This Trip Report Is Under Refurbishment For Your Future Enjoyment (UPDATED 9/13 with final bonus chapter)

pkondz

. . Dis Dad #797 . . Hoping to get lucky
Joined
Mar 9, 2007
I can't take credit for that one. It's a Homer Simpson quote.
Disbelief withdrawn.
Ooh. Sharpening the knives early, I see.
Is there a better time? I think not.
I usually try and distract the breakfast attendants.
With dad jokes, right?
I hate it when places make a change that didn't need to be made. The former rolls were terrific.
:sad2:
Thank goodness. Not a fan of snobs.
Nope. Who is? I mean... other than other snobs.
I got some video on my phone, but was too lazy to upload it.
I don't even know how to.
Yes! Down in front! Get those dumb kids out of the way!
:laughing:
😆 Totally worth it.
:lmao:
I can see that! The cypress trees are like big bonsai trees, the way the ocean winds have twisted them.
Also the lack of flowers and landscaping.
Don't they know who I am???

Probably not.
Nah. They know.
Yep. They narrow the fairways. The rough is incredibly thick and high--if you hit it in there, chances are you can't reach the green--you just have to chip it back into the fairway. Then the greens are hard and fast, so it's tough to stop the ball near the hole. There have been many years where not a single golfer finished under par, including the winner.
Huh! Really! That's pretty uncommon, isn't it?
I felt the same way. Maybe I could justify the greens fee...just once...but doubling the price with a hotel stay feels like gouging. I dunno. Maybe if I win the lottery or something.
Yeah... Adding in that hotel is just... nope.
Yes. Yay. Woohoo.
:lmao:
 

jedijill

Chiefs fan living in Bronco country
Joined
Jan 17, 2005
Hi Mark I don't comment alot but I do read along but I had to comment on this.
When I read Welcome to the Rock my first thought was the song from the Broadway Show - Come From Away. That is one of the songs welcoming people to Newfoundland and I thought wow they travelled far in a day.
Thank you! I am singing that in my head too! Thought I was just crazy.! LOL
 

jedijill

Chiefs fan living in Bronco country
Joined
Jan 17, 2005
Caught back up!

Looks like you had a great time in SF and i can't believe you found all day parking for $20! The 17 mile drive road is gorgeous! It's worth the $10.50. :)

Jill in CO
 
  • Captain_Oblivious

    DIS Dad #257
    Joined
    Nov 10, 2008
    Great update! Such beautiful pictures. I'm not really a fan of golf but we did the 17 Mile Dr. several years ago. Loved the scenery and it was fun to see the famous courses. We had lunch there and checked out the gift shop. Interested to hear what your next stop is!
    I'm really glad we did the drive. Surprisingly, my wife was too! That was a relief.

    That's because you couldn't. Your family ate them all at breakfast in one sitting.
    I mean, I can't deny this.

    This really galls me. Certain things should be free in life: water, parking and a Sunday drive (other than gas).
    Yeah, I found it annoying too.

    It's a gorgeous piece of coastline.

    Oh nice one!
    Thanks!

    I'd sit there a spell golf course or not. Just perfect.
    I really wished I could play. Had to settle for daydreaming.

    Good Lord! How incredibly beautiful!
    I can see why they chose this as their logo. So distinctive.

    :welcome:, Drew!! You're the youngest and most recent inductee to the ChunkyDump Club. Take a squat and make yourself comfy, Kiddo!
    That was Dave, but he's already a pro!

    I know absolutely nothing about golf and have very little interest in it so I admit that I skipped the green paragraphs. But I have to say that the pictures of the courses are gorgeous. No wonder they charge so much mone for guests to play.
    Well, that's why I made those sections green. I know there aren't too many people that are into golf.

    I'm sure they could do just fine charging a little less...

    I love reading about your bonus material! You guys plan great trips!
    Thanks! Sometimes they get a little crazy in terms of the amount of driving we do.
     

    franandaj

    I'm so happy, I could BOUNCE!
    Joined
    Nov 15, 2009
    I’m afraid I must be the bearer of bad news
    they have been replaced with a “new and improved” version in a partnership with Cinnabon that is definitely new but in no way improved and probably saves the hotel chain a few nickels.
    Oh no! I remember how much you guys really liked those Cinnamon Rolls!

    And now we’re a little less likely to stay there. If I get a good rate, sure, but I won’t be as quick to seek it out.
    I totally get that. I'm not sure I've ever stayed at one, cause if we're not at Dosney we tend to stay at Hilton chains. Hampton is pretty high up there on my list.

    The 17-Mile Drive is a scenic road that takes you around the entire Monterey Peninsula.
    I'm wondering if I've ever done this. Perhaps on that trip my parents took the family to Monterey and the only tape we had for the 8-track player was the album by the Moody Blues with "Nights in White Satin" on it. Made for an interesting vibe on the trip.

    Anyway, we held our noses and paid the fee because we (ok, the boys and I) wanted to see the golf courses.
    Fair enough.

    Now, I know that most of you are not avid golfers. I’ve probably already caused some of you to start nodding off just by mentioning the word “golf”.
    Was that aimed at me?

    They were also LOUD. Constant barking could be heard across the water. We got a big kick out of it, to be honest. I think this was the first time my kids had ever seen seals in the wild.
    Another interesting this about growing up in California. I've always known seals, and never thought anything of them and their loud barking.

    For her part, Julie remarked to me that she had just expected to be bored in the car and indulging me while I gawked at golf courses, but between the coast, the views, and the seals, she was actually really enjoying the drive.
    Well that's good. She should have some fun too.

    I wanted to know how some of those seals had managed to climb all the way to the top of the rock.
    Those suckers are nothing if not determined, and mean and ornery too!

    The bad news: it costs $550 to play a round of 18 holes. Oh, and if you want a guaranteed tee time, you have to stay at one of their hotels, where rooms start around $650 a night.
    :eek: To quote @pkondz, nope, nopity, nope, nope.

    Finally, after a morning spent in the company of the rich and famous, in the shadows of their castles, looking out over their playgrounds, we settled down into our minivan and ate our peanut-butter-and-jelly sandwiches.
    Well there you go. I hope you redeemed your $10.50 towards that ball cap.....
     

    Captain_Oblivious

    DIS Dad #257
    Joined
    Nov 10, 2008
    I did know, even before seeing Andy and pkondz replies.
    As a kid, I saw them play the Globetrotters many moons ago when they visited my hometown. It was a big deal at the time because well known entertainment (be it music or sports) rarely came this far north to smaller venues.
    Good work! I just loved the idea of walking around with a shirt proclaiming to be a fan. I love jokes hidden in plain sight like that.

    I do enjoy occasionally overpaying for Cinnabon, but those turds wrapped in Cinnabon paper do not bear resemblance.
    Not in the least. It's like the scraps from their factory.

    I do believe I have been there before.
    I don't know why we do that to ourselves. It's like Jim Gaffigan on Hot Pockets: "I've never met someone who ate one of those and said, 'I'm glad I ate that.'"

    I actually watched a little of that over the weekend.
    I'm a very casual golf fan, but I do enjoy watching on occasion.
    I tried playing years ago. It did not go well.
    It rarely does for any of us. I sure do enjoy it, though. Maybe I'm a masochist.

    She might be a keeper.
    ::yes::

    Climbing up is one thing. Getting down is another. I wonder how many take the risk and just roll themselves off.
    I'd love to see one take a flying leap into a bellyflop.

    Oh no!!!!! They got rid of the cinnamon rolls???? HI Express used to be one we'd go to frequently for that reason alone... now Hampton definitely moves up a notch in our "decent hotels that are pretty consistent and have good breakfast but don't necessarily break the bank" category.
    I knew it wasn't just me! The new ones are pretty lousy. I think you'd be disappointed too.

    Well, if you got to see more, they'd probably charge you more! I mean considering these people probably wipe with a 10...
    It's definitely a different world than the one we live in.

    And a whole box of balls... because they're all going to end up in the rocky cliffs or ocean. :rolleyes1
    But you'd never have so much fun losing so many!

    Most people only see scenes like this on TV...
    ::yes::

    Well, how about that? Maybe there won't be a divorce.
    That would be great, because I don't want to have to try and find another woman who would go out with me again.

    You should have brought a green jacket to wear there... then you could pose like you're halfway to a career grand slam.
    :rotfl2:I love that idea! Wish I'd thought of it.

    Commoners...
    You're just finding this out?
     

    Captain_Oblivious

    DIS Dad #257
    Joined
    Nov 10, 2008
    Is there a better time? I think not.
    I always did my knife sharpening in the evening. Better light.

    With dad jokes, right?
    That's pretty much my only weapon.

    Nope. Who is? I mean... other than other snobs.
    They seem to have a lot of fun judging the rest of us.

    I don't even know how to.
    I think I would have to upload it to YouTube, and then embed the link here.

    Also the lack of flowers and landscaping.
    I suspect the course is heavily landscaped in order to make it look...like it wasn't landscaped.

    Nah. They know.
    That's what I was afraid of.

    Huh! Really! That's pretty uncommon, isn't it?
    Yes! In most tournaments, at least half the field is under par.

    Yeah... Adding in that hotel is just... nope.
    You could get several days at Disney for that price.

    Caught back up!

    Looks like you had a great time in SF and i can't believe you found all day parking for $20! The 17 mile drive road is gorgeous! It's worth the $10.50. :)
    It might have been $25, but it was still a pretty good deal. I think that was just on weekends.

    It was a great drive! I think it was worth the cost at least once.
     
  • Captain_Oblivious

    DIS Dad #257
    Joined
    Nov 10, 2008
    Oh no! I remember how much you guys really liked those Cinnamon Rolls!
    I can't believe they changed them. We just can't have nice things, I guess.

    I totally get that. I'm not sure I've ever stayed at one, cause if we're not at Dosney we tend to stay at Hilton chains. Hampton is pretty high up there on my list.
    Hampton is usually pretty good. I rarely have a complaint about them, other than they can be surprisingly pricey sometimes.

    I'm wondering if I've ever done this. Perhaps on that trip my parents took the family to Monterey and the only tape we had for the 8-track player was the album by the Moody Blues with "Nights in White Satin" on it. Made for an interesting vibe on the trip.
    Now there's a picture for you. I love the 8-track reference.

    Fair enough.
    I couldn't be near Pebble Beach and not go see it, ya know?

    Was that aimed at me?
    You and the vast majority of my readers.

    Another interesting this about growing up in California. I've always known seals, and never thought anything of them and their loud barking.
    I can imagine it would become white noise after a while. It was exotic to us.

    Well that's good. She should have some fun too.
    I guess.:p

    Those suckers are nothing if not determined, and mean and ornery too!
    I guess they really wanted to be on that rock, then!

    :eek: To quote @pkondz, nope, nopity, nope, nope.
    Who has that kind of money?

    Well there you go. I hope you redeemed your $10.50 towards that ball cap.....
    It was still better than shelling out $1200.
     

    Captain_Oblivious

    DIS Dad #257
    Joined
    Nov 10, 2008
    Bonus Chapter 5: All That's Missing Is The Windmill

    As I mentioned earlier, I'm pulling an Inception move (love that movie, btw) and inserting a bonus chapter within the bonus chapters here. This chapter has nothing to do with San Francisco or California or that trip that I'm still in the process of writing about. But I mentioned golf in the last chapter so this seems like an appropriate spot to drop in.

    And, as always, if you could not give a flying wooden nickel about golf, feel free to skip this one and move on to whenever I write the next California chapter. I won't judge you. Much.

    My father celebrated his 70th birthday a while back. For years, every time one of my kids had a birthday, he and Mom would give them a trip somewhere as a gift. Usually it was a day trip, but every once in a while they'd go on a longer one. So the birthday trip became a tradition in our family. When my father hit the big milestone, my brothers and I hit upon the idea that we could take him on his own trip. He's always loved the idea of taking his boys on a golf trip somewhere, but it's never quite worked out, what with our jobs and kids and commitments and budget committees hanging over our heads. So we offered him a trip to North Carolina to play a golf course that has always been on his Bucket List to try (and as it happened, mine too).

    Then one thing after another happened--my one brother started his own architecture firm in New Hampshire and was working hard to get that off the ground, and my other brother got laid off and then found a new job that forced him to move to Ohio while also finding out that his wife was expecting their third child.

    Basically, I could never nail them down on the calendar.

    So, out of a desire to actually deliver on the 70th birthday gift before my father turned 75, I ended up talking to everyone and then made arrangements to take my father, just the two of us, with my brothers' blessing. So they still owe him a gift, but you didn't hear that from me.

    Anyway, we drove down to the Pinehurst area of North Carolina. Pinehurst is fairly famous in the golfing world--it's the home of the Pinehurst resort, which boasts 9 golf courses of its own, not to mention the dozens surrounding the area. The Pinehurst No. 2 course is their most famous, having hosted the U.S. Open several times among other major championships. The area is full of rolling hills and sandy soils, which makes for prime ground for golf courses (similar to Scottish linksland).

    We were not traveling to play Pinehurst, because I still work on a government salary. But to tell the truth, the Pinehurst courses have always looked a little boring to me. Especially when you can compare them to Tobacco Road Golf Club in nearby Sanford, NC. That's where we were headed.

    In my last chapter, I mentioned the name of golf architect Mike Strantz. He renovated the Monterey Peninsula Country Club Shore Course to national acclaim as one of his final projects before succumbing to tongue cancer at the age of 50. I'd first heard of him when playing one of his courses in the Myrtle Beach, SC area. My father and I had both read of Tobacco Road in various golf magazines in articles--it had been hyped as one of the most unique golf courses ever built. It almost always appeared on various rankings of the "toughest golf courses in the country." We'd decided we needed to try it out, just once.

    Naturally, after driving all day in beautiful weather, we showed up for our tee time the following morning in a light, cool drizzle. Thankfully, it never rained hard on us (after storms overnight) and we were able to get our round in without an issue.

    The place is really beautiful. The course was built out of an old quarry 20 years ago. Strantz had been inspired by the land and got to work building one of the most unique, interesting golf courses I've ever seen.

    The clubhouse sits in a pine forest, giving off a laid-back vibe. There's no swimming pool, no giant restaurant, no tennis courts...nothing but a pro shop and a back porch where you can sit and have a beer and watch other groups finish. I liked that.



    When I paid for our round, the club pro informed me that they recommend first-time golfers buy a yardage guide to the course. This is a booklet that shows a detailed diagram of every hole, showing how far it is to various landmarks. We would discover later that the pro was not lying. So I picked one up. The quote on the back from the architect was not reassuring.



    We hit some warmup shots on the range, practiced putting on the green. Theoretically, warming up like this helps you score better during your actual round.

    Narrator: it didn't help.

    Tobacco Road is without question the hardest golf course I've ever played. There are blind shots (meaning you can't see your target), huge hills, giant bunkers, fast sloping greens...and that's all on the first hole. Actually, I mis-spoke. The ranger said there are no bunkers on the course. All of the sandy areas were instead to be played as "waste areas" under their own local rule--this meant that you could pick up your ball and improve your lie whenever you hit it in there. Normally, in golf you must play your ball as it lies. I suspect that this local rule was put into place because if you had to play some of these shots where they lay you'd never, ever get out of the bunker. We'd still be there.

    Tobacco Road is all about one's attitude. It's said that you can learn more about a person's character in one round of golf than in a lifetime of conversation, and I think there's a lot of truth to that. You can learn if someone is honest--do they count all of their shots? Call penalties on themselves? You can learn if they can handle adversity--do they throw tantrums? Whine and complain about bad breaks? Or do they buckle down and say, "Watch this shot!"

    My father and I decided that you absolutely cannot play this course without a sense of humor. Here is the view from the very first tee:





    We burst out laughing at that. That is easily one of the most intimidating first tee shots I've ever seen on a golf course. They're asking you to thread the needle between these two giant "mountains" (probably about 60-70 feet high with your driver, the least accurate club in the bag. If ever there was a shot that warned a golfer about what he is in for, it's this one.

    And yet, it's all about visual intimidation. These hills are only about 180 yards out. I average about 250-260 yards off the tee. So if I can just hit my normal shot, the fairway opens up much wider beyond:



    You just have to get out of your own way and hit the shot correctly.

    Narrator: He didn't.

    I actually did thread the needle, but I sliced it enough that my ball rolled into some thick rough beyond--the stuff in the right side of the above photo. It would be that kind of a day.

    And you know what? I didn't care in the least. My father and I have never had so much fun getting our butts kicked on the golf course.

    We just enjoyed the ride, attempting to hit across an ocean of sand on hole 4:



    Narrator: He didn't.

    Or looking at the crazy sloping green on number 7. Keep in mind that the camera flattens out slopes. My father hit his ball on the front of this green. He could barely see over the ridge to where the pin was, in the back. And he's 6'2" tall.



    We couldn't believe how far uphill number 9 was. For scale, reference the golf cart from the group ahead of us, on the right side of the photo.



    This was the par-5 11th hole, which required us to navigate around a gaping sand pit at least 30 feet deep. I attempted to carry the bunker in one heroic shot.



    Narrator: He got out his sand wedge for his next shot.

    I mean, look at this. This will either make you quit the game in a rage or burst out laughing. I couldn't stop giggling.



    It got even more ludicrous, if that's possible. The 13th hole is another par 5, playing around a couple of bends and uphill to a green that is...well, unlike any I've ever seen in my life. This was my approach shot (yes, from another bunker). Where do I hit this? Do you see the flag?



    Let's zoom in a bit. See it now? On the left?



    The green is hidden completely from view in a sunken pit. They actually had to put the flag on an extended 10-ft.-tall pole in order for us to (barely) be able to see it. You basically have to hit it and hope. But the cool thing is, if you hit it right, almost all of the slopes will feed the ball down to the green. You just have to hit it right.



    Narrator: He didn't.

    We'll call it the Pit of Despair.

    However, while we were struggling to find each ball after every shot, we couldn't help but notice how beautiful the course was. It almost looked like a Salvador Dali painting come to life, the way the slopes kind of all melted into each other.



    Anyway, you get the idea. We finished our round with the par-3 17th hole, across yet another ocean of sand to a tiny sliver of a green that looked like it was miles away.



    Again, that's visual intimidation. It's really only about 120 yards, or a pitching wedge for me. I actually hit the green on this one. It's one of the narrowest greens I've ever seen--about 4-5 feet wide at its narrowest point.



    Narrator: He missed the birdie putt, though.

    The 18th and final hole gives one last kick in the teeth. They make you hit your drive over this quarry wall of rock.



    My father and I laughed the whole day. I typically shoot somewhere in the 80's over 18 holes. Here, I barely broke 100. I've never had so much fun playing such bad golf. We talked about how much we'd like to try again, now that we had some idea of where the holes went and where to hit shots. Of course, that idea depends on us being able to make the ball go where we want it to.

    I guess that doesn't matter. The biggest indicator of how our day went was right there: we couldn't wait to try this again someday.
     

    pkondz

    . . Dis Dad #797 . . Hoping to get lucky
    Joined
    Mar 9, 2007
    I'm pulling an Inception move (love that movie, btw) and inserting a bonus chapter within the bonus chapters here.
    Good movie.
    When my father hit the big milestone, my brothers and I hit upon the idea that we could take him on his own trip.
    Very nice thought. :)
    So we offered him a trip to North Carolina to play a golf course that has always been on his Bucket List to try (and as it happened, mine too).
    Gee... Funny how that worked out.


    :rolleyes1

    ("No dad. This is the course you want to play. No... this one... This one...")
    So they still owe him a gift, but you didn't hear that from me.
    :laughing:
    Pinehurst is fairly famous in the golfing world
    Even I've heard of that one.
    We were not traveling to play Pinehurst, because I still work on a government salary.
    Gee, way to build it up and then dash the dreams, Mark.
    It almost always appeared on various rankings of the "toughest golf courses in the country." We'd decided we needed to try it out, just once.
    I'd be too intimidated to even attempt it.
    The course was built out of an old quarry 20 years ago.
    Really! I've never heard of that... Didn't think it'd be possible, to be honest. Huh!
    The clubhouse sits in a pine forest, giving off a laid-back vibe. There's no swimming pool, no giant restaurant, no tennis courts...nothing but a pro shop and a back porch where you can sit and have a beer and watch other groups finish. I liked that.
    I like that too. I (extremely) rarely have played, and doubt I could now, anyway. But... I think a golf club should be a golf club.
    I appreciate that they cut out the "suckahs!" part of the quote.
    We hit some warmup shots on the range, practiced putting on the green. Theoretically, warming up like this helps you score better during your actual round.
    Uh, huh.
    Narrator: it didn't help.
    Audience: It never does.
    All of the sandy areas were instead to be played as "waste areas" under their own local rule--this meant that you could pick up your ball and improve your lie whenever you hit it in there. Normally, in golf you must play your ball as it lies. I suspect that this local rule was put into place because if you had to play some of these shots where they lay you'd never, ever get out of the bunker. We'd still be there.
    :faint:
    Here is the view from the very first tee:

    What the he... heck is that??????
    I average about 250-260 yards off the tee.
    pffftttt… I can drive that easily in my car.
    You just have to get out of your own way and hit the shot correctly.

    Narrator: He didn't.
    :laughing:
    I'm not surprised. The course looks designed to be tough... and to get in your head.
    And you know what? I didn't care in the least. My father and I have never had so much fun getting our butts kicked on the golf course.
    :) Probably the only attitude you could have there.
    Uh.... someone forgot to iron the kinks out of the green.
    This was the par-5 11th hole, which required us to navigate around a gaping sand pit at least 30 feet deep.
    um.... nothing like golfing in the Sahara!
    I attempted to carry the bunker in one heroic shot.
    Wait... lemme guess...
    Narrator: He got out his sand wedge for his next shot.
    … yep. As I thought.
    :eek:

    Are you kidding me??????
    It got even more ludicrous, if that's possible.
    I don't see how!
    Where do I hit this? Do you see the flag?
    Nope.
    It almost looked like a Salvador Dali painting come to life,
    Yes! It does!
    Here, I barely broke 100.
    That'd be an amazing day for me.
    And frankly I'm surprised you did even that well... I don't care how good a golfer you are!
    I guess that doesn't matter. The biggest indicator of how our day went was right there: we couldn't wait to try this again someday.
    :)
    Glad you and your dad had such a great day.
     
  • rdkeim

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Oct 23, 2006
    Oh my - that course looks ridiculous. I'm not a golfer but it seems like it would take multiple rounds to even begin to master it. But, I'm glad you just enjoyed the experience and spending quality time with your dad!
     

    afwdwfan

    DIS Dad #460
    Joined
    Apr 23, 2010
    So we offered him a trip to North Carolina to play a golf course that has always been on his Bucket List to try (and as it happened, mine too).
    How convenient...
    Basically, I could never nail them down on the calendar.

    So, out of a desire to actually deliver on the 70th birthday gift before my father turned 75, I ended up talking to everyone and then made arrangements to take my father, just the two of us, with my brothers' blessing. So they still owe him a gift, but you didn't hear that from me.
    Man, that's too bad, but it does sound like they had some pretty legitimate excuses.
    Anyway, we drove down to the Pinehurst area of North Carolina. Pinehurst is fairly famous in the golfing world--it's the home of the Pinehurst resort, which boasts 9 golf courses of its own, not to mention the dozens surrounding the area. The Pinehurst No. 2 course is their most famous, having hosted the U.S. Open several times among other major championships. The area is full of rolling hills and sandy soils, which makes for prime ground for golf courses (similar to Scottish linksland).
    Oh! Cool! That will be a lot of fun to play!
    We were not traveling to play Pinehurst, because I still work on a government salary. But to tell the truth, the Pinehurst courses have always looked a little boring to me. Especially when you can compare them to Tobacco Road Golf Club in nearby Sanford, NC. That's where we were headed.
    Classic misdirection. Well played!
    When I paid for our round, the club pro informed me that they recommend first-time golfers buy a yardage guide to the course. This is a booklet that shows a detailed diagram of every hole, showing how far it is to various landmarks. We would discover later that the pro was not lying. So I picked one up. The quote on the back from the architect was not reassuring.
    He could tell just by looking at you...
    Ok... I've never seen a picture of this guy before. For someone who designed some world class golf courses, he sure doesn't look like somebody they'd even let into the clubhouse at most world class golf courses! :rotfl:
    We hit some warmup shots on the range, practiced putting on the green. Theoretically, warming up like this helps you score better during your actual round.

    Narrator: it didn't help.
    Here's my theory...
    In a day on the golf course, I'm capable of, at best, maybe 12 really good shots. Why take a chance of wasting one of those on practice?
    You can learn if someone is honest--do they count all of their shots?
    Well, yes. At least I try. Sometimes I run out of fingers so I just pick it up and call it a 10.
    Call penalties on themselves?
    Yes. At least the ones I know. I can't say that I know the rule book front to back. There are a lot of rules. But I do know 1 stroke in the water, 1 out. That one I have down. What's the penalty for losing a ball? I usually drop one in the general vicinity and add a stroke... Again, I'm not playing for money or trophies here... :lmao:
    You can learn if they can handle adversity--do they throw tantrums? Whine and complain about bad breaks?
    Eh... I've taken off down a hill chasing a poorly hit ball and wound up bloody. I might say a curse word. Or 5. Slam the club into the ground. I haven't wrapped any around a tree or tested their buoyancy. Yet.
    Or do they buckle down and say, "Watch this shot!"
    :lmao::rotfl::rotfl2: Yeah Right. Maybe, hey, watch me choke on this easy 3 foot putt!
    And yet, it's all about visual intimidation. These hills are only about 180 yards out. I average about 250-260 yards off the tee. So if I can just hit my normal shot, the fairway opens up much wider beyond:
    To compensate for my slice, I'd probably have to broadside that left side hill.
    I mean, look at this. This will either make you quit the game in a rage or burst out laughing. I couldn't stop giggling.
    Where's the beer cart? We're gonna be here a while!
    You basically have to hit it and hope. But the cool thing is, if you hit it right, almost all of the slopes will feed the ball down to the green. You just have to hit it right.
    As if!
    My father and I laughed the whole day. I typically shoot somewhere in the 80's over 18 holes. Here, I barely broke 100. I've never had so much fun playing such bad golf. We talked about how much we'd like to try again, now that we had some idea of where the holes went and where to hit shots. Of course, that idea depends on us being able to make the ball go where we want it to.
    That's awesome! Really looks like a lot of fun. Just make sure you bring enough golf balls...
     

    franandaj

    I'm so happy, I could BOUNCE!
    Joined
    Nov 15, 2009
    So even though I understand zero golfspeak, I plundered through this chapter anyways.

    Nice that you got to something for your father, and even nicer that it was something that you wanted to do as well.

    From my limited understanding, I gather that all those sandy areas make it hard to play which is why they call them sand traps. Since my knowledge of golf pretty much comes from the movie Caddyshack, none of those shots looked anything like the hole where Rodney Dangerfield started rockin' out to Journey.

    I'm glad that you and your Dad were able to have a fun day of golf together and laugh at yourselves.
     

    docsoliday1

    DIS Dad #834 Cubs, Dolphins fan forever
    Joined
    Mar 12, 2008
    Yep. They narrow the fairways. The rough is incredibly thick and high--if you hit it in there, chances are you can't reach the green--you just have to chip it back into the fairway. Then the greens are hard and fast, so it's tough to stop the ball near the hole. There have been many years where not a single golfer finished under par, including the winner.
    I'm not a golfer, so forgive me if this is an obvious (as opposed to Oblivious) question...

    Doesn't par mean the normal for the hole? In other words if the normal for hole is 5, it's a par 5, right? So, if no golfer finishes under par, doesn't that mean the par should be adjusted up?
     

    Captain_Oblivious

    DIS Dad #257
    Joined
    Nov 10, 2008
    Your photos from this area were beautiful!

    The course in NC you took your dad to looked really nice as well! What an awesome gift!
    Thanks! Even if you don't like golf, we can at least appreciate the scenery.

    Good movie.
    I loved how original it was. Don't get too many non-franchise blockbusters these days.

    Very nice thought. :)
    I almost always take him golfing for Father's Day. That's really all he wants at this point.

    Gee... Funny how that worked out.


    :rolleyes1

    ("No dad. This is the course you want to play. No... this one... This one...")
    :rotfl2: If we both really want to go, it turns into an easy sell.

    Even I've heard of that one.
    :eek:

    Gee, way to build it up and then dash the dreams, Mark.
    That's what I do. It's a gift.

    I'd be too intimidated to even attempt it.
    Part of the trick of enjoying golf is to play from the correct tees. But even so, I'm sure this course is brutal from the beginner tees too.

    Really! I've never heard of that... Didn't think it'd be possible, to be honest. Huh!
    According to the website, the land was used for mining and sand excavation.

    I like that too. I (extremely) rarely have played, and doubt I could now, anyway. But... I think a golf club should be a golf club.
    I agree. I don't have any evidence to support this, but I feel like the golf experience is better if the club isn't trying to be all things to all people. Focus on the golf, and do it well.

    I appreciate that they cut out the "suckahs!" part of the quote.
    :rotfl2:The guy just looks the part of a rebel. His courses certainly don't look like anyone else's.

    Audience: It never does.
    This is true.

    What the he... heck is that??????
    Intimidation!

    pffftttt… I can drive that easily in my car.
    Well, that would be cheating. And it would tear up the grass.

    :laughing:
    I'm not surprised. The course looks designed to be tough... and to get in your head.
    Yep. Another architect, Pete Dye, is famous for a similar style of visual intimidation. He's the guy who built the island-green par 3 at the TPC Sawgrass in Florida.

    :) Probably the only attitude you could have there.
    It's such a frustrating game. Best to know your limitations. The thrill comes from when you face a difficult shot and actually pull it off. It's rare, but it's fun when it happens.

    Uh.... someone forgot to iron the kinks out of the green.
    Every green was nuts like that.

    um.... nothing like golfing in the Sahara!
    I feel like I was walking through a lot more sand than grass that day.

    Wait... lemme guess...
    … yep. As I thought.
    Yep.

    :eek:

    Are you kidding me??????
    We laugh so we don't cry.

    I don't see how!
    Well, when you can't even locate the green...

    That'd be an amazing day for me.
    And frankly I'm surprised you did even that well... I don't care how good a golfer you are!
    The disappointing thing was that I didn't play my best. I hit a lot of bad shots that had nothing to do with the course--just bad swings. Which is partly why I want to go try again.

    :)
    Glad you and your dad had such a great day.
    Thanks! I'm glad we pulled it off.
     

    Captain_Oblivious

    DIS Dad #257
    Joined
    Nov 10, 2008
    Oh my - that course looks ridiculous. I'm not a golfer but it seems like it would take multiple rounds to even begin to master it. But, I'm glad you just enjoyed the experience and spending quality time with your dad!
    Thanks! The best compliment I can give is that we couldn't wait to try it all over again.

    How convenient...
    Hey, he has good taste. What can I say?

    Man, that's too bad, but it does sound like they had some pretty legitimate excuses.
    Yeah. One lives in NH, the other in Ohio. It's hard to get everyone together.

    Oh! Cool! That will be a lot of fun to play!
    :rolleyes1

    Classic misdirection. Well played!
    :rolleyes1

    He could tell just by looking at you...
    Probably. I don't inspire confidence.

    Ok... I've never seen a picture of this guy before. For someone who designed some world class golf courses, he sure doesn't look like somebody they'd even let into the clubhouse at most world class golf courses! :rotfl:
    I know, right! I actually love that about the guy. He wasn't afraid to do things a little differently. Golf can be a snooty game, so I'm grateful for those willing to burst the bubble.

    Here's my theory...
    In a day on the golf course, I'm capable of, at best, maybe 12 really good shots. Why take a chance of wasting one of those on practice?
    That's a great point. My first few swings are usually terrible on any given day, so it makes sense to get those out of the way. After that, though, it's a total crapshoot.

    Well, yes. At least I try. Sometimes I run out of fingers so I just pick it up and call it a 10.
    I don't think anyone will complain about that.

    Yes. At least the ones I know. I can't say that I know the rule book front to back. There are a lot of rules. But I do know 1 stroke in the water, 1 out. That one I have down. What's the penalty for losing a ball? I usually drop one in the general vicinity and add a stroke... Again, I'm not playing for money or trophies here... :lmao:
    Close enough. I generally play by what I call "$50 rules". Meaning, if I pay $50 to play, I'm going to have fun. So if I hit one out of bounds, I'm not trudging all the way back to the tee to hit another. I'm just going to drop one, take a penalty and move on.

    Whereas if I'm playing in a tournament, I'll play by all the rules.

    Eh... I've taken off down a hill chasing a poorly hit ball and wound up bloody. I might say a curse word. Or 5. Slam the club into the ground. I haven't wrapped any around a tree or tested their buoyancy. Yet.
    I can't claim to always control my temper. I'm just saying your true self usually shows up on the golf course.

    :lmao::rotfl::rotfl2: Yeah Right. Maybe, hey, watch me choke on this easy 3 foot putt!
    I didn't say I'd pull it off! Just saying what the proper attitude should be.

    To compensate for my slice, I'd probably have to broadside that left side hill.
    Well, I think I'd like to see that. I bet you wouldn't be the first.

    Where's the beer cart? We're gonna be here a while!
    ::yes:: I bet most of the people who have played this course have asked that same question.

    Yeah...it's a nice idea in theory.

    That's awesome! Really looks like a lot of fun. Just make sure you bring enough golf balls...
    Pretty much. I think I need another shot at this one. Or 100.
     

    Captain_Oblivious

    DIS Dad #257
    Joined
    Nov 10, 2008
    So even though I understand zero golfspeak, I plundered through this chapter anyways.
    Wow, that's above and beyond the call of duty! I even gave you an out.

    Nice that you got to something for your father, and even nicer that it was something that you wanted to do as well.
    Thanks! I'm glad we finally got to go. It took forever to set up.

    From my limited understanding, I gather that all those sandy areas make it hard to play which is why they call them sand traps. Since my knowledge of golf pretty much comes from the movie Caddyshack, none of those shots looked anything like the hole where Rodney Dangerfield started rockin' out to Journey.
    You are correct! You don't want to hit it in the sand. Which I did. A lot.

    Then you know the most important tip for the golf swing: Be the ball.

    I'm glad that you and your Dad were able to have a fun day of golf together and laugh at yourselves.
    Thanks! It was a great time.

    I'm not a golfer, so forgive me if this is an obvious (as opposed to Oblivious) question...

    Doesn't par mean the normal for the hole? In other words if the normal for hole is 5, it's a par 5, right? So, if no golfer finishes under par, doesn't that mean the par should be adjusted up?
    So yes, par is the score one would be expected to shoot on a particular hole. But no, par does not get adjusted. In the U.S. Open, the conditions are made difficult. However, if a golfer executes the proper shots, he can still walk away with a par for the hole. It's just that it's virtually impossible to hit perfect shots for the entire round. So when a golfer hits it offline, the chances for recovering are much worse in a U.S. Open than they would be on a normal day. It can still be done, it's just that it's harder. The penalty for missing the fairways and greens is more severe.

    But that doesn't change the fact that if it's a par 4, a golfer should be able to get the ball in the hole in 4 shots.
     

    pkondz

    . . Dis Dad #797 . . Hoping to get lucky
    Joined
    Mar 9, 2007
    I loved how original it was. Don't get too many non-franchise blockbusters these days.
    I am getting pretty tired of remakes and super-hero movies, to be honest.
    I almost always take him golfing for Father's Day. That's really all he wants at this point.
    Time. Of course. :)
    :rotfl2: If we both really want to go, it turns into an easy sell.
    :laughing: I guess so!
    That's what I do. It's a gift.
    "gift"... interesting choice of words.
    Part of the trick of enjoying golf is to play from the correct tees. But even so, I'm sure this course is brutal from the beginner tees too.
    There's beginner tees there?????
    :rotfl2:The guy just looks the part of a rebel. His courses certainly don't look like anyone else's.
    No kidding! :faint:
    Intimidation!
    Successful at it too!
    Well, that would be cheating. And it would tear up the grass.
    Always a stickler for the rules...
    Yep. Another architect, Pete Dye, is famous for a similar style of visual intimidation. He's the guy who built the island-green par 3 at the TPC Sawgrass in Florida.
    I know that hole.
    I forgot which course it was on, but...
    It's such a frustrating game. Best to know your limitations. The thrill comes from when you face a difficult shot and actually pull it off. It's rare, but it's fun when it happens.
    I get that. ::yes::
    Every green was nuts like that.
    :faint:
    The disappointing thing was that I didn't play my best. I hit a lot of bad shots that had nothing to do with the course--just bad swings. Which is partly why I want to go try again.
    Huh. Then, yeah. You have to go back.
     

    Steppesister

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Dec 27, 2013
    Being as far behind as I am right now doesn't afford me much time to multi-quote. But, I can say I am caught up here. :) I've never golfed other than putt-putt and am okay with that.
     



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