The Running Thread - 2021

FFigawi

DIS Veteran
Joined
Dec 28, 2009
It's a new week, how about a new Question of the Day…?

QOTD: What are some of the things you did when you started running that you have since learned not to do today?

As I went out for a run the other day, I was thinking about my shoes and how they are approaching their max mileage target. And it got me thinking about how I never tracked mileage on my shoes when I started running and I would wear them until they basically fell apart. I can only imagine how many miles some of those old shoes had on them. It made me think about other stuff I would do when I first started running but don’t do today.
ATTQOTD: the biggest learning I had when I first started running is that I needed to vary my pace, my run type, and my run duration. I thought running was just that - go out for a run. It wasn't long before I learned all about the excitement of intervals, hill repeats, and speedwork. Not only do those make training more productive, they also make it far less boring than 45-60 minutes at the same old pace around the same old loop.
 

Popo

Earning My Ears
Joined
Sep 3, 2008
In the beginning, all my training was about getting in the mileage. As I started training for the first Goofy Challenge in 2006, I found there were few training plans for the multi-race format.
I did find an ultramarathon training concept called time-on-feet training. The body knows two things, time and effort. Mileage being a product of how long and how fast one runs. My training runs are now based upon time.
 

Baloo in MI

DIS Veteran
Joined
Jan 28, 2015
ATTQOTD: The biggest things I have learned is that running is a privilege. It can be easily taken away by injury and life demands. Can’t say I have been totally successful, but I am trying to let go of concerns about my speed (really lack there of) and accomplishments. I like having goals, but I am just trying to remember to enjoy the process more and not just the outcome.
 

Grabnar

Earning My Ears
Joined
Oct 1, 2020
ATTQOTD:
  • Learned that I was running too fast! I'd been hitting about 1min/mi below race pace thinking that was enough to train aerobically. Now I'm trying to go roughly by HR and I'm down an additional 2min/mi to get in the correct zone.
  • Running with music or podcasts for every run. I've been trying to be more mindful and taking the 30-45 min for my maintenance runs without headphones and using the time to clear my head or plan my week has been enormously helpful, especially with how crazy the last year has been.
 

Jules76126

Practically Perfect in Every Way
Joined
Apr 3, 2006
1) Running every run at all out effort. I felt that if every run wasn't the same pace I was some how failing.
2) Learning to accept that not all days are great but the important thing is to get out there. Some days you feel like you can run forever and others every step is an effort, but the hard days matter more than the easy ones.
3) Consistency is key and that is does get easier over time. When I first started a mile felt like the longest trek of my life.
 

TheHamm

DIS Veteran
Joined
Jan 12, 2017
Thank you for a new QOTD!
Something I did when I started running that I no longer do:
(1) Wear cotton socks. Thanks to this thread I learned that there are better fabrics. I also found I prefer wearing them at Disney.
(2) worry that others know that I am going out for a run. I do not advertise I run (still feel there is baggage being labeled a fat, slow 'runner' I am not interested in dealing with) but I am also not limited to leaving my house under the cover of darkness or slinking out of work with a layer of clothing over a pair of shorts and (cotton) tee shirt. I'm fine walking out of the office in my long, tight compression shorts and a tank top and coworkers know if they schedule their meetings for the one hour the work track is open I may show up in sweaty gear with an extra baggy shirt tossed on top.
(3) Feel defeated every time I run because I cannot PR the run. Not only did I think it always had to be faster, but I did not consider that running hills or in different weather would impact pace. This absolutely made sense, but it did not cross my mind for many months. Now I understand that food, water, stress, and sleep are also large factors.
(4) Dread going out. My purpose was a bit different when I started, and adjusting my perspective improved this dramatically.

ETA (5) think the first mile is representative of the whole run. As I learned here, "the first mile is a liar."
 
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GreatLakes

DIS Veteran
Joined
Aug 6, 2015
It's a new week, how about a new Question of the Day…?

QOTD: What are some of the things you did when you started running that you have since learned not to do today?
  • Running in boxer shorts and cotton socks was not a good idea
  • I used the treadmill to get up to 3 miles before my first 5K and hated every minute of it. I should have started running outside. My first run outside felt life changing
  • Like most I spent years just running each run at the best pace I could.
  • That workouts are just as important as mileage.
  • I spent most of my time on my upper body in the gym because I thought leg workouts would hurt my running. I've since changed this opinion.
 
  • KSellers88

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Oct 22, 2015
    QOTD: What are some of the things you did when you started running that you have since learned not to do today?
    I am very similar to others...I ran every run like I needed to set a PR, wore completely wrong shoes and my nutrition/hydration was a joke. Unfortunately the nutrition/hydration can still be an issue at times, but I now have correct shoes and love a good easy run.
     

    Sleepless Knight

    Jedi Knight Seeking His Jedi Princess
    Joined
    May 15, 2008
    I am very similar to others...I ran every run like I needed to set a PR, wore completely wrong shoes and my nutrition/hydration was a joke. Unfortunately the nutrition/hydration can still be an issue at times, but I now have correct shoes and love a good easy run.
    I'm so glad you mentioned this. My in race fueling for half marathons was wrong for years. I had no idea that it was so wildly off until I was bonking during the long runs of Dopey training. @DopeyBadger helped me see the problem and this community helped me find in race fueling that actually provided fuel and also agreed with my periodically, but not always sensitive stomach.

    Likewise, I discovered that not skipping the short maintenance/easy runs helped me to enjoy running more and helped the long runs feel better.
     

    DopeyBadger

    Imagathoner
    Joined
    Oct 15, 2015
    QOTD: What are some of the things you did when you started running that you have since learned not to do today?
    favorite things.gif

    -Don't "PR the day"
    -Don't wear random running shoes you found at the outlet store
    -Don't wear basketball shorts for running
    -Don't sign up for/race a marathon having never run further than 3-5 miles with the race in 8 weeks
    -Don't just randomly make a training plan. Trust the author and follow the plan as best as possible.
    -Do wear band-aids on chest
    -Do use body glide on thighs and toes
    -Do drink something during the course of a run
    -Don't "bank time" in a race
     
  • Herding_Cats

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    Aug 3, 2017
    QOTD: What are some of the things you did when you started running that you have since learned not to do today?


    ATTQOTD:
    1.) Running too fast, trying to get to a faster pace; I hated EVERY SINGLE RUN, despite my time going down.
    2.) Assuming that my cute Nike running shoes would work for an actual training plan.....I went and got fitted and stopped having horrible achy legs after my "long" run.
    3.) Worry about other people's pace. When I started running I was trying to get to a point where I could "keep up" with a specific person (although I did the math on what they said a` race time was, and what they said their pace was and there MUST have been a typo because there was no way it was accurate.)

    -Don't wear basketball shorts for running

    -Don't "bank time" in a race
    Oh dear. Basketball shorts is all DH has. "Short shorts" are probably not going to fly, so what recommendation do you have for him in general? Some sort of bike short to go UNDER the basketball shorts?


    What does "bank time" mean?
     

    DopeyBadger

    Imagathoner
    Joined
    Oct 15, 2015
    Oh dear. Basketball shorts is all DH has. "Short shorts" are probably not going to fly, so what recommendation do you have for him in general? Some sort of bike short to go UNDER the basketball shorts?
    Plenty of men's running short options that aren't short shorts.


    You could go with medium or long length. The in-seam will tell you how short short it is. When my legs were thinner I preferred 3in inseam. These days the leg strength workouts have caused my legs to be a little wider and 3 in inseam doesn't work like it used to (my legs eat the fabric). So now I wear "short tights".


    They also make 2-in-1 shorts with the benefits of "short tight" but covered up by an attached running short.


    What does "bank time" mean?
    It's a mental state of mind when running a "positive split" in a race. Let's use an extreme example for illustrative purposes.

    The goal is to run a 10k in 60 minutes.

    Person A runs the first half in 30 min and the second half in 30 min. They completed the race in "even" splits because the first and second half were equal.
    Person B runs the first half in 40 min and the second half in 20 min. They completed the race in "negative" splits because the first half was slower than the second half.
    Person C run the first half in 20 min and the second half in 40 min. They completed the race in "positive" splits because the first half was faster than the second half.

    Person C is likely to set out in the race at what is likely a too fast of pace for them. But despite the pace being too fast, they feel good and continue on. At some point they're going to realize their pace was originally too quick. In a moment of "not clarity" they are going to assure themselves everything is ok, because they "banked time". The goal was 60 min and here they are having finished the first half in 20 min, banking an extra 10 min above and beyond the average 30 min per half needed.

    The problem is that the body's physiological response does not follow a linear relationship (both HRvPace and Lactate threshold come to mind as power relationships rather than linear). Running 10 seconds/mile too fast does not have an equally offsetting response to running 10 seconds/mile too slow. Such that if Person C runs the first half in 20 min, despite that second half being 40 min they're likely to be in a world of hurt. Additionally, I would argue that Person C's fitness by doing the first half in 20 min suggests their fitness is far better than a 60 min 10k. Such that their poor racing pace strategy led to a sub-optimal performance.

    This is meant as a simple example. There are extenuating circumstances where a 20 min first half and 40 min second half could make sense. Perhaps the first half is all downhill and the second half is all uphill. Or perhaps the first half has a massive tailwind and the second half a massive headwind. But removing those other possibilites and just looking at say a flat two loop course, then you'd prefer to be either Person A (even) or Person B (negative) from a physiological standpoint. It's hard to be Person A (even) and hit maximal performance because you need really good data to determine where that pace should be. So in most cases, Person B (negative) is the strategy. It doesn't have to be an extreme example (like the 20 min + 40 min), but even something like 32 min and 28 min is a decent flat two loop 10k strategy. Far better than a "bank time"/positive split strategy.
     

    xjillianpaige

    adventure is out there
    Joined
    Jan 24, 2012
    It's a new week, how about a new Question of the Day…?

    QOTD: What are some of the things you did when you started running that you have since learned not to do today?
    Definitely starting out too fast. I ran track in high school and that was definitely my weakness as a freshman. I would go out speedy and then walk or just run really, really, really, REALLY slowly.

    I was also taught that it's hard to start running again once you start walking, and so you should do your best to keep running, no matter what. Since getting back into running in mid 2017, I had to unlearn that mind set. Intervals prove that you can, in fact, start running after a walk break. And that, heck! There is nothing wrong with that as a strategy for running/racing. Whoever gets you over the finish line.
     

    Bree

    Runs on Coffee
    Joined
    Jan 5, 2009
    Flat Florida runner with a question.

    I want to try and incorporate bridge repeats once a week, but really struggling with my web searches as HOW to do it. How long do I warm up? How many times up and down the bridge? What pace?

    I have a bridge that spans a four lane road on a nearby trail. I can access it from either 2.25ish or .50ish miles from a parking lot. I have no idea how long it is or the incline. I think it extends longer on one side due to elevation as well. I tried measuring it from a satellite photo and I'm getting anywhere from 136 feet to .18 miles.
     

    WhereInFlorida

    More Disney = A better day
    Joined
    Oct 30, 2012
    Flat Florida runner with a question.

    I want to try and incorporate bridge repeats once a week, but really struggling with my web searches as HOW to do it. How long do I warm up? How many times up and down the bridge? What pace?

    I have a bridge that spans a four lane road on a nearby trail. I can access it from either 2.25ish or .50ish miles from a parking lot. I have no idea how long it is or the incline. I think it extends longer on one side due to elevation as well. I tried measuring it from a satellite photo and I'm getting anywhere from 136 feet to .18 miles.
    Florida runner here too. My bridge repeats are about a 1/4 mile from base to crest and am able to park close to base. Usually run away from bridge 1/2 mile and turn around for warm up, then do repeats running up (hard pace, ends up being around 5k pace but try and be consistent across all repeats) and running down at recovery pace (slowwww) provides a good time to do repeats (6 early in season building to 10 later in season). Then cool-down of 1 to 2 miles depending on mileage I want to get in which means I can get to the beach for some nice views before finishing.
     

    GreatLakes

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Aug 6, 2015
    Flat Florida runner with a question.

    I want to try and incorporate bridge repeats once a week, but really struggling with my web searches as HOW to do it. How long do I warm up? How many times up and down the bridge? What pace?

    I have a bridge that spans a four lane road on a nearby trail. I can access it from either 2.25ish or .50ish miles from a parking lot. I have no idea how long it is or the incline. I think it extends longer on one side due to elevation as well. I tried measuring it from a satellite photo and I'm getting anywhere from 136 feet to .18 miles.
    Google Earth is the best tool I've found for measuring distance. It will also give you elevation but it sometimes has trouble with bridges. I have a bridge near my house that goes over a freeway. Google Earth thinks I'm running down to the road level below and back up each time.

    As for the question about how, it really depends on your goal. I generally don't do hill repeats, I just go find a hilly route or hit trails, but that is much easier around me than in FL which I sympathize with. I lived in Clearwater when I started running. If you are looking to do hill repeats to build endurance my suggestion would be to do about a mile warm up on the way to the bridge and then do as many as you can without dropping your pace. If the incline is around 1/4 mile just go to the top, if it is much longer I'd stop at 1/4 mile. Don't sprint them but I run them hard and then slowly jog back down as active recovery. When you can't do any more at the same pace jog home.

    If, however, you are looking to get prepared for a hilly race somewhere else the downhill training is just as important as the uphill, in some aspects more important. In that scenario I would do the whole bridge, both up and down, to the other bank, then walk or slowly jog for recovery and go back over. You can still use your time on the ascent to gauge when you are done or just pick a number and increase it over time.
     

    Rogue224

    Earning My Ears
    Joined
    Jan 13, 2021
    Hi everyone, I have finally set up an account to join in the with you all. I started reading the various threads last year under my wife’s account when I signed up to do my first marathon and Dopey Challenge. Then the world changed. I am very thankful for this community reading all the support and stories shared. I hope to that Wine and Dine happens and to also register for Dopey in 2022. Looking forward to the interaction this year!
     

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