressure schools. While others are stressing over getting it together freshman year, they are fully prepared and can relax and settle in.
     

    LSUmiss

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Sep 8, 2014
    Yes, NO and that area of Louisiana is a different beast all together. Our family that went to Jesuit were D1 sports recruits. It was totally different for them, but I know SEVERAL guys who went there who were not athletes and are nowhere close to Drs or engineers. All of DH's branch of the family are scattered. Pretty much all over the country, and overseas. We have had family at LSU since the 30's, when it was still Newcomb College and LSU. DH was the oldest and the first to go elsewhere. I get it, but I do think things in the area have changed since DH was in high school and college, based on what I see. More of DH's NO family is branching out. The kids are looking past LSU or Tulane.
    We looked at Tulane for about 3 seconds. No way we are paying $80,000 a year! I don't know why anyone would pay what they are asking, even in state without serious scholarship money, which you basically have to have a 35-36 ACT and comparable coursework to even have a hope at. We have looked at LSU as an option for DD as well. Requirements for scholarships at LSU have stepped up a lot too. The ACT needed for academic scholarships is higher than when DH applied, and you can no longer get more than 20% of the $12,000 a year in out of state fees waived. You need a 32-33 ACT to get your tuition paid, much less room, board, books ect. That's going to take a serious resume. The situation, even at state schools, is highly competitive. That's why kids are in these programs.

    I think it definitely prepares them for college. Kids who have gone through the program DD is in come back saying how thankful they are for being prepared in this way. It makes college much less stressful and more enjoyable for them, even at high pressure schools. While others are stressing over getting it together freshman year, they are fully prepared and can relax and settle in.
    Yes D1 sports are a whole other animal & discussion! That’s interesting about branching out b/c the majority of ppl I know here are still mostly staying put. For us being in the state (at least for now), we still have the TOPS program to pay tuition & in-state tuition is way cheaper. Good luck to your DD.
     

    eeyoreandtink

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Mar 24, 2014
    Yes D1 sports are a whole other animal & discussion! That’s interesting about branching out b/c the majority of ppl I know here are still mostly staying put. For us being in the state (at least for now), we still have the TOPS program to pay tuition & in-state tuition is way cheaper. Good luck to your DD.
    TOPS only pays for a public university though, right?
     



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