STILL NOT RUNNING ?!?!?!

maxiesmom

The Mean Squinty Eye Works
Joined
Jul 6, 2004
Given how long it took them to "rescue" the riders, I'm sure they are looking to improve on that before starting them up again. I saw at least one person point out that if a sudden storm had blown up, they could have had guests in real danger. Three hours is about 2 and a half too long.
 

Meglen

DIS Veteran
Joined
Jul 16, 2016
Who in there right mind would want them up and running before they are givin the all clear from experts. ? This system was up for a week.. not a huge loss when most have yet to even use them. Get it right Disney than reopen don't listen to op.. who clearly just wants to be mad about something.
 
  • gharter

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    May 3, 2004
    This technology is not new. There are many similar systems all over the world. Others have had to have similar issues.
    i expect it will be a few weeks to figure out the problem, come up with a solution and get it approved. Not the first problem Disney has had and it won't be the last.
    The company that built the system should be able to troubleshoot this.
     
    Last edited:

    kaytieeldr

    Post hoc, ergo propter hoc
    Joined
    Jun 11, 2005
    1) Skyliner went down Saturday.
    2) This is Tuesday, early AM, and not running yet.
    Seriously? Less than 60 hours (including a Sunday and two nights) later? We get it. You hate your employer. But geeze. Patience.
    . . No wonder Universal-Orlando just got voted BEST AMUSEMENT PARK IN-THE-WORLD!
    :confused3 By...?
    Not these people https://naijaquest.com/best-amusement-parks-in-the-world/
    Or these https://www.thestreet.com/story/13255418/1/the-10-most-alluring-amusement-parks-in-the-world.html
    Or these https://www.travelchannel.com/interests/amusement-parks/articles/top-10-amusement-parks
    Or these https://traveltriangle.com/blog/best-amusement-parks-in-the-world/ (unless you think Singapore is part of Orlando?) :confused3
     
  • Jax1023

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Nov 30, 2008
    Given how long it took them to "rescue" the riders, I'm sure they are looking to improve on that before starting them up again. I saw at least one person point out that if a sudden storm had blown up, they could have had guests in real danger. Three hours is about 2 and a half too long.
    I find it continually baffling that people thing thunderstorms would have made this issue worse.

    It’s not like the cars are going to blow off the line- these are frequently used in mountainous areas where the winds are extreme.

    And the system is grounded for a lightening strike. It would be like being inside of your car- what is said to be a safe place to be during a storm.


    This link explains that the system is grounded.
     

    maxiesmom

    The Mean Squinty Eye Works
    Joined
    Jul 6, 2004
    I find it continually baffling that people thing thunderstorms would have made this issue worse.

    It’s not like the cars are going to blow off the line- these are frequently used in mountainous areas where the winds are extreme.

    And the system is grounded for a lightening strike. It would be like being inside of your car- what is said to be a safe place to be during a storm.


    This link explains that the system is grounded.

    If the thunderstorm came up as the were actively trying to bring people down, it could have been a big problem. And having guests stranded, with thunder and lighting all around is hardly ideal. I know more than one person who would have a full blown panic attack in that situation.

    The more I read, the more it sounds like Disney is not as prepared as they should be to handle a problem with the skyliner.
     

    TheRustyScupper

    Do all the good you can, to all you can.
    Joined
    Aug 8, 2000
    OK, I don't get the complaint. Would you rather they just say "ok, not a problem, start using it again"? Or is it better that they investigate and at least attempt to fix the problem?

    Don't you work for Disney?
    1) We are CM's.
    2) We don't complain about taking time to fix the problem.
    3) We complain about incompetence in design and implementation.
    4) Gondola systems were never designed to run over 10-mph (WDW is 11-mph).
    5) The 300-car system will be PERMANENTLY plagued with problems and breakdowns.
    6) It was (and is) a bad concept just to reduce leased buses and manpower costs.
    7) Alas, WDW jumped on a concept by consultants and not Imagineers.
    . . . about six years ago, Disney laid-off most of the Imagineering staff
    . . . they dessimated the department!
    . . . they saved manpower, and now rely on consultants
    . . . however, the outsiders do not have the history or experience of Disney rides
    . . . the cannot imagine/design/implement rides and systems as true Imagineers
    8) Now, they have a multi-million-dollar system with MANY future delays and breakdowns!

    NOTE:
    . . . I am a retired engineer in vehicles and transportation systems
    . . . I worked for Top-150 worldwide companies
    . . . before running plants in four countries, I worked on and in mass-transit systems

    . . . I speak from experience, and not opinion.
     
  • TheRustyScupper

    Do all the good you can, to all you can.
    Joined
    Aug 8, 2000
    I find it continually baffling that people thing thunderstorms would have made this issue worse.

    It’s not like the cars are going to blow off the line- these are frequently used in mountainous areas where the winds are extreme.

    And the system is grounded for a lightening strike. It would be like being inside of your car- what is said to be a safe place to be during a storm.


    This link explains that the system is grounded.
    1) When winds exceed 35-mph, the system is halted.
    2) When there are lightning "indicators" in the area, all Disney outside rides are halted.
    . . . there are devices and systems that show lightning with 5-miles
    . . . just like a golf course, outside activities are halted
    . . . a "code" alerts all CM's to cease outside activities and rides
    3) It must be noted that "grounded" or not, lightning can hurt people.
     

    sam_gordon

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jun 26, 2010
    1) We are CM's.
    2) We don't complain about taking time to fix the problem.
    3) We complain about incompetence in design and implementation.
    4) Gondola systems were never designed to run over 10-mph (WDW is 11-mph).
    5) The 300-car system will be PERMANENTLY plagued with problems and breakdowns.
    6) It was (and is) a bad concept just to reduce leased buses and manpower costs.
    7) Alas, WDW jumped on a concept by consultants and not Imagineers.
    . . . about six years ago, Disney laid-off most of the Imagineering staff
    . . . they dessimated the department!
    . . . they saved manpower, and now rely on consultants
    . . . however, the outsiders do not have the history or experience of Disney rides
    . . . the cannot imagine/design/implement rides and systems as true Imagineers
    8) Now, they have a multi-million-dollar system with MANY future delays and breakdowns!

    NOTE:
    . . . I am a retired engineer in vehicles and transportation systems
    . . . I worked for Top-150 worldwide companies
    . . . before running plants in four countries, I worked on and in mass-transit systems

    . . . I speak from experience, and not opinion.
    Let me put this terms you understand...

    1) None of this has anything to do with your original post
    2) You said the accident happened Saturday
    3) They weren't running Tuesday.
    4) I asked a simple question
    5) Did you want them to put it back in service quicker
    6) Or investigate to find out what the problem was?
    7) You apparently don't know what qualifies as an "opinion".
    8) Your above number 5, 6, and 8 (possibly 7 but I'll give you that one) are all OPINIONS.
     

    Dis703

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Aug 24, 2010
    I find it continually baffling that people thing thunderstorms would have made this issue worse.

    It’s not like the cars are going to blow off the line- these are frequently used in mountainous areas where the winds are extreme.

    And the system is grounded for a lightening strike. It would be like being inside of your car- what is said to be a safe place to be during a storm.


    This link explains that the system is grounded.
    They might be safe in their gondola, but not when it comes time to rescue them. They have to exit and enter a bucket on top of a ladder completely exposed and high up in the middle of the air. That is never going to be a safe idea in the middle of a thunderstorm. So the rescue would have to be delayed to wait for storms to pass and no doubt many guests would be pretty terrified to be up there for an extended timeframe during a storm. Having 3 children (two who are autistic) that are terrified of lightning, I can't even imagine the panic that would ensue.
     

    kaytieeldr

    Post hoc, ergo propter hoc
    Joined
    Jun 11, 2005
    1) We are CM's.
    We? Are there other CMs with you?
    2) We don't complain about taking time to fix the problem.
    Posting a new ranting thread with the subject in all caps less than 36 hours after the incident is the epitome of complaining.
    3) We complain about incompetence in design and implementation.
    You should take that up with Doppelmayr. With almost 130 years of experience and over 15,000 gondola lines worldwide, they might tend to disagree
    4) Gondola systems were never designed to run over 10-mph (WDW is 11-mph)
    .
    I believe this is wrong.
    5) The 300-car system will be PERMANENTLY plagued with problems and breakdowns.
    Really, anybody with this opinion should strongly consider a career change. To Psychic.
    6) It was (and is) a bad concept just to reduce leased buses and manpower costs
    Ah. So nothing at all to do with more people faster with less fossil fuel.
    7) Alas, WDW jumped on a concept by consultants and not Imagineers
    Again, Doppelmayr has existed since the late 19th century. Over 15,000 systems installed believe the opinion that this is a concept, or that Imagineers should have been involved.
    1) When winds exceed 35-mph, the system is halted.
    And? How often do winds in Central Florida even approach that speed?
    2) When there are lightning "indicators" in the area, all Disney outside rides are halted
    1) The Skyliner is not a ride. It is transportation. Reportedly grounded (from lightning) transportation.
     


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