Canadians Moving to the Magic

lulubell.f

Miss Laura Forster
Joined
Dec 1, 2017
Hey everyone! I'm a young Canadian and new(ish) Dis-er and was wondering if anyone here has experience with moving to Florida. If you have, can you share your story here? I'd love to hear about how you did it, your whole process of securing a job, finding a place to rent or buy, how you went about securing visas or green cards, where in Florida you ended up etc. if you'd care to share. I'll be married soon and making some serious concrete plans so I'd love to hear everyone's stories. Thanks friends :)
 

KathyM2

DIS Veteran
Joined
Jun 16, 2011
Following!! I love this idea!! I have no idea how you'd go about it though! You said you are young, so that's a good start. Have you thought about the Cultural representative program? Look that up, or if you are in university you may be able to get a job and visa through the college program...otherwise...marry an American!
 

TammyLynn33

DIS Veteran
Joined
Oct 8, 2008
Is your partner American ?
I married an American it lasted three years, (three years too long)
There is a lot of things you need to really think about
Health care the costs I had no idea really affects your cost of living and if only goes up every year as you age every year .
Cultural differences/acceptances
It honestly is a whole different world I didn’t understand . You don’t get it vacationing . I still love vacationing there.
just look at the whole picture and be cautious it’s a big decision with long lasting effects when you live in a different country ( tax implications citizenship costs issues, if you were to have a child there etc etc)
 
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  • scorpsfan

    Earning My Ears
    Joined
    Jan 14, 2017
    I have no experience on this topic but when I get to retirement age (or maybe earlier- who knows?!) I'd love to own a property down there and visit every winter for a few months. Perhaps rent it out when I wouldn't be there. Somewhere near Disney (of course!)
     

    lulubell.f

    Miss Laura Forster
    Joined
    Dec 1, 2017
    Well, my/our tentative plans are to get married to my boyfriend in the next couple of years and for him to get a TN visa by applying to jobs in Orlando. He works in computer systems so that's my easiest way as far as I can tell! My dream is to work for Dreams Unlimited Travel as an agent (I just graduated from a 2-year travel program with the goal fo working there so I'm very excited to see the applications open! Our visa would be for 3 years so we'll have time to decide if Orlando's a good fit or if we wanna do something else.
     

    dish rag

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jan 30, 2017
    Well, my/our tentative plans are to get married to my boyfriend in the next couple of years and for him to get a TN visa by applying to jobs in Orlando. He works in computer systems so that's my easiest way as far as I can tell! My dream is to work for Dreams Unlimited Travel as an agent (I just graduated from a 2-year travel program with the goal fo working there so I'm very excited to see the applications open! Our visa would be for 3 years so we'll have time to decide if Orlando's a good fit or if we wanna do something else.
    There is a HUGE difference in living in Orlando as compared to Ontario. The way business is conducted has differences. It's not impossible to get used to the other, but you need to know there are profound differences. Working in your field and in Orlando, knowing Spanish would be a big plus, if not expected.
     
  • ccudmore

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Apr 9, 2009
    Well, my/our tentative plans are to get married to my boyfriend in the next couple of years and for him to get a TN visa by applying to jobs in Orlando. He works in computer systems so that's my easiest way as far as I can tell! My dream is to work for Dreams Unlimited Travel as an agent (I just graduated from a 2-year travel program with the goal fo working there so I'm very excited to see the applications open! Our visa would be for 3 years so we'll have time to decide if Orlando's a good fit or if we wanna do something else.
    If one family member is working in the US on a TN visa, the other members of the family are NOT permitted to work unless they receive their own work visa. You would only be able to study, but not work. You would be eligible for a TD visa which does not permit you to work.
    Sorry for the bad news. I'd suggest you talk to a lawyer with experience in US immigration law before you go much further in your plans.

     

    ccudmore

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Apr 9, 2009
    If one family member is working in the US on a TN visa, the other members of the family are NOT permitted to work unless they receive their own work visa. You would only be able to study, but not work. You would be eligible for a TD visa which does not permit you to work.
    Sorry for the bad news. I'd suggest you talk to a lawyer with experience in US immigration law before you go much further in your plans.

    Another option to possibly look at is the J1 Visa which is the "Exchange Visitor Visa", also sometimes called the "Working Vacation Visa". This allows people under the age of 35 to work part-time for up to a year in specific fields. This visa cannot be extended past the 1 year and you have to return to Canada for a minimum of 2 years before re-applying for any other type of visa.
     
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    dish rag

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jan 30, 2017
    Yes I agree. You would be best to use an immigration lawyer. That’s what I did. Then I got travel insurance once I dropped my US insurance. I had to return to Canada every 30 days during that time. There is a lot to it. The big thing you need to know is that working in Orlando isn’t as ideal as it seems. I was mostly in Florida at that time. Now mostly in Canada. My wife who has a Canadian passport and no status in the US is there now and a lot. There are things that go along with that too.
     

    lulubell.f

    Miss Laura Forster
    Joined
    Dec 1, 2017
    I mean like I said, I'm still trying to figure out the best plan. I knew that I couldn't work for an American company, being an at-home travel agent means I can work wherever I want and get revenue from companies regardless of where I locate myself. I was really just hoping to hear other people's stories and get to know some fellow Canadian Dis-ers :)
     
  • ottawamom

    The "Air Miles" Lady
    Joined
    Mar 9, 2005
    I know this isn't what you were asking for but like others have said vacationing and living in a place are two very different things. My DS wanted to move out west so he could live and ski. Not much of a planner I suggested that maybe for the time being he should stay put build his career and just vacation in the mountains a few times a year.

    I would strongly suggest you rethink your plans. Maybe work out a way to be able to vacation there a little more often. Canada is truly a great place to live for sooo many reasons. Perhaps you could still work for Dreams Unlimited as a Canadian agent serving Canadian clients that way you get to keep the Disney fun and excitement in your day to day. Being a travel agent would mean the need for frequent travel to your area of specialty so that you can best serve your clients.
     

    ccudmore

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Apr 9, 2009
    I knew that I couldn't work for an American company, being an at-home travel agent means I can work wherever I want and get revenue from companies regardless of where I locate myself.
    I'm not a lawyer so I don't want to give you legal advice. But I believe your only option would be to tele-work for a Canadian company. An immigration lawyer can give you more details.

    As for the "dream" of living and working in Orlando, I suggest you read the LaborLand series in the Orlando Sentinel that looks at what it's like to work in the hospitality industry in Orlando.
     

    Starwind

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    May 7, 2014
    I mean like I said, I'm still trying to figure out the best plan. I knew that I couldn't work for an American company, being an at-home travel agent means I can work wherever I want and get revenue from companies regardless of where I locate myself. I was really just hoping to hear other people's stories and get to know some fellow Canadian Dis-ers :)
    It isn't as simple as that. There are both immigration and taxation implications, from both countries involved. You need to seek competent legal advice about what you are planning so you understand all of your lawful options [and what isn't lawful] and their consequences.

    Also, I agree with what others have said, visiting the US and living in the US are two entirely different worlds. I immigrated to the US as the spouse of a US citizen over 20 years ago. Green card, naturalized, etc. I now live in Canada again. Moving to the US was a significant change, culture shock, etc. It took years to really get used to living there -- though I'm not sure even then I fully had, some things just never "made sense" even if you adapted to them because "they were" and you had to. Moving back to Canada had its own set of adaptations because I'd gotten used to how things worked in the US. And there are things I miss about living in the US that I wish we had here [more variety in stores, 24 hour grocery stores, stores open till midnight, Target...]. At the end of the day, while we share many commonalities between our countries, we are also culturally distinct and there are some drastic differences in how some aspects of life work, some of which have significant impacts on your life, daily or otherwise. Some of the differences one might notice when visiting the other country, but so many of them you do not see/experience until you are living there permanently or for a very extended period [i.e. no longer in the "vacation"/"temporary" mindset/experience]. Being engaged and them married to an American I had glimpses of some of it, but there was so much more I was unprepared for and had no idea about.

    SW
     

    dish rag

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jan 30, 2017
    It isn't as simple as that. There are both immigration and taxation implications, from both countries involved. You need to seek competent legal advice about what you are planning so you understand all of your lawful options [and what isn't lawful] and their consequences.

    Also, I agree with what others have said, visiting the US and living in the US are two entirely different worlds. I immigrated to the US as the spouse of a US citizen over 20 years ago. Green card, naturalized, etc. I now live in Canada again. Moving to the US was a significant change, culture shock, etc. It took years to really get used to living there -- though I'm not sure even then I fully had, some things just never "made sense" even if you adapted to them because "they were" and you had to. Moving back to Canada had its own set of adaptations because I'd gotten used to how things worked in the US. And there are things I miss about living in the US that I wish we had here [more variety in stores, 24 hour grocery stores, stores open till midnight, Target...]. At the end of the day, while we share many commonalities between our countries, we are also culturally distinct and there are some drastic differences in how some aspects of life work, some of which have significant impacts on your life, daily or otherwise. Some of the differences one might notice when visiting the other country, but so many of them you do not see/experience until you are living there permanently or for a very extended period [i.e. no longer in the "vacation"/"temporary" mindset/experience]. Being engaged and them married to an American I had glimpses of some of it, but there was so much more I was unprepared for and had no idea about.

    SW
    This is a very good post. I have found the differences living in Canada to be many. It’s very surprising. You mention the stores. There are many others. From small things like how the garbage is handled, the banking, how business is conducted, the general mind set. I find things move at a very very slow pace as compared to Florida. There is a much more so socialist mind set here, things are very complicated and lots of red tape. It’s very hard to explain to people, I try when I’m asked. But even then it’s hard to explain and very hard for them to understand. But the differences are profound. I find the Canadian people to be very kind and accommodating. And a little too trusting as to the ways of the world. Not much questioning but more of going along with things. Canada is a great country and a nice place that live.
     

    TammyLynn33

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Oct 8, 2008
    yes! You really don’t appreciate just how wonderful it is to be Canadian until
    You live elsewhere . I loved Canada before but I had no idea how much until I left and the us wasn’t what I had experienced while vacationing there.
    The other point I can’t stress enough is I actually vacation more now. I thought bigger city more sporting events, concerts etc.. well there was a lot less disposable income after bills and health insurance policies. ( all the deals you see advertised on USA tv for health insurance won’t apply to you because you are not a citizen .)
    Again please don’t think we are all trying to burst your bubble but there’s just so many huge consequences no one ever thinks of



    It isn't as simple as that. There are both immigration and taxation implications, from both countries involved. You need to seek competent legal advice about what you are planning so you understand all of your lawful options [and what isn't lawful] and their consequences.

    Also, I agree with what others have said, visiting the US and living in the US are two entirely different worlds. I immigrated to the US as the spouse of a US citizen over 20 years ago. Green card, naturalized, etc. I now live in Canada again. Moving to the US was a significant change, culture shock, etc. It took years to really get used to living there -- though I'm not sure even then I fully had, some things just never "made sense" even if you adapted to them because "they were" and you had to. Moving back to Canada had its own set of adaptations because I'd gotten used to how things worked in the US. And there are things I miss about living in the US that I wish we had here [more variety in stores, 24 hour grocery stores, stores open till midnight, Target...]. At the end of the day, while we share many commonalities between our countries, we are also culturally distinct and there are some drastic differences in how some aspects of life work, some of which have significant impacts on your life, daily or otherwise. Some of the differences one might notice when visiting the other country, but so many of them you do not see/experience until you are living there permanently or for a very extended period [i.e. no longer in the "vacation"/"temporary" mindset/experience]. Being engaged and them married to an American I had glimpses of some of it, but there was so much more I was unprepared for and had no idea about.

    SW
     

    Starwind

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    May 7, 2014
    This is a very good post. I have found the differences living in Canada to be many. It’s very surprising. You mention the stores. There are many others. From small things like how the garbage is handled, the banking, how business is conducted, the general mind set. I find things move at a very very slow pace as compared to Florida. There is a much more so socialist mind set here, things are very complicated and lots of red tape. It’s very hard to explain to people, I try when I’m asked. But even then it’s hard to explain and very hard for them to understand. But the differences are profound. I find the Canadian people to be very kind and accommodating. And a little too trusting as to the ways of the world. Not much questioning but more of going along with things. Canada is a great country and a nice place that live.
    Yes, the differences are pervasive through just about all aspects of life. From little things that may not mean you have to change much or at all, to really big things that mean you have to fundamentally change how you operate. Differences in laws and regulations, differences in mindsets. Differences in education and the implications that has for people's knowledge and awareness. Difference in awareness of local / regional / national / international events, and the importance and "how much one cares" placed on same. Then throw in different political systems, etc.

    And I agree that some of it is easy to explain and some if it is really hard to articulate, even though having experienced it you see/understand it -- putting it into words can be a whole other issue though.
     

    dish rag

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jan 30, 2017
    Yes, the differences are pervasive through just about all aspects of life. From little things that may not mean you have to change much or at all, to really big things that mean you have to fundamentally change how you operate. Differences in laws and regulations, differences in mindsets. Differences in education and the implications that has for people's knowledge and awareness. Difference in awareness of local / regional / national / international events, and the importance and "how much one cares" placed on same. Then throw in different political systems, etc.

    And I agree that some of it is easy to explain and some if it is really hard to articulate, even though having experienced it you see/understand it -- putting it into words can be a whole other issue though.
    Thank you for your last paragraph. Well said. It is hard to articulate. My dad did lots of business in Hamilton in the 70’s and 80’s. Lots if it classified work. I’m not sure many there knew it was going on. Dad flew up there and back several times a week. He told me it was going to be very different. He said that we look the same, talk the same, but we aren’t the same. He’s right. None of it bad, or good, just different. I can’t get used to many things. The metric system for one, many many other things. But I e learned to deal with them. It’s even hard not having a garbage disposal as silly as that sounds. Love getting back to Orlando for that! My Canadian wife is there now. She comes back to the “ice box” tomorrow. Again, I love the Canadian people. I do get lots of questions and enjoy the dialogue.
     

    cdnSpinalTap

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    Aug 9, 2007
    Hey everyone! I'm a young Canadian and new(ish) Dis-er and was wondering if anyone here has experience with moving to Florida. If you have, can you share your story here? I'd love to hear about how you did it, your whole process of securing a job, finding a place to rent or buy, how you went about securing visas or green cards, where in Florida you ended up etc. if you'd care to share. I'll be married soon and making some serious concrete plans so I'd love to hear everyone's stories. Thanks friends :)
    I say go wherever you heart and desires take you! Yes there are differences, but you are young and you have plenty of time to do and experience different things.

    The one thing you have to take from everyone's posts, is just to make sure you do the proper research and legal due diligence. But other than that, good for you for being adventurous and looking at new and exciting opportunities. What you are looking to do is difficult, yes...impossible, no. Anything worth doing or trying is usually that way.
     

    dish rag

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jan 30, 2017
    I say go wherever you heart and desires take you! Yes there are differences, but you are young and you have plenty of time to do and experience different things.

    The one thing you have to take from everyone's posts, is just to make sure you do the proper research and legal due diligence. But other than that, good for you for being adventurous and looking at new and exciting opportunities. What you are looking to do is difficult, yes...impossible, no. Anything worth doing or trying is usually that way.
    I agree 100%. You only get one life. I’ve always lived a more adventurous life than most people. Living in two countries gives one a different way of looking at things. it changes a person. My own cousin moved to Mexico 35 years ago to have her children there. I still see her 3 or 4 times a year. She text often. Her children tried to move to the US as young adults. But really they are Mexicans first, and although fluent in English with an American accent, they can’t read or write in English, good enough to work, so they went back and are happy there.
     

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