Wisdom teeth removal = legal and encouraged child abuse?

Discussion in 'Community Board' started by kdonnel, Jan 11, 2019.

  1. kdonnel

    kdonnel DVC-BCV

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2001
    Messages:
    1,712
    My 19 year old daughter had her un-erupted wisdom teeth removed on January 2nd at the recommendation of her orthodontist and regular dentist. At the pre op appointment the oral surgeon listed an entirely different set of reasons why it was a good idea as well.

    On the 6th as she was preparing to return to college she said that it was obvious to her now that wisdom teeth removal was legal and encouraged child abuse.

    My wife and I both still have all our wisdom teeth. In my case I have one that came in during my 30's and three that still lay dorment. My wife has all 4 in and providing much of her chewing power.

    It really makes me hesitant to have my sons removed in a couple years. It is one of those things you never know if it helped or not because you can't live you life with and without to compare.
     
  2. Soldier's*Sweeties

    Soldier's*Sweeties DIS Veteran

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2009
    Messages:
    11,524
    My dentist and my son’s highly regarded orthodontist have said to leave them unless they expect them to be, or are causing, issues. My sons will have to be removed because he doesn’t even have room for the adult teeth still coming in. I still have mine because I have plenty of space.

    I don’t think preventative care with evidence is abuse. But I can see an argument for unnecessary procedures.
     
    Jaime4004, JoanneAZ, robinb and 3 others like this.
  3. Avatar

    Advertisement


  4. kimblebee

    kimblebee now my thoughts will be worth 5 cents

    Joined:
    May 28, 2009
    Messages:
    11,239

    Child abuse? She’s an adult. Did you force her to do it?
     
  5. fizbobunny

    fizbobunny Mouseketeer

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2006
    Messages:
    471
    My whole head xray showed mine growing at an angle towards my other teeth, so they were removed as a teen.
    Not just as a matter of routine
     
  6. Floridaman999

    Floridaman999 Livin' the life

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2017
    Messages:
    1,248
    How is a medical procedure completed on an adult considered child abuse? I'm so confused that I can't even.
     
  7. smiths02

    smiths02 DIS Veteran

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2009
    Messages:
    5,394
    I have a "bite," but I had very straight teeth until college when my wisdom teeth started to try to come down. I could not afford the procedure (neither could my mom). Once married (just a few years later), my DH had okay insurance for us and I saved that $1000 (my part of the payment), and I got them removed.
    My DH had it done when he was 15 or so because his parents could afford it. He didn't have to suffer the headaches and the pushed around teeth.
     
  8. kimblebee

    kimblebee now my thoughts will be worth 5 cents

    Joined:
    May 28, 2009
    Messages:
    11,239
    Great minds think alike.
     
    mousefan73 and Floridaman999 like this.
  9. smiths02

    smiths02 DIS Veteran

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2009
    Messages:
    5,394
    My point was that you can live your live with if you can't afford to have them removed in time. It was not pleasant.
     
  10. Klayfish

    Klayfish DIS Veteran

    Joined:
    May 19, 2016
    Messages:
    7,483
    Is the entire point of this just :stir: ???

    Sigh....

    Yeah, it's not a fun procedure. I had it when I was 16 or 17, but it is what it is. Had I known it was child abuse, I'd have sued and would be rich now....LOL
     
  11. Floridaman999

    Floridaman999 Livin' the life

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2017
    Messages:
    1,248
    It appears to be a new theme.
     
  12. Soldier's*Sweeties

    Soldier's*Sweeties DIS Veteran

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2009
    Messages:
    11,524
    Some people can’t. They get infllammed and can lead to systemic blood and bone infection. That’s where the preventative measure comes in.
     
  13. Allison

    Allison DIS Veteran

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2005
    Messages:
    16,155
    That's a tad dramatic.
     
  14. JaxDad

    JaxDad DIS Veteran

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2014
    Messages:
    2,816
    I had mine removed right after I joined the military. I assumed the military dentists just practiced stuff on new guys. They used valium to make us loopy for the procedure, and then required us to spend the night in the hospital. The funniest part was that we checked in to the hospital before the procedure in our uniforms, then were required to wear hospital gowns. We rode in an ambulance, literally across the street from the hospital, and the only footwear we had was our military boots, so we wore those with the gowns for the transit. It was pretty comical.
     
  15. FindingTheMouse

    FindingTheMouse Mouseketeer

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2017
    Messages:
    141
    I had mine out when I was 16. I was told that my mouth would not accommodate my wisdom teeth when they came in. After the surgery I pretty much slept the entire day, and on pain meds for a couple of days, but was fully active only 2 days after the procedure. Everyone's tolerance of pain is different, but just because the procedure may be painful for some does not make it abuse.
     
    emmybee likes this.
  16. Hikergirl

    Hikergirl DIS Veteran

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2016
    Messages:
    7,786
    I think it is kind of routine and not needed in a alot of cases. I would bet most people would have been just fine if they weren't taken out, but just because there is a big push for it doesn't mean it's abuse. I think it is more about money, and how easily manipulated parents can be when they hear that their child "needs" something medically "necessary".
    My dd was supposed to have hers out right before she left for school in August because they were bothering her. It was too close to her leaving so we decided to wait until she came home for winter break. Now they aren't bothering her so she wants to put it off until she is back home for the summer. At this rate she may not have them out at all.
     
  17. ronandannette

    ronandannette I gave myself this tag and I "Like" myself too!

    Joined:
    May 4, 2006
    Messages:
    12,495
    I’ll go with your daughter just being a whiner. :sad2:
     
  18. jrmasm

    jrmasm Last time I checked, it was still

    Joined:
    May 20, 2000
    Messages:
    8,751
    A tad?

    :rolleyes1
     
  19. aprilchem

    aprilchem DIS Veteran

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2013
    Messages:
    2,244
    Thats kind of a silly thing for her to say. She is an adult, not a child. If it was medically necessary it should be done, but it was her decision to do it, not yours.

    FWIW, though, had I the chance to do it again I would not have had my wisdom teeth removed, even though one of mine was coming in sideways. I had complications and it was worst pain I have experienced in my life (worse than the 3 c-sections I've had and all the other ailments or illnesses). I almost had to quit graduate school because of it. But it was my choice to do it (I was 23).
     
  20. kdonnel

    kdonnel DVC-BCV

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2001
    Messages:
    1,712
    Sure she was being dramatic but she had been in near constant pain for four days, unable to open her mouth, unable to eat, I'll cut her some slack on the drama.

    It was not pleasant watching what she had to go through and as a voluntary but heavily doctor and parent pressured procedure with no ability to know for sure if in the long run it even provides any benefit I am not sure how I should handle my son in a few years when the doctors start down the same path.
     
    Turksmom likes this.
  21. mnrose

    mnrose Queen of all she surveys

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2009
    Messages:
    5,562
    If having wisdom teeth removed is "abuse", then circumcision certainly is. That's a defenseless baby.

    In many people, having wisdom teeth removed is absolutely essential to long term health. It also is not that bad. Good grief. Your daughter is going to experience much more difficult medical/dental procedures in her life. Hate to break it to her....

    I'll also say this. Having them out when you are younger is MUCH easier than having to have them removed when you are older because they've rotted all to hell. Young people heal quicker and easier than older. Just a fact.

    Both my kids will likely need theirs removed in a few years. We've encouraged them to do it while they are still on our dental plan. It's not cheap and having good dental insurance will make it easier than paying on their own once they are off our plan.
     
    MillauFr, emmybee, keiraliz and 9 others like this.

Share This Page