New England Themed Resorts - How Many Are There, And How Is This A Thing??

OppR2nist

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Jun 26, 2020
So, I'm from New England. I'm aware of at least The Yacht Club near Boardwalk, and The Newport Bay Club in Paris. Are there other New England themed resorts on Disney property?

Another question: How did New England become such an integral part of Disney? Between those two resorts, AND Columbia Harbor House, I could very easily enjoy something resembling home as far away at least as Paris. Might seem like a silly little detail, but it is kind of odd to me as a native of New England. Plus I know we're into silly little details here.
 

Smugpugmug

DIS Veteran
Joined
Mar 3, 2022
Not a hotel but Tokyo Disneysea has a New England themed land. When I visited the park, I remember thinking it was very weird to see a land dedicated to Cape Cod in the middle of Japan.

Not my picture but just imagine that this wasn't taken in New England but rather in a Disney theme park in Japan.
 

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OppR2nist

Grim Grinning Ghost Out to Socialize...
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Jun 26, 2020
Not a hotel but Tokyo Disneysea has a New England themed land. When I visited the park, I remember thinking it was very weird to see a land dedicated to Cape Cod in the middle of Japan.

Not my picture but just imagine that this wasn't taken in New England but rather in a Disney theme park in Japan.
I could easily get a similar view about a 10 minute drive from my house. That's too funny.
 

OppR2nist

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Joined
Jun 26, 2020
Not a hotel but Tokyo Disneysea has a New England themed land. When I visited the park, I remember thinking it was very weird to see a land dedicated to Cape Cod in the middle of Japan.

Not my picture but just imagine that this wasn't taken in New England but rather in a Disney theme park in Japan.
Just looked it up on Google, and the pictures of the harbor area look like my home town. I'm officially freaking out over this.
 

Smugpugmug

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Mar 3, 2022

Dug720

See the line where the sky meets the sea?
Joined
Feb 16, 2012
As to "How is this a theme?" - the same could be said for many.

Why put a resort with the feel of the Pacific Northwest there? Or New Orleans? Or a Boardwalk? Polynesia? Or why copy a hotel from California and call it the Grand Floridian?
 

OppR2nist

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As to "How is this a theme?" - the same could be said for many.

Why put a resort with the feel of the Pacific Northwest there? Or New Orleans? Or a Boardwalk? Polynesia? Or why copy a hotel from California and call it the Grand Floridian?
It's just really funny to me that, now, in my forties, that the place where I grew up was a tourist destination the whole time. I'm always trying to get away from New England (not because I don't love where I live, just wanting to see new things), and yet I'm finding it's influence all over the place. It's fascinating to me.
 

crazy4wdw

Co-Moderator, Restaurant Board
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Jan 3, 2001
Michael Eisner had an interest in architecture and when he was CEO of Disney, he brought in several top architects to the company. One was Robert A. M. Stern who had an interest in New England architecture and had designed homes on the east coast in that style. So when he was asked to design resorts for the Epcot resort area, he naturally developed resorts with a New England theme - the Yacht and Beach Club Resorts. He also designed the Boardwalk and Newport Bay Club at Disneyland Paris.

He designed the Casting Center at Walt Disney World and the Feature Animation Building on the Disney Studios lot in Burbank.
 
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OppR2nist

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Michael Eisner had an interest in architecture and when he was CEO of Disney, he brought in several top architects to the company. One was Robert A. M. Stern who had an interest in New England architecture and had designed homes on the east coast in that style. So when he was asked to design resorts for the Epcot resort area, he naturally developed resorts with a New England theme - the Yacht and Beach Club Resorts. He also designed the Boardwalk and Newport Bay Club at Disneyland Paris.

He designed the Casting Center at Walt Disney World and the Feature Animation Building on the Disney Studios lot in Burbank.
That explains a lot. In fairness, I grew up where Moby Dick was written, so I get that there's cultural interest, but it never struck me as something so popular that I'd find it in Florida. It's good to know there was indeed something behind it all.
 

Mrs.AMC

DIS Veteran
Joined
Dec 15, 2021
So, I'm from New England. I'm aware of at least The Yacht Club near Boardwalk, and The Newport Bay Club in Paris. Are there other New England themed resorts on Disney property?

Another question: How did New England become such an integral part of Disney? Between those two resorts, AND Columbia Harbor House, I could very easily enjoy something resembling home as far away at least as Paris. Might seem like a silly little detail, but it is kind of odd to me as a native of New England. Plus I know we're into silly little details here.
I'm guessing some of it is related to it being a symbol for the beginning of our country so it's a symbol of the US in general?
 

OppR2nist

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I'm guessing some of it is related to it being a symbol for the beginning of our country so it's a symbol of the US in general?
I see that as a possibility, but the focus seems to be more about the culture of small fishing towns along the coast as opposed to Revolutionary War aesthetic. Liberty Square covers that pretty well, and the Columbia Harbor House is the only part that is specifically New England focused.
 

Pea-n-Me

DIS Veteran
Joined
Jul 18, 2004
Just looking up the history of Liberty Tree Tavern.

I never knew this, but knew there was a reason I liked it!

https://mouseearstv.com/disney-world/liberty-tree-tavern/

”Liberty Tree Tavern’s historic significance starts with the fact that the Liberty Tree is a well-known Boston landmark. The famous elm tree was the site of protests planned by colonists in Boston. When those protests were successfully completed, residents would celebrate by hanging lanterns in the tree. (Lanterns? Like Tangled? Yup, this history was just asking to be Disney-fied.)

An oak replica of the Liberty Tree is located next to the Disney tavern, and swinging from its branches are 13 hanging lanterns. These lanterns represent each of the 13 colonies that originally made up America. Directly behind the tree lies the Hall of Presidents, a staple of Disney Worldand one of its most visited attractions.“


But yes, I get the beach-y vibe vs revolutionary vibe as a thing, as well.
 

ellbell

DIS Veteran
Joined
Jul 8, 2014
It's just really funny to me that, now, in my forties, that the place where I grew up was a tourist destination the whole time. I'm always trying to get away from New England (not because I don't love where I live, just wanting to see new things), and yet I'm finding it's influence all over the place. It's fascinating to me.
Many people enjoy New England for travel. Cruises have a whole itinerary for New England and Canada.
 

VeronicaZS

DIS Veteran
Joined
Mar 23, 2016
I wouldn't say it is an integral part of Disney, there are 32 Disney resorts in Disney World alone and I'll bet over 100 restaurants. Disney World and the whole Disney empire is so massive it doesn't seem that odd to have a few hotels and restaurants with a particular theme.🤷‍♀️
 








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