Real ID: Married Women Beware!

Joined
Oct 23, 2015
Don’t you think this name change tradition is weird?
The actual choice made by any individual to change their name is not weird to me. Cultures from around the world have different norms for names when it comes to life changing events like marriage. And TBH laws thoughout the world in other countries don't always suit the desires of the citizens. For instance I don't think many of us here would like being told a law prohibits you from taking your husband's last name if you desire to but there are places where you cannot do that.

I think the social expectation for a woman in the U.S. to exclusively take her husband's last name that unfortunately is still prevalent is weird if using your word. As time goes on it will likely even out more. I guess you could say that in the U.S. we at least legally have a choice aside from archaic laws that may still exist in places it's a cultural norm that individuals are up against.

Creating a new last name wasn't really heard of all that long ago for instance. It's still a small small minority but it exists and part of that equation too is how same-sex couples opt to do things when/if they get married as that is one main situation where you might have a couple creating their own last name. Woman keeping their names is still a small minority but it exists and so does hyphenating. I expect over time these variations will become more common. Probably won't out pace women taking their husband's last names until the majority of the U.S. culture adjusts and no longer sees that as a must do.
 

RamblingMad

DIS Veteran
Joined
Mar 29, 2019
The actual choice made by any individual to change their name is not weird to me. Cultures from around the world have different norms for names when it comes to life changing events like marriage. And TBH laws thoughout the world in other countries don't always suit the desires of the citizens. For instance I don't think many of us here would like being told a law prohibits you from taking your husband's last name if you desire to but there are places where you cannot do that.

I think the social expectation for a woman in the U.S. to exclusively take her husband's last name that unfortunately is still prevalent is weird if using your word. As time goes on it will likely even out more. I guess you could say that in the U.S. we at least legally have a choice aside from archaic laws that may still exist in places it's a cultural norm that individuals are up against.

Creating a new last name wasn't really heard of all that long ago for instance. It's still a small small minority but it exists and part of that equation too is how same-sex couples opt to do things when/if they get married as that is one main situation where you might have a couple creating their own last name. Woman keeping their names is still a small minority but it exists and so does hyphenating. I expect over time these variations will become more common. Probably won't out pace women taking their husband's last names until the majority of the U.S. culture adjusts and no longer sees that as a must do.
The whole engagement ring thing was strictly good marketing, so that history is pretty tainted.

No idea how far back the name change thing goes.

But I think it should be a choice, not an expectation.
 
  • disneyseniors

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jun 2, 2014
    You don't need a Real ID until next October. You'll be fine to travel in the Spring with your regular Drivers License.
    Wow, Is that right??? I guess I don't have to stress so much. When I was told my DL that's due in December couldn't be used for travel or "anything" if I didn't get a realID, that was wrong? I sure hope so. Thanks, Searc!
     

    disneyseniors

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jun 2, 2014
    Are there other documents you can use instead of a birth certificate? My birth certificate is in German (Army brat born in Germany). I do have a Certification of Birth Abroad (with my birth name). I suppose I would need that along with my marriage certificate?
    I don't know how it works for foreign BC's, but I also had a "certificate of Birth" which was not accepted at the DMV. I am awaiting a certified copy of the original BC from my home state. I wonder just WHY did they issue these certificates, if they are not legally acceptable???
     

    disneychrista

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Dec 26, 2002
    I don't know how it works for foreign BC's, but I also had a "certificate of Birth" which was not accepted at the DMV. I am awaiting a certified copy of the original BC from my home state. I wonder just WHY did they issue these certificates, if they are not legally acceptable???
    The one from the hospital with the footprints? That is commemorative, not an official birth certificate, which is issued from the county/state.
     
  • bcla

    On our rugged Eastern foothills.....
    Joined
    Nov 28, 2012
    I don't know how it works for foreign BC's, but I also had a "certificate of Birth" which was not accepted at the DMV. I am awaiting a certified copy of the original BC from my home state. I wonder just WHY did they issue these certificates, if they are not legally acceptable???
    There are a lot of different, older forms that may not conform to certain requirements. I've heard of some that didn't include an official seal. Pretty much every city/county/state these days follow the State Department's minimum requirements for passport applications based on jus soli US citizenship.

    Even then - if an older form meets the requirements there's no reason why they can't be accepted.
     

    bcla

    On our rugged Eastern foothills.....
    Joined
    Nov 28, 2012
    The one from the hospital with the footprints? That is commemorative, not an official birth certificate, which is issued from the county/state.
    I think some governments have issued birth certificates that for one reason or another weren't acceptable because they didn't include certain anti counterfeiting features or didn't contain required information. For example, I've seen some forms that didn't include the name of the parents unless the requestor specifically asked for that to be printed.
     

    Diznygrl

    Disneyland Fanatic
    Joined
    Jul 8, 2005
    Wow, Is that right??? I guess I don't have to stress so much. When I was told my DL that's due in December couldn't be used for travel or "anything" if I didn't get a realID, that was wrong? I sure hope so. Thanks, Searc!
    (Not Searc, but I'll answer anyway) You can still use a regular ID to get on an airplane UNTIL October 2020. That is when the law will officially take effect and you will no longer be able to fly without a Real ID or passport. A normal ID will still be valid for everything else you might need identification for (like it will still count as a valid driver's license) but the Real ID will be required for flying or entering federal buildings.
     

    jo-jo

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Feb 28, 2011
    (Not Searc, but I'll answer anyway) You can still use a regular ID to get on an airplane UNTIL October 2020. That is when the law will officially take effect and you will no longer be able to fly without a Real ID or passport. A normal ID will still be valid for everything else you might need identification for (like it will still count as a valid driver's license) but the Real ID will be required for flying or entering federal buildings.
    Or if you don't have Real ID, a passport card or passport book, will work for air travel????
     
  • Joined
    Oct 23, 2015
    Wow, Is that right??? I guess I don't have to stress so much. When I was told my DL that's due in December couldn't be used for travel or "anything" if I didn't get a realID, that was wrong? I sure hope so. Thanks, Searc!
    The anything part was wrong so long as you renew your license in December when it expires.

    If you renew without getting a REAL ID you will need to use a Passport or Passport Card for travel or Federal buildings once October 2020 hits. OR if your state allows you can off-schedule get a REAL ID at that time if that makes sense.
     

    bcla

    On our rugged Eastern foothills.....
    Joined
    Nov 28, 2012
    Or if you don't have Real ID, a passport card or passport book, will work for air travel????
    There's a list that DHS and TSA have of other acceptable IDs other than Real ID compliant driver licenses and state IDs.

    No. TSA accepts several other forms of identity documents. For more information on acceptable forms of identification for boarding aircraft, please visit TSA’s website at https://www.tsa.gov/travel/security-screening/identification.​
    Starting October 1, 2020, every state and territory resident will need to present a REAL ID compliant license/ID, or another acceptable form of identification, for accessing Federal facilities, entering nuclear power plants, and boarding commercial aircraft. The card, itself, must be REAL ID compliant unless the resident is using an alternative acceptable document such as a passport. The Act does not require individuals to present identification where it is not currently required to access a Federal facility (such as to enter the public areas of the Smithsonian) nor does it prohibit an agency from accepting other forms of identity documents (such as a U.S. passport or passport card).​

    I'll just give an example of something other than air travel where I needed to provide ID. Last year we went to San Francisco to get our child a passport on short notice. To enter the federal building we needed to show our IDs. I used my passport card, although now it's expired.

    Theoretically someone with a foreign passport could use that, and there are some US dual-citizens with foreign passports. This is the TSA's list:

    • Driver's licenses or other state photo identity cards issued by Department of Motor Vehicles (or equivalent)
    • U.S. passport
    • U.S. passport card
    • DHS trusted traveler cards (Global Entry, NEXUS, SENTRI, FAST)
    • U.S. Department of Defense ID, including IDs issued to dependents
    • Permanent resident card
    • Border crossing card
    • State-issued Enhanced Driver’s License
    • Federally recognized, tribal-issued photo ID
    • HSPD-12 PIV card
    • Foreign government-issued passport
    • Canadian provincial driver's license or Indian and Northern Affairs Canada card
    • Transportation worker identification credential
    • U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Employment Authorization Card (I-766)
    • U.S. Merchant Mariner Credential

    The driver licenses are probably limited to the US and Canada because it would be impractical to be able to cover thousands of different driver licenses around the world. Just the other day I saw someone with an out of state license at bar getting IDed where the bartender whipped out a book to compare to a sample photo. At TSA checkpoints they probably have a way to reference all acceptable forms of ID.
     

    chattadisser

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Apr 15, 2010
    Here's the part that makes no sense to me. I have TSA pre-check, provided all the materials they wanted at the time, and a passport which required additional documentation. I went into the DMV as my DL was going to expire. Figured I might as well get the REAL ID while I was there. Brought my passport, W2, DL and 2 additional proofs of residency. First woman at the DMV said "good to go" gave me paperwork to fill out (which ironically asked for name and address which is on all the documentation I just handed her). Then I go to the second woman and she won't give me a REAL ID as my DL has first name, middle name, maiden name, last name and my passport had first name, maiden name and last name. She says that since they don't match exactly that I can't get it. So if the federal government is ok with my information and willing to give me a passport and pre-check, why does the DMV need anymore? I'll just travel with my passport, I have no urge to deal with the shenanigans of the DMV. I do think it negatively affects those who have name changes wether it is due to marriage or by choice.
     

    Lilsia

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Feb 17, 2018
    Here's the part that makes no sense to me. I have TSA pre-check, provided all the materials they wanted at the time, and a passport which required additional documentation. I went into the DMV as my DL was going to expire. Figured I might as well get the REAL ID while I was there. Brought my passport, W2, DL and 2 additional proofs of residency. First woman at the DMV said "good to go" gave me paperwork to fill out (which ironically asked for name and address which is on all the documentation I just handed her). Then I go to the second woman and she won't give me a REAL ID as my DL has first name, middle name, maiden name, last name and my passport had first name, maiden name and last name. She says that since they don't match exactly that I can't get it. So if the federal government is ok with my information and willing to give me a passport and pre-check, why does the DMV need anymore? I'll just travel with my passport, I have no urge to deal with the shenanigans of the DMV. I do think it negatively affects those who have name changes wether it is due to marriage or by choice.
    Did you ask to speak to a manager? It sounds like the employees are confused.
     

    chattadisser

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Apr 15, 2010
    Did you ask to speak to a manager? It sounds like the employees are confused.
    No, when I asked why it was fine with the first employee, woman number told me "I don't know but your not getting one". She was your stereotypical DMV employee. Since I can just travel with my passport I wasn't into the argument. Just got my new DL and went on. I may go back at a later date and try again but who knows??
     

    disneyseniors

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jun 2, 2014
    The one from the hospital with the footprints? That is commemorative, not an official birth certificate, which is issued from the county/state.
    No I never got one of those foot print ones apparently. So, it wasn't that. Honestly, when my Mom gave me the folded over paper in an envelop, I just filed it away. I have never needed it before. Then I find out what I had wasn't legal, but it was supposed to be the "real" one given to me by my mother. I don't have a clue why I would be given one (or my Mom in that instance) that isn't legal???? Oh well, now I know:)
     

    EACarlson

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    Jan 27, 2019
    There's a list that DHS and TSA have of other acceptable IDs other than Real ID compliant driver licenses and state IDs.

    No. TSA accepts several other forms of identity documents. For more information on acceptable forms of identification for boarding aircraft, please visit TSA’s website at https://www.tsa.gov/travel/security-screening/identification.​
    Starting October 1, 2020, every state and territory resident will need to present a REAL ID compliant license/ID, or another acceptable form of identification, for accessing Federal facilities, entering nuclear power plants, and boarding commercial aircraft. The card, itself, must be REAL ID compliant unless the resident is using an alternative acceptable document such as a passport. The Act does not require individuals to present identification where it is not currently required to access a Federal facility (such as to enter the public areas of the Smithsonian) nor does it prohibit an agency from accepting other forms of identity documents (such as a U.S. passport or passport card).​

    I'll just give an example of something other than air travel where I needed to provide ID. Last year we went to San Francisco to get our child a passport on short notice. To enter the federal building we needed to show our IDs. I used my passport card, although now it's expired.

    Theoretically someone with a foreign passport could use that, and there are some US dual-citizens with foreign passports. This is the TSA's list:

    • Driver's licenses or other state photo identity cards issued by Department of Motor Vehicles (or equivalent)
    • U.S. passport
    • U.S. passport card
    • DHS trusted traveler cards (Global Entry, NEXUS, SENTRI, FAST)
    • U.S. Department of Defense ID, including IDs issued to dependents
    • Permanent resident card
    • Border crossing card
    • State-issued Enhanced Driver’s License
    • Federally recognized, tribal-issued photo ID
    • HSPD-12 PIV card
    • Foreign government-issued passport
    • Canadian provincial driver's license or Indian and Northern Affairs Canada card
    • Transportation worker identification credential
    • U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Employment Authorization Card (I-766)
    • U.S. Merchant Mariner Credential

    The driver licenses are probably limited to the US and Canada because it would be impractical to be able to cover thousands of different driver licenses around the world. Just the other day I saw someone with an out of state license at bar getting IDed where the bartender whipped out a book to compare to a sample photo. At TSA checkpoints they probably have a way to reference all acceptable forms of ID.
    Is this the current list or the list of acceptable documents in October, 2020? My tribal ID card looks like something made by a 6th grader on his schools laminating machine, don't know how TSA in low native areas would react to me showing that.
     

    LysieLee

    Earning My Ears
    Joined
    May 30, 2019
    I had one and I didn't even know it. They never asked if I wanted one, or asked for any further information or documentation.
     



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