What do you feel it will be like for us when WDW opens again using our mobility wheelchairs & scooters?

Lsdolphin

DIS Veteran
Joined
Aug 3, 2013
Can anyone tell me how the process of loading an ECV onto busses is currently working? I know that prior to COVID there was a designated waiting spot for an ECV and drivers would usually be willing to assist with actually parking the ECV once it was driven onto bus but now with bus zones and social distancing lines I’m not sure how it is working.
 

RaySharpton

Retired and going to Disney.
Joined
Oct 28, 2000
Can anyone tell me how the process of loading an ECV onto busses is currently working? I know that prior to COVID there was a designated waiting spot for an ECV and drivers would usually be willing to assist with actually parking the ECV once it was driven onto the bus but now with bus zones and social distancing lines I’m not sure how it is working.
I won't arrive until December, but I have been asking and researching the same question.

This is an article at https://www.wdwinfo.com/walt-disney-world/dining/accessibility-at-disney-world-during-the-pandemic/ where I asked this question.

I preface the following that things are constantly changing and some bus stops like CR use the same stop for multiple parks. I saw one photo where the single bus line all the way back near the CR entrance.

With longer lines at openings and closings, the lines may extend much further past a particular bus stop queue.

Supposedly, a cast member will pull a wheelchair out of that line for loading the bus.

Kelly Mack Ray Sharpton6 hours ago
Hi Ray, glad my article was helpful! The buses were different this time as they had everyone waiting in one long line and we only got pulled aside for the ramp boarding when we reached the front. Previously wheelchairs waited separately up front, but guessing they changed this process due to needing more space for physical distancing in line.
If you're courious about how the bus looks now inside with the different assigned section, I started a thread on the transportation board.


It wasn't very well received by some, but I am used to that using a wheelchair.

I just thought maybe other non-wheelchair users might help by taking photos

I am not sure, but I wonder if the cast member at the bus stop loads the rear of the bus first and then load the wheelchairs.

It is interesting to hear all of the changes.

I just wish I could find more recent ADA trip reports.
 

Lsdolphin

DIS Veteran
Joined
Aug 3, 2013
I won't arrive until December, but I have been asking and researching the same question.

This is an article at https://www.wdwinfo.com/walt-disney-world/dining/accessibility-at-disney-world-during-the-pandemic/ where I asked this question.

I preface the following that things are constantly changing and some bus stops like CR use the same stop for multiple parks. I saw one photo where the single bus line all the way back near the CR entrance.

With longer lines at openings and closings, the lines may extend much further past a particular bus stop queue.

Supposedly, a cast member will pull a wheelchair out of that line for loading the bus.



If you're courious about how the bus looks now inside with the different assigned section, I started a thread on the transportation board.


It wasn't very well received by some, but I am used to that using a wheelchair.

I just thought maybe other non-wheelchair users might help by taking photos

I am not sure, but I wonder if the cast member at the bus stop loads the rear of the bus first and then load the wheelchairs.

It is interesting to hear all of the changes.

I just wish I could find more recent ADA trip reports.

Thank you. I’m wondering whether the bus drivers still assist with positioning the ECV s once up the ramp onto the bus...or if they are no longer allowed to touch the ECVs.
 
  • RaySharpton

    Retired and going to Disney.
    Joined
    Oct 28, 2000
    Thank you. I’m wondering whether the bus drivers still assist with positioning the ECV s once up the ramp onto the bus...or if they are no longer allowed to touch the ECVs.
    I found it interesting the aforementioned article said she saw a lot of mobility scooters at the resorts, but she said she didn't see any mobility scooters on her bus travels.

    I would imagine the bus drivers will still assist guests with "positioning the ECV s once up the ramp onto the bus." They still have to reach down to tie down the mobility scooter on the front and rear. And then help with the seat belt. And reverse the procedure at the destination.

    I feel confident the bus driver will help anyone that needs help.

    Are you arriving before me?

    I'll be there in December, God willing.
     

    Lsdolphin

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Aug 3, 2013
    I found it interesting the aforementioned article said she saw a lot of mobility scooters at the resorts, but she said she didn't see any mobility scooters on her bus travels.

    I would imagine the bus drivers will still assist guests with "positioning the ECV s once up the ramp onto the bus." They still have to reach down to tie down the mobility scooter on the front and rear. And then help with the seat belt. And reverse the procedure at the destination.

    I feel confident the bus driver will help anyone that needs help.

    Are you arriving before me?

    I'll be there in December, God willing.
    Thank you for your information. I will be at GDT 12/3-12/9.
     
  • RaySharpton

    Retired and going to Disney.
    Joined
    Oct 28, 2000
    Post #431-An Accessibility Review of Disneyland Paris - DIS Kelly Mack - Posted on October 7, 2020.

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    During a summer trip to Paris last year, my husband (Richard) and I combined two of our passions: international travel and Disney! We’ve made 10 visits to Disney World in Orlando together, but had never visited any of the parks outside the United States until this trip.

    While planning a trip to Paris to celebrate our 10th wedding anniversary, we decided it was a priority to plan a day trip out to Disneyland Paris to experience the beauty of one of Disney’s international parks and compare it to our beloved Disney World. One unique twist to add: I am a wheelchair user, so we were very interested in exploring the accessibility of the Paris park.

    One of the reasons we keep going back to Disney World every year is that it is one of the most accessible places on earth. I never have to worry about feeling left out because I can participate in so many attractions, activities, shows, parades, dining experiences, and so much more. While every individual’s disability may provide various challenges, I find Disney World’s attention to accessible design and their staff’s attitude towards inclusion to be top-notch and a warm welcome.

    While there are a couple of attractions that I cannot experience at Disney World because I cannot make the transfer from my wheelchair with my mobility disability (lack of strength and flexibility are my greatest challenges), they are notably some of the older ones that were not designed with access in mind. Yet, these attractions are a handful compared to the vast entirety of the parks, so I never find myself lacking options.

    In preparation for Disneyland Paris, Richard did extensive research to learn as much about accessibility in advance as possible. First, we had to find out how best to travel from our hotel in central Paris to the park. It was a lucky happenstance that the hotel we booked was a couple blocks from a train station with a line going directly to the park! (More on that later.)

    We also discovered that it would be helpful to visit Guest Services on our arrival and get a Disability Access Pass. For this, I needed a doctor’s letter describing my disability and that I use a wheelchair. The pass would be presented to park staff so that they could tell us about the access of the attractions and guide us to the accessible entrance (if available). Richard also researched accessibility of the Disneyland Paris attractions, but the information was rather limited online and we were not certain what all to expect until we visited the park ourselves.

    As experienced Disney park visitors, we naturally also researched restaurant options, attraction priorities, and what to expect overall from a visit to Disneyland Paris. Since we only had one day, we made a list of certain things we wanted to see and planned to only visit the main park (similar to Magic Kingdom at Disney World).

    One of the debates I had before our visit was whether to take my motorized wheelchair that I usually use, or temporarily switch to a manual wheelchair that Richard would push. I prefer my motorized chair because it makes me independently mobile. However, if we have to get up a step or navigate a tight space, the manual chair is more flexible in that regard. Another concern for me was the effort Richard would expend on pushing me, in addition to the extensive amount of walking required for a Disney park. Since we learned in our research that the train to Disneyland Paris was accessible and that the paths of the park were also accessible, we decided to go with my motorized wheelchair because I would be more comfortable for the day.

    We traveled to Paris and enjoyed nine days of seeing the sights before spending our last day at Disneyland Paris. Because I was a little anxious about the train travel, we visited the station a couple days in advance to find out what we needed to do for travel. I was so glad we did because the operation was very different from my previous (and extensive) accessible train rides. We learned the easiest plan was to go early and visit the desk for help to purchase tickets, get an escort to the train, and have boarding assistance. The train staff helped me get on the train using a portable metal ramp from the platform at both ends of the trip. Otherwise, it was very easy and the ride was less than an hour from central Paris.
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    Author boarding train to Disneyland Paris in motorized wheelchair

    When we exited the train at the Marne-la-Vallée/Chessy station, we were expecting some walking to the park and were surprised when the gate was literally just outside! We went through the usual security and bag check before strolling along a path to the entrance building where you can visit guest services and purchase tickets.

    From the moment we began our approach, Disneyland Paris was beautiful and lush with plants and gentle theme music—and, of course, a gorgeous fountain! It took us a few minutes to find the right place to go for Guest Services in order to pick up the Disability Access Card, but once we did, the process was simple and straightforward. The cast member spoke English and we had no problem communicating that we were requesting the Disability Access Card and had a doctor’s letter to verify my disability and access needs. They completed a form then filled out a card that I would carry for the day. With the card, we also received a discount on our park tickets.

    After obtaining the Disability Access Card and purchasing our tickets, we were shown through a gate where they scanned our tickets and opened a wider door for my motorized wheelchair to pass. Then the real magic began!
    Planned similarly to the entrance of Magic Kingdom in Disney World, we arrived on Main Street and passed shops and eateries on our way to the gorgeous castle. This magical building not only seems bigger with all the towers, it has a scary resident in the dungeon accessible by path—a steam-blowing, growling dragon! After taking some photos of the castle exterior, we made our way to pay respects to the dragon. The pathway was fully accessible with only some trouble seeing in the dark. But once our eyes adjusted, there was plenty to see—and hear!
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    Author visiting the dragon under the castle
    Next, we entered Alice’s Curious Labyrinth, a walk-through shrubbery maze themed with Alice in Wonderland characters featuring the Red Queen’s castle with a spectacular view of the park. The maze was fully accessible for my wheelchair, though it was tricky turning back when we occasionally hit a dead end! Unfortunately, the castle didn’t have an elevator so I wasn’t able to get upstairs and see the full view. But Richard took some great photos, so I was able to see later. Outside the attraction, we saw Alice and the Mad Hatter walking about and the Red Queen at a meet and greet station. Another cool and different experience in this park was that more characters roam and do impromptu meets, so we saw a number of characters throughout the day.
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    Getting lost in the Red Queen's maze was fully wheelchair accessible
    As avid Small World fans, we had to see the Parisian version. Similar to Disney World, we waited for a special boat that could accommodate my wheelchair, so I was able to roll right on. The happiest ride on earth didn’t disappoint! The variations were so fun, yet it all felt familiar and aligned with the classic attraction. What was really cool was how bright the colors were and the updates in the animatronics.
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    The Small World attraction has a wheelchair accessible boat
    We spent some time walking through Fantasyland. Unfortunately, although I can ride Peter Pan at Disney World, when I inquired at this attraction, they would not let me try to board. It may have to do with the selections checked on the Disability Access Card, which is a useful tool but may have been too limiting for me as I can walk a few steps with assistance. We also were not able to ride the Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs attraction, likely for similar reasons.

    One of our must-do’s on any Disney World trip is a visit (or several) with Mickey! Parisian Mickey did not disappoint and the photos turned out great. We also met and chatted with Sleeping Beauty (Aurora) and the Prince (Phillip). They seemed to enjoy the chance to speak in English for few minutes as they were from the United Kingdom.
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    Princess Aurora, Kelly, Richard, and Prince Phillip
    Continuing the Parisian tradition of beautiful walks, we thoroughly enjoyed the Pirates' Beach area and took a lot of photos, including the skull cave and the pirate’s ship. Adventureland and Frontierland were also fantastic places to walk through. There was lots to see and enjoy from my wheelchair, although I was disappointed that Big Thunder Mountain was not accessible. I enjoy this ride in Disney World, but when we inquired, they said they were not running an accessible car. Typically, there is a car with a fold down seat that makes it possible for me to transfer onto this ride. Instead, we were able to take the steamboat and have a water tour of Frontierland, including viewing some of the amazing geysers on Big Thunder Mountain.
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    Hanging out at Pirates' Beach
    One of the attractions I was most looking forward to experiencing and had read about was the Phantom Manor. It has a different look and different story than Haunted Mansion in Disney World, but just as many grim grinning ghosts. The transfer was a little bit different in that the car did not have as much room, however we were able to make it work and even rode twice. It was a lot of fun to see the creative twists of this attraction!
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    View of the river and Phantom Manor
    After a delicious burger at the Lucky Nugget Saloon, where we enjoyed some live music and dancing, we made our way to Discoveryland. The area reminded me of a more fantastical version of Tomorrowland with Jules Verne-inspired design. We really enjoyed walking through the Nautilus and seeing some of the surprises of that underwater world. It was completely accessible with an elevator, but sometimes a little confined in maneuvering space.

    Unfortunately, as much as I love coasters, there was yet another I could not ride: Hyperspace Mountain. Richard blasted off and enjoyed the attraction, which is an updated version of Space Mountain. It’s much more thrilling and even goes upside down. But the seat wasn’t suited for transfer.

    Before leaving the area we would have liked to visit Mickey’s Philharmagic, but for some reason this attraction closes early in the evening, so we missed it. That will have to be on the list should we ever be able to plan a return visit!

    We had a magically full day at Disneyland Paris! Before riding off into the sunset on the train back to the city and a good night’s sleep, we went back through the castle to admire the stained glass and say our farewells to the dragon. I’m so glad we were able to make a visit to this park and get a taste of the international Disney experience.

    Overall, I would say that wheelchair users can definitely enjoy a visit to Disneyland Paris and have plenty to see and do. The most accessible areas were the walkable attractions and lands. Otherwise, transfers onto rides were a little hit and miss. Hopefully in the future, Disney will bring some of the accessibility of Disney World to this international park.

    For help planning your accessible trip to Disneyland Paris, see the information about accessibility on their website.
     
  • RaySharpton

    Retired and going to Disney.
    Joined
    Oct 28, 2000
    Post #432-Evacuating a Disney Attraction as a Wheelchair User Is Low Stress - By DIS Meaghan Lyndaker - Posted on May 15, 2019

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    As an adult living with a mobility disorder, a ride breakdown has the potential to ruin a day. Before my most recent trip, I had somehow managed to never experience it. However, as many people do, I always tried to plan an exit strategy. I was never quite sure what that would look like on a Disney attraction. What I didn’t know (and would have set my mind at ease) was how well prepared Disney was.
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    During our ride on The Seas With Nemo and Friends the attraction came to a complete stop. Claustrophobia immediately set in — the thought of being stuck on an attraction in my wheelchair while the ride was stopped was not something my mind was handling well. We stopped just after the portion of the ride where Crush says “Woah, jellies!” and I swear I still hear that phrase in my sleep! After about 10 minutes the lights came on and they began evacuating the attraction, starting with the people farthest from the exist first. A cast member came to the shell ride vehicle to meet my boyfriend and I, and told us they would manually open the wheelchair accessible clam shell once the other guests had cleared. It wasn’t until they attempted to pull the vehicle out and rotate it to deploy the ramp that we realized the ride had stopped in a location that was too narrow. My wheelchair is around 250 pounds and I am 100% non-ambulatory, so my anxiety started ramping up (forgive the pun) as I began playing through all the scenarios — all of which ended in us missing our lunch reservation at Restaurant Marrakesh! At this point there were now two cast members waiting with us and keeping me engaged in conversation — I’m sure panic was written on my face. It was only a minute or so later that they let us know help was on the way. In my past experience in similar situations, “on the way” can mean anything from 20 minutes to an hour, so I was bracing myself to be stuck for a while. In typical Disney form, they blew my expectations away; within 10 minutes a team from the fire department was at my side. They brought an emergency manual chair, and by the time my boyfriend had lifted me out of my electric wheelchair and into the one they brought with them the team had lifted my 250-pound chair off of the ride vehicle and safely onto the ground. My biggest anxiety through all of this was that my wheelchair — my primary mode of transportation — would get damaged, and my worries melted away as soon as it was wheels down! My boyfriend and I were both beyond thrilled with how quickly, smoothly, and safely the entire evacuation had panned out. By the time all was said and done we were given an Anytime FastPass+ and still made it across the park in time for our lunch reservations! All in all, the experience was extremely beneficial; it made my time on attractions for the rest of our trip much less stressful to know that if something were to go wrong, Disney was prepared to help us out.
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    After our stressful experience evacuating an attraction, it was a breath of fresh air to find the quiet little fountain toward the back of the Morocco pavilion.
     

    RaySharpton

    Retired and going to Disney.
    Joined
    Oct 28, 2000
    Post #433-My Decision to Rent an ECV from a Disney Featured Provider - By DIS Stefanie Hudzik - Posted on July 31, 2018

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    In addition to the lure of a magic-filled vacation, some families are drawn to the Walt Disney World Resort by the promise of accessibility and accommodation for their loved ones. I’ve been able to take my father to Walt Disney World twice, despite his long list of medical conditions — some of which do not allow him to walk long distances. Because of his mobility issues, an Electric Conveyance Vehicle (ECV) rental was inevitable. In this article, I wanted to share the reasons that lead me to rent an ECV from a third-party Disney Featured Provider (as opposed to renting an ECV through Disney directly). As I was planning the first trip with my father, I pondered the logistics of getting him around the massive Walt Disney World Resort. According to Walt Disney World’s website, an ECV can be rented at any theme park or water park, or at Disney Springs. However, I immediately noticed some information on the website that made me question whether a Disney ECV rental would work for us. Here are the issues I had:
    1. An ECV, once rented, cannot leave the location from which it was rented. For example, if you rent an ECV at the Magic Kingdom in the morning and later decide to visit Epcot, you must return the ECV at Magic Kingdom and get another ECV at Epcot. For us, that would mean that my father would have to walk to and from the busing, monorail, or boat locations when we park hopped or took a hotel break, which would be a lot of extra steps for him.
    2. The daily price for an ECV rental at a Disney park is $50, or $300 for a six-day vacation. When checking into renting third party, we found that we could do a six-day ECV rental for around $180.
    3. ECV rental at the parks is on a first-come, first-served basis (no advance reservations permitted). I’m sure they have a lot of ECVs available, but I felt uneasy not having a guarantee that my father could get an ECV for each day of our vacation.
    4. We were staying at Disney’s Caribbean Beach Resort for the trip. What would he do if our room was not near the food court and/or a bus stop? Or if he wanted to wander around the resort to admire the scenery at his leisure?
    For the reasons listed above, I decided to rent an ECV through a third-party vendor. Currently, there are four “Disney Featured Providers” for ECV rental listed on the Walt Disney World website. In my opinion, the best part about using a Disney Featured Provider for ECV rental is that you are able to pre-order your ECV and the provider will deliver it to the Disney resort hotel of your choice. This was paramount for us, as it would allow my father to have mobile freedom throughout his entire vacation, from the time we checked in until the time we checked out. Initially, I checked out each Disney Featured Provider’s website and called to ask questions and get a quote for our vacation dates. I learned that there is a wide variety of options available for ECV rentals (unlike the rentals available at the Disney theme parks). For example, we opted for a three-wheel design, in the hopes that it would be easy to maneuver through some of the tighter queues, with a "Captain’s chair" option for added comfort. While I appreciate that Disney has ECVs available for rent at the entrance to each theme park, my father simply would not be able to cover all the steps leading into and out of the parks as well as the sprawling grounds of our resort hotel. Moreover, the thought of potentially being denied a rental if they ran out of ECVs that day made me anxious. I loved knowing that we had a pre-ordered ECV that would be delivered to us and would cost us less money for the week, with no restrictions. But most importantly, I loved that my father, who doesn’t visit many places because of his health issues, could look forward to and enjoy his entire vacation through the promise of unlimited mobility.
     

    Lsdolphin

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Aug 3, 2013
    Can ECVs get on and off the skyway at the Rivera? Just asking because I heard the skyway does not actually come to a complete stop when coming thru the Rivera...
     

    RaySharpton

    Retired and going to Disney.
    Joined
    Oct 28, 2000
    Can ECVs get on and off the skyway at the Rivera? Just asking because I heard the skyway does not actually come to a complete stop when coming thru the Rivera...
    Yes, they can.

    It will look different than the other Skyliner stations because it is not an "end" station. The Riviera continues to the next end station that has a separate pull-off area.

    You can drive on and off with castmember's help.

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    mamabunny

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Oct 11, 2012
    Can ECVs get on and off the skyway at the Rivera? Just asking because I heard the skyway does not actually come to a complete stop when coming thru the Rivera...
    While my good friend @RaySharpton is correct, please know that because the line cannot be stopped at that particular station, you will have to attempt to back out of a moving cabin (if leaving the Skyliner there) or try to drive straight into a moving cabin (if joining the Skyliner there) - and that's if they allow It. I know that prior to the pandemic shutdown, it seemed to be hit and miss; we were told every time we rode through there that we could not disembark (even had a CM yell into my cabin "Stay put!" LOL) but there are plenty of stories around the internet of people who were allowed to both board and disembark with mobility devices while the cabins were moving through that station.

    Either way, that maneuver is not for the faint of heart; even as a very experienced mobility device user, with my own personal device that I am extremely accustomed to, and perfect conditions, I would not attempt it.

    People do it - I just feel that for safety's sake they should not allow it. *Maybe* manual wheelchairs that are pushed by another person, but even then, you are taking a risk (imagine trying to step backwards out of the People Mover at the Magic Kingdom, or trying to drive a bike into an open People Mover car - while it is in motion!).
     

    bluecruiser

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jan 1, 2008
    This sounds so unsafe! I just don't understand why Disney did this at the Riviera Skyliner station. Did they think that people using wheelchairs and ECV's would never stay at Riviera? This is a "deluxe" DVC resort (based on prices to buy in and how DVC has marketed it). I'd be plenty angry to own there and find out later I couldn't use the Skyliner station safely at my home resort. Because I'm sure Disney is not disclosing this information to potential purchasers.
     

    mamabunny

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Oct 11, 2012
    This sounds so unsafe! I just don't understand why Disney did this at the Riviera Skyliner station. Did they think that people using wheelchairs and ECV's would never stay at Riviera? This is a "deluxe" DVC resort (based on prices to buy in and how DVC has marketed it). I'd be plenty angry to own there and find out later I couldn't use the Skyliner station safely at my home resort. Because I'm sure Disney is not disclosing this information to potential purchasers.
    I don't know if Disney is voluntarily disclosing this information or not - but remember that right after Riviera opened, someone (dang, I can't remember who...) from our DIS family here stayed there, and (at that time) there were not even any accessible remotely-operated doors to the exterior other than the main lobby doors. All of the other ground-floor doors were not accessible; there were no working HA buttons.

    So... I want to give them the benefit of the doubt; I presume that whoever planned it said "Oh, they can get on/off at the nearest station, it's a short distance", but like you, I would never purchase DVC there, knowing that I could not access the Skyliner safely or easily from that location.
     

    RaySharpton

    Retired and going to Disney.
    Joined
    Oct 28, 2000
    bluecruiser posted a link showing that WDW is changing their bus seat group ones from six to eight zones.

    Here is a previous link to an orange seat bus with photos and explanations.

    Post #416 & post #417-WDW Bus Six Group Zone Seating Areas for the bus with Orange Seats after Re-Opening during COVID-19 - PHOTOS - from a friend - October 1, 2020.

    There are five different bus versions of the bus seats.

    Blue bus seats
    Orange bus seats
    Purple bus seats with steps to the rear of the bus.
    Purple bus seats with steps to the rear of the bus.
    Articulating bus seats.

    I'll try and take photos this December...God willing.

    Here is another link:

    Post #406 & post #407-WDW Bus Six Group Seating Areas for the bus with Purple Seats with steps to the rear of the bus after Re-Opening during COVID-19 - PHOTOS - from a friend - October 10, 2020.
     

    RaySharpton

    Retired and going to Disney.
    Joined
    Oct 28, 2000
    New Disney Bus Seating Arrangement Accommodates More Small Groups - PHOTOS - DFB Kelly Scott - October 17, 2020.

    When Disney World reopened, we got to experience the new bus loading and seating process — no more filling in every available spot or standing up and holding on to those hanging black handles! But, when we rode on one Disney bus today, we noticed some things have changed.
    Previously, the Disney busses we had ridden on generally had 6 zones. Typically, the bus driver directs each party to enter the bus through a specific entrance and sit in a particular zone depending on the size of their party. The overall goal is to have as few people as possible entering through the same set of doors and maintain some social distancing between guests while seated to the extent possible.
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    Disney buses with SIX zone seating and partitions
    But, with just 6 sections, some buses could be sent with very few guests. For example, if there were 6 unrelated parties with only one guest each, each guest would be directed to sit in a different zone and the bus would drive off with just those 6 passengers.
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    Disney buses with SIX zone seating and partitions
    Today, however, we hopped on a bus and found it had 10 zones! This new seating arrangement appears to allow for a greater amount of smaller parties to all sit in one bus.
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    New Disney Bus 10 Zone Seating Style
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    New Disney Bus 10 Zone Seating Style
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    New Disney Bus 10 Zone Seating Style
    Here’s a break-down of the seating zones in the bus we rode:
    • Zone 10: 4 seats available. Zone 10 is made up of those 5 seats along on the back row of the bus, but the center seat was unavailable.
    • Zone 9: 4 seats available. Zone 9 is made up of 5 seats on each side of the bus located across from each other, but 3 of the seats on each side were not available.
    • Zones 8, 7, 5, 2, and 1: 2 seats available in each
    • Zones 6, 4, and 3: 3 seats available in each
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    This is what the front of the WDW 10-Zone bus will look like.

    I guess since the previous zone numbering labels went from right to left, the two zone number one seats will stay the same.

    The old #2 zone could change since the old #3 zone changed to zone #6.

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    This other side has changed for the WDW bus with 10-Zones.

    ***********************************************************************************

    Updated with seat numbers on 10/19/2021.

    Here’s a break-down of the 10-seating zones.


    Zone #1 - 2 seats available (same 2-seat zone #1)

    Zone #2 - 2 seats available (was zone #1 opposite side of the bus aisle.)

    Zone #3 - 3 seats available & 0-if used by a mobilty scooter (was zone #2 fold-up seats)

    Zone #4 - 3 seats available (was zone #2)

    Zone #5 - 2 seats available (was zone #2)

    Zone #6 - 3 seats available & 0-if used by a mobilty scooter (was zone #3 fold-up seats)

    Zone #7 - 2 seats available in each (was zone #4 seats)

    Zone #8 - 2 seats available (was zone #4 seats)

    Zone #9 - 4 seats available. Zone 9 is made up of 5 seats on each side of the bus located across from each other, but 3 of the seats on each side were not available. (was zone #5 seats)

    Zone #10 - 4 seats available. Zone 10 is made up of those 5 seats along on the back row of the bus, but the center seat was unavailable. (was zone #6 seats)

    I asked DFB if she had photos of the front end of the bus with Zones 1, 2, 3, 4, & 5.

    Drivers side-
    Section 1 -2 seats and a barrier partition
    Section 4-3 seats (handicap) partition
    Section 6- 3 seats (handicap) partition
    Steps
    Section 7- 2 seats and a partition
    Section 9- 5 seats with only 4 available and a partition

    Back row- section 10 -5 seats with only 4 available, middle seat is not available.

    Passenger side/door side of the bus-
    Door
    Section 2- 2 seats and a partition
    Section 3 – 3 seats and a partition
    Section 5 – 2 seats
    Door
    Steps
    Section 8- 2 seats and a partition
    Section 9- 5 seats with only 4 available and a partition

    For loading, they put guests on a numbered marker, and half go to the back door/half to the front. Larger numbers enter first, so essentially it’s back to front.
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    When guests arrive at a WDW queue, a WDW cast merber or driver should make sure the guest stand on a ground marker with a number. (Some bus stops don't have queues with chains separating the rows of lines like CR & AKL, etc.)

    Half of the guests enter the bus rear side door.

    And of the guests enter the bus front side door.

    She said the larger number of guests enter first.

    She thinks the guests enter the bus rear side door (which has two zones with the most seats.
     
    Last edited:





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