Disney Fantasy - Mechanical issues 7/8/2019

truck1

Growing older but not up.
Joined
Jul 7, 2009
We did an at-sea line shaft bearing replacement one time and that had a similar profile as to what Fantasy did. Slowed for a period of time, then up and running. We had to stop and lock the shaft. The bearings are used on support structures within the ship as it reaches from the engines/thrust bearing (load transfer to the hull) to the shaft seal where the shaft penetrates the hull and runs through the strut to the propeller. Maybe it is, and maybe it isn't. It took us about 12 hours to roll the old one out, rig the new one into place then roll the new one into the bearing housing. All this was done at sea with only a temporary slowdown while our shaft was stopped.
Disneys ships dont use standard bearings. I'll try and find the article Scott sent me but there different. They also use seawater as the lube instead of oil. From what the article said the Magic which got them when she was built still has her original bearings and shafts. Theyve been installed on all 4 ships and probably the next 3. Theres been very little wear on them. I want to say Princess uses them also, and had similar results and changed them at 20 years only because they were 20 years old but could have gone for another 20 with the limited wear theyd incurred to that point

Found it

Shaft Bearing

I take it back. Princess was recommended to change at the next drydock but did it early since the ship was already high and dry. Disneys as of 15 were still in spec
 
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truck1

Growing older but not up.
Joined
Jul 7, 2009
Not soon enough, apparently.

As far as the vibration issues: Seems no one FB is willing to admit they exist. And, they have been present since christening and weren't fixed the last time it dry-docked. I don't know that it CAN be repaired. At least not without rebuilding a large portion of the rear of the ship.
Depends on what the reasoning is. Shes only had 1 drydock since launch. Theres any number of things that could cause it, and some of them are not off the shelf or easily fabricated. It's possible they found the issue last time and may be waiting on the fabrication of a new piece, which may take several months to make.

Now keep in mind theres 7 motors and engines that power the ships.
2 are electric drive motors that are actually connected to the shafts. These are the ones that move the ship from point a to b. Theres 5 diesel engines connected to generators that actually create the power to run the ship. If for what ever reason they need to be replaced, they can cut a hole in the side of the ship, slide the engine out and slide a new in. Takes about 7 to 10 days.Depends on the yards and crew. some are better at it then others. Been done several times already. The Magic has had at least 1 engine replaced. Theyve added engines same way to several RCL ships also.

As far as the actual issue, I cant put my finger on it. Most if the obvious things are easy. Prop blades can be swapped in water. Same thing with retorquing the prop hub If it was an alignment issue, they could have fixed it last time in drydock. Which to me means either its something that needs extensive fabrication or something that needs extensive planning and they didnt have that in drydock last time
 
  • ember1205

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    Apr 15, 2019
    Yes. We were also offered the 20% off deal. I hope that stacks with my placeholder cruise 10%
    Someone on a social media site whose name qualifies as foul language (and can't be mentioned here) stated that they were given the 20% off and that it would STACK with the regular placeholder. Not sure how accurate that is.

    Depends on what the reasoning is. Shes only had 1 drydock since launch. Theres any number of things that could cause it, and some of them are not off the shelf or easily fabricated. It's possible they found the issue last time and may be waiting on the fabrication of a new piece, which may take several months to make.

    Now keep in mind theres 7 motors and engines that power the ships.
    2 are electric drive motors that are actually connected to the shafts. These are the ones that move the ship from point a to b. Theres 5 diesel engines connected to generators that actually create the power to run the ship. If for what ever reason they need to be replaced, they can cut a hole in the side of the ship, slide the engine out and slide a new in. Takes about 7 to 10 days.Depends on the yards and crew. some are better at it then others. Been done several times already. The Magic has had at least 1 engine replaced. Theyve added engines same way to several RCL ships also.

    As far as the actual issue, I cant put my finger on it. Most if the obvious things are easy. Prop blades can be swapped in water. Same thing with retorquing the prop hub If it was an alignment issue, they could have fixed it last time in drydock. Which to me means either its something that needs extensive fabrication or something that needs extensive planning and they didnt have that in drydock last time
    Whatever the issue ultimately is, there's a harmonic issue of sorts as the vibrations start light, increase in intensity, and then fade again. It's a constant, repeating cycle that takes about 10-15 seconds to complete.

    When the vibrations are light, it would actually feel a little soothing when you tried to sleep. When they peak in intensity, it's like a Magic Bed possessed by the Devil.
     

    truck1

    Growing older but not up.
    Joined
    Jul 7, 2009
    Someone on a social media site whose name qualifies as foul language (and can't be mentioned here) stated that they were given the 20% off and that it would STACK with the regular placeholder. Not sure how accurate that is.



    Whatever the issue ultimately is, there's a harmonic issue of sorts as the vibrations start light, increase in intensity, and then fade again. It's a constant, repeating cycle that takes about 10-15 seconds to complete.

    When the vibrations are light, it would actually feel a little soothing when you tried to sleep. When they peak in intensity, it's like a Magic Bed possessed by the Devil.
    I know. I was on her inaugural and watched it in my water glass. It also varies in severity with seas state speed and local conditions. Which just got me thinking.Im wondering if it's the drive motor itself or something in or on the motor which is a very expensive fix, though doable, but could be done. Which of it is motor related, they could be arguing over who gets to pay for it If it's a manufacturing defect, the manufacturer gets the bill, if it's an incorrect installation, MW gets that bill. If it wasnt properly operated, or maintained, Disney gets that one. I want to say this drive motors are millions each. There not cheap by any means. As a comparison, a boating forum I'm on was showing a boat that sank off Puerto Rico and was shipped to Delaware or Baltimore to be rebuilt. The Mann diesel engine that are brand new but smaller versions of what is in crusie ships were 750000 each. They dropped 2 new ones in. The bigger cousins are probably in the 20 million range easy. Even for the electric drive motor
     

    dad of 3 addicted to DCL

    Waiting for January
    Joined
    Aug 14, 2017
    Disneys ships dont use standard bearings. I'll try and find the article Scott sent me but there different. They also use seawater as the lube instead of oil. From what the article said the Magic which got them when she was built still has her original bearings and shafts. Theyve been installed on all 4 ships and probably the next 3. Theres been very little wear on them. I want to say Princess uses them also, and had similar results and changed them at 20 years only because they were 20 years old but could have gone for another 20 with the limited wear theyd incurred to that point

    Found it

    Shaft Bearing

    I take it back. Princess was recommended to change at the next drydock but did it early since the ship was already high and dry. Disneys as of 15 were still in spec
    Fascinating article. I wonder if we could use it on non-cruise ships or if the speed and frequent speed changes would be problematic. Either way, very interesting. Thanks!

    ETA: the article referenced LSBs, I wonder if her thrust bearing and reduction gears are the usual lube oil. I don't see how those could be converted to sea water lubrication.
     
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  • dad of 3 addicted to DCL

    Waiting for January
    Joined
    Aug 14, 2017
    I know. I was on her inaugural and watched it in my water glass. It also varies in severity with seas state speed and local conditions. Which just got me thinking.Im wondering if it's the drive motor itself or something in or on the motor which is a very expensive fix, though doable, but could be done. Which of it is motor related, they could be arguing over who gets to pay for it If it's a manufacturing defect, the manufacturer gets the bill, if it's an incorrect installation, MW gets that bill. If it wasnt properly operated, or maintained, Disney gets that one. I want to say this drive motors are millions each. There not cheap by any means. As a comparison, a boating forum I'm on was showing a boat that sank off Puerto Rico and was shipped to Delaware or Baltimore to be rebuilt. The Mann diesel engine that are brand new but smaller versions of what is in crusie ships were 750000 each. They dropped 2 new ones in. The bigger cousins are probably in the 20 million range easy. Even for the electric drive motor
    I served on a ship that had a bent prop on a screw. You wouldn't believe the shake, rattle and roll because of that one ding. Something as simple as wrapping a chain around the screw can impinge on the brass screws. We happened to hit submarine, but that's another story...
     

    truck1

    Growing older but not up.
    Joined
    Jul 7, 2009
    I served on a ship that had a bent prop on a screw. You wouldn't believe the shake, rattle and roll because of that one ding. Something as simple as wrapping a chain around the screw can impinge on the brass screws. We happened to hit submarine, but that's another story...

    Dont think it's a prop issue Its somewhere else. I've felt the same effects from bad props before, but this is different. Maybe not the same source... It also came with the ship from Germany. Some crew that came over with her felt it during her crossing. Shes had divers under her several times for her in water inspections, and so far no blades have been changed out. She been high and dry once also and any number of people should have seen something.
     

    truck1

    Growing older but not up.
    Joined
    Jul 7, 2009
    Fascinating article. I wonder if we could use it on non-cruise ships or if the speed and frequent speed changes would be problematic. Either way, very interesting. Thanks!

    ETA: the article referenced LSBs, I wonder if her thrust bearing and reduction gears are the usual lube oil. I don't see how those could be converted to sea water lubrication.
    I dont see why they couldnt use it on non cruise ships. The only thing I could see from the article that could be a potential issue would be water quality. A ship serving near shore where theres more sediment etc could have a negative effect on things. But blue water ships shouldn't see an issue. At least in theory.

    Found this. I actually googled the site

    CCOMPAC
     

    scgustafson

    DIS Veteran/DCL Platinum
    Joined
    Feb 27, 2014
    I served on a ship that had a bent prop on a screw. You wouldn't believe the shake, rattle and roll because of that one ding. Something as simple as wrapping a chain around the screw can impinge on the brass screws. We happened to hit submarine, but that's another story...
    You didn't happen to be onboard USS New Orleans when she and USS Hartford collided in the Strait of Hormuz in March of 2009?
     
  • truck1

    Growing older but not up.
    Joined
    Jul 7, 2009
    Dang, that’s where we will be on Saturday. Thanks for the heads up, I would rather go in with the right expectations.

    Theres a simple solution if you smell sewage in your cabin. Go in to the bathroom, and the half bath. On the floor are floor drains. Put 2 or 3 cups of water I each drained and the smells will most likely go away. Theres p traps in the floor that have a tendency to dry out which allows the gas to escape.
     

    BHCruise

    Earning My Ears
    Joined
    Apr 9, 2019
    Theres a simple solution if you smell sewage in your cabin. Go in to the bathroom, and the half bath. On the floor are floor drains. Put 2 or 3 cups of water I each drained and the smells will most likely go away. Theres p traps in the floor that have a tendency to dry out which allows the gas to escape.
    Good tip, I’ll be sure and try that. Thank you.
     

    DayOhDisMom

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    Apr 11, 2013
    Oh man, that would drive me nuts. We almost got an oceanview on Deck 7, but this definitely make me glad we sprung for a verandah to air out the smells.
    We had a verandah smell was not strong very faint. At first it was hard to tell what it was at first did not always come from bathroom. And it did not stay around long. We also had the room next door in 2017 it had some vibration no smell. Never smelled sewage out side stateroom.
     

    ember1205

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    Apr 15, 2019
    Theres a simple solution if you smell sewage in your cabin. Go in to the bathroom, and the half bath. On the floor are floor drains. Put 2 or 3 cups of water I each drained and the smells will most likely go away. Theres p traps in the floor that have a tendency to dry out which allows the gas to escape.
    I thought the system was vacuum-based and didn't use the traditional traps? And, if it IS vacuum-based, then that means that the toilet can't be inter-connected with anything else or the vacuum system wouldn't work properly and/or it would constantly be sucking all of the water out of the drain traps.
     

    IncredibleKate

    Earning My Ears
    Joined
    Mar 9, 2019
    Wow! I sure wish we would have gotten a $200obc and 20% off when we sailed in May of 2017 and had such a terrible experience with their "mechanical issues." (NOT a terrible cruise though, we still had a great time) Not only did our itinerary get changed (not as big of a deal), but we weren't able to board until 4:30pm, sailaway was at 11:30 PM (so no party), and we dealt with electrical issues off and on the entire week. We were compensated $25pp for "first day lunch" and that is it! Sure hope these folks don't come back complaining, DCL stepped up on this one.
    Hey I was on this cruise! We missed a port on that cruise too, we were supposed to go to Tortola and instead went to St. Thomas and San Juan.
     

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