What qualifies?

eplcreel

Earning My Ears
Joined
Jul 10, 2021
I have always wondered this, my husband, has had multiple strokes over the years. Results have been permeant vision loss in the left side of both eyes and the last one left him with some muscle control loss on his left side which is kind of a balance issue. What all qualifies as a disability with Disney? We've never really looked because he's a younger guy (or was in the past when we went) so he's always just toughed it out but now that we are older the thought of 6 days of walking around is a bit more daunting.
 

design_mom

probably more like my dad than I care to admit
Joined
Feb 1, 2007
Disability accommodations are needs based, not diagnosis based. So there is no list of "what qualifies."

If it's a mobility-related issue (and I think balance would probably be considered mobility-related), he'll most likely be offered the option to use a mobility device wherever possible, even if that's not something he would normally use at home.

If it's a non-mobility issue related to waiting in line, you might qualify for the DAS pass. You must explain what prevents you from being able to wait in a traditional line to the guest services cast member and they'll determine if you qualify. (It's against forum rules to give advice about "what to say" beyond that you need to explain your needs and how they prevent you from waiting in line.)

If it's a vision-related issue (needs to sit in a certain side of the auditorium so he can see, etc), I think those are handled at each attraction, and it's recommended that you speak with the "greeter" at each attraction to explain your needs.
 

Simba's Mom

<font color=green>everything went to "H*** in a ha
Joined
Aug 26, 1999
I have always wondered this, my husband, has had multiple strokes over the years. Results have been permeant vision loss in the left side of both eyes and the last one left him with some muscle control loss on his left side which is kind of a balance issue. What all qualifies as a disability with Disney? We've never really looked because he's a younger guy (or was in the past when we went) so he's always just toughed it out but now that we are older the thought of 6 days of walking around is a bit more daunting.
If you haven't, PLEASE encourage your DH to use a scooter. I've been in the "I'll tough it out", "I'm too young, "People will stare and/or make rude comments" camp, as many here have. Then the first time I rented a scooter, marveling about how much better I felt, I just waited for the first rude comment...and waited...and waited. You know what I found? Most people are extraordinarily helpful and patient with scooters.
 

redberyl

Mouseketeer
Joined
Apr 25, 2014
The current disability accomodations (DAS) dont decrease the amount of walking around at all. In my experience it actually increases the amount of walking. You have to go to the attraction or a guest umbrella to get a return time, then you have to walk around a bit to find someplace to wait, then you have to walk back to the ride and through the fastpass line. My daughter uses a wheelchair so shes happy being pushed around, but it ends up being a whole lot of extra walking for me with all the back and forth. If he wanted to use a wheelchair or scooter, most lines are accessible and no extra accomodations are needed, you just hop into line with your device.
 

cobright

DIS Veteran
Joined
Jan 6, 2013
If you haven't, PLEASE encourage your DH to use a scooter. I've been in the "I'll tough it out", "I'm too young, "People will stare and/or make rude comments" camp, as many here have. Then the first time I rented a scooter, marveling about how much better I felt, I just waited for the first rude comment...and waited...and waited. You know what I found? Most people are extraordinarily helpful and patient with scooters.

Disability accommodations are needs based, not diagnosis based. So there is no list of "what qualifies."
Also, be open to help that guest services can/may/might offer instead of or in addition to a DAS accommodation. On a few occasions my lady-friend and I have arrived at the park early only to discover that she was not going to remain awake for more than two or three hours. She's fought PC into remission but it's left her body very frail. She uses a power chair and we occasionally request additional accommodation when lines end up out in the sun (somewhere between half and all of the 35 pills she takes a day make her severely photo-sensitive)


edited by moderator to remove script
 
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jo-jo

DIS Veteran
Joined
Feb 28, 2011
If you haven't, PLEASE encourage your DH to use a scooter. I've been in the "I'll tough it out", "I'm too young, "People will stare and/or make rude comments" camp, as many here have. Then the first time I rented a scooter, marveling about how much better I felt, I just waited for the first rude comment...and waited...and waited. You know what I found? Most people are extraordinarily helpful and patient with scooters.

I wonder since OP mentions vision lost, if he could drive a scooter safely? Not sure if she means some or a lot of vision lost.

Perhaps something like a rollatar might be good. OP mentions some balance problems.
 
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eplcreel

Earning My Ears
Joined
Jul 10, 2021
It's basically a blindspot on his left, sees motion but no idea what it is. He typically has me walk on his right and keeps the wall on his left so as to not walk over anyone. He's been like this for 20 years so for the most part he can deal with the vision, but I do think the older he gets the more likely he's going to end up needing a some type of assistance. Appreciate all the responses.
 
  • mamabunny

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Oct 11, 2012
    It's basically a blindspot on his left, sees motion but no idea what it is. He typically has me walk on his right and keeps the wall on his left so as to not walk over anyone. He's been like this for 20 years so for the most part he can deal with the vision, but I do think the older he gets the more likely he's going to end up needing a some type of assistance. Appreciate all the responses.
    I came to suggest the same thing as my friend @jo-jo above; a Rollator might be a great compromise to try - after all, it gives something to hang on to while walking (for support) and it has a handy-dandy seat in case sitting is called for. I would just keep the phone number for a local mobility vendor in your phone, in case y'all decide to try an ECV; they could bring it out to you. Disney does rent wheelchairs & ECVs for in-Park use only; they can't be taken outside the Park, not even to the buses. Additionally, outside vendors tend to be cheaper (in the end) than Disney's daily rates.

    Remember that if you all decide to buy a Rollator (or borrow a mobility device of any kind from a friend, family member or community lending closet) that if you are flying, it will fly for free, and you can take it all the way to the aircraft door. We have to hub through DFW, and I would never make there without a mobility device; the concourses are too long, and the distance between gates too far. Contact your airline for more information on how they handle mobility devices.
     

    alizesmom

    Dreaming of Disney.
    Joined
    Jun 17, 2007
    I would hesitate to use a scooter. You have no control over those around him and it seems that people with perfect vision have problems with that.
    If you haven't, PLEASE encourage your DH to use a scooter. I've been in the "I'll tough it out", "I'm too young, "People will stare and/or make rude comments" camp, as many here have. Then the first time I rented a scooter, marveling about how much better I felt, I just waited for the first rude comment...and waited...and waited. You know what I found? Most people are extraordinarily helpful and patient with scooters.
    It's basically a blindspot on his left, sees motion but no idea what it is. He typically has me walk on his right and keeps the wall on his left so as to not walk over anyone. He's been like this for 20 years so for the most part he can deal with the vision, but I do think the older he gets the more likely he's going to end up needing a some type of assistance. Appreciate all the responses.
     

    clm10308

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jun 23, 2010
    Not a Disney accommodation, but has he ever had services from your state Department of Rehabilitation/Commission for Blind? He would probably qualify for some Orientation & Mobility training. Use of a white cane could help make up for some of the vision he has lost, and it (white cane) is an identifier that allows the public to be aware that he has a visual impairment.
     

    gap2368

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Feb 27, 2015
    I have always wondered this, my husband, has had multiple strokes over the years. Results have been permeant vision loss in the left side of both eyes and the last one left him with some muscle control loss on his left side which is kind of a balance issue. What all qualifies as a disability with Disney? We've never really looked because he's a younger guy (or was in the past when we went) so he's always just toughed it out but now that we are older the thought of 6 days of walking around is a bit more daunting.
    Sounds like your concerns Is that he will need a place to sit and can not walk that much if so a mobility device like a wheelchair would best suited his needs
     
  • Selket

    Been there - done that
    Joined
    Feb 28, 2000
    I have always wondered this, my husband, has had multiple strokes over the years. Results have been permeant vision loss in the left side of both eyes and the last one left him with some muscle control loss on his left side which is kind of a balance issue. What all qualifies as a disability with Disney? We've never really looked because he's a younger guy (or was in the past when we went) so he's always just toughed it out but now that we are older the thought of 6 days of walking around is a bit more daunting.
    A rental ECV could be great for him because it allows for a lot of independence to go and do what you want when you want...compared to a WC which needs someone to push you. He could also use it when he need to do so and park it for awhile and walk. Of course the big question is how much the blind spot affects his ability to operate it. He could always try it with a rented one day park scooter but those are not as easy to operate as the ones you rent from off-site. You could also call an off-site rental agency and ask if they'd refund part of your money if you rented for several days but wanted to return it. He might consider trying one out at a store like the grocery or Target where they usually have one available for shopping. Those are definitely more unwieldily but he could get a sense of how much the vision thing affects driving it and it would be free to try.

    I think no one can say but you guys whether he thinks it would be an issue and he may just have to try it first. He may be able and very used to compensating for the blind spot or it may just not be possible with his vision loss. I'm sort of less concerned about him bumping into someone than I would be for him driving off a curb. There are curbed areas (like Main Street) and lots of ramps to them for ECVs but you just have to pay attention and know where you are if you choose to drive up on the curb. Same goes for any sidewalks like at the resorts. You could also rent a regular wheelchair and he could push it to use for balance and could sit and ride (you'd have to push) for when he needs a break. It's a lot of work pushing a WC so some of that depends on you as well. A rollator is also a good choice but he'd have to walk everywhere.

    I've also found that the off-site rental ECV's will stop immediately when you let go of the tiller but the park rentals are not as responsive sometimes.
     

    piccolopat

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Apr 25, 2014
    With his vision problem, I'm not sure an ECV is best. Instead I would look into renting a wheelchair. When he's feeling up to it, he can push it and use it to stabilize his walking. When he's not feeling well, you can push him. I was in charge of pushing my son in law in a wheelchair when we went a couple of years ago. He's about 7" taller and at least 100 pounds heavier than me. I was also 61 at the time. Some of the inclines were challenging but I adjusted my position to compensate. I got the job because DD was pregnant and DH had a hernia. He was only 34 at the time but had a serious back injury. He was very reluctant to get a wheelchair but after the trip he said he was very glad he did.
     

    ttintagel

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Nov 28, 2011
    Not a Disney accommodation, but has he ever had services from your state Department of Rehabilitation/Commission for Blind? He would probably qualify for some Orientation & Mobility training. Use of a white cane could help make up for some of the vision he has lost, and it (white cane) is an identifier that allows the public to be aware that he has a visual impairment.
    This varies by state. In my state, you can’t get any kind of training or assistance until you’re legally blind.
     



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