Scooter falls off monorail ramp

Farro

It's a pasta! It's a grain! What?
Joined
Jun 19, 2016
I dare you to say that to someone's face.
I'm going to agree with the poster you quoted that scooter usage has increased exponentially at the parks, even over the past 15 years. And it is depressing that obesity is one of the biggest contributors to the need for scooters. Not saying they shouldn't be using them either. But there's nothing wrong with having concerns about the future health of our citizens, it's going to affect all of us in some way. :confused3

Obviously not everyone who uses a scooter falls into that category so please, no need to point out you don't fall into that group.
 

olwyngdh

DIS Veteran
Joined
Jun 25, 2010
I'm going to agree with the poster you quoted that scooter usage has increased exponentially at the parks, even over the past 15 years. And it is depressing that obesity is one of the biggest contributors to the need for scooters. Not saying they shouldn't be using them either. But there's nothing wrong with having concerns about the future health of our citizens, it's going to affect all of us in some way. :confused3

Obviously not everyone who uses a scooter falls into that category so please, no need to point out you don't fall into that group.
No one knows who falls into that group. There are a lot of invisible disabilities. Making an assumption based on how someone looks to you is the ultimate arrogance and it is something that people don't have the courage to say to someone's face although they will talk behind their back and often make sure they are overheard.
 

Farro

It's a pasta! It's a grain! What?
Joined
Jun 19, 2016
No one knows who falls into that group. There are a lot of invisible disabilities. Making an assumption based on how someone looks to you is the ultimate arrogance and it is something that people don't have the courage to say to someone's face although they will talk behind their back and often make sure they are overheard.
typed, re-typed, took a deep breath.

Have a great day! :)
 
  • Moliphino

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jun 29, 2016
    I'm going to agree with the poster you quoted that scooter usage has increased exponentially at the parks, even over the past 15 years. And it is depressing that obesity is one of the biggest contributors to the need for scooters. Not saying they shouldn't be using them either. But there's nothing wrong with having concerns about the future health of our citizens, it's going to affect all of us in some way. :confused3

    Obviously not everyone who uses a scooter falls into that category so please, no need to point out you don't fall into that group.
    We went to DLP last year and the complete lack of scooters there was so noticeable compared to what we're used to WDW.
     

    rg35

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jul 26, 2012
    No one knows who falls into that group. There are a lot of invisible disabilities. Making an assumption based on how someone looks to you is the ultimate arrogance and it is something that people don't have the courage to say to someone's face although they will talk behind their back and often make sure they are overheard.
    Sorry, but you have a clearly incorrect interpretation of what is being said. Nobody is talking about anyone's back or insulting people who need scooters. It's unfortunate when people's mobility gets to the point where they need one, no matter what the reason. But there is a big debate over whether or not scooters help or hurt their users because many health experts feel that they actually encourage further obesity. My grandmother used one for about the last 10 years of her life because she didn't want to work hard in rehab. Her quality of life was terrible being "stuck" in that thing all the time because her legs completely atrophied. So trust me I have very direct firsthand experience with an EMV user.


    So in summary yes, it is depressing to me to see their increased usage because it seems to signal a decline in the health of America. Having been to WDW many times since the 90's, including every year between 2013-2017, the increase is marked.
     

    serenitynow

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Mar 10, 2005
    Part of the reason for the increased usage is that the large baby boomer population is aging. Unfortunately, many physical issues rises as one ages. Another reason that there are more scooters at WDW is that many of the disabled guests used to be able to obtain a GAC (Guest Assistance Card) which helped with mobility and other issues. Under the new DAS system, many guests who used to quailfy for a GAC card are now being told that their disability needs can be met by renting a scooter and therefore they can no longer receive a DAS, which would allow them to get a return time for rides that have long lines and waits.

    As far as weight issues for those whose mobility has been impacted to the point where they need a wheelchair or ECV, weight management is an ongoing struggle for many people. When one is forced to become less physically active, the opportunity to maintain the same weight they had before their mobility became impaired is difficult. In addition, some of the medications used in the treatment of chronic conditions result in weight gain, such as Prednisone and other steroid drugs.

    You see, it’s very difficult to work out when trapped in a wheelchair. Not that is anyone else’s business. Nor is it anyone else’s business as to what physical ailment has caused a guest to need a ECV or wheelchair. It is very easy to judge others, but no one knows when they may find themselves in need of mobility assistance. Accidents, disease and other physical problems can render anyone at anytime forced to need a “scooter”.

    Therefore but for the grace of God ...
     
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  • smiths02

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Feb 13, 2009
    Each subsequent trip to WDW seems to be turning into more and more of an electric scooter convention. I get that there are elderly and some with disabilities that really need them, but far too many seem to be increasingly piloted by Americans who have just completely let their health go and simply can't get around. It's kind of depressing.
    Sorry, but you have a clearly incorrect interpretation of what is being said. Nobody is talking about anyone's back or insulting people who need scooters. It's unfortunate when people's mobility gets to the point where they need one, no matter what the reason. But there is a big debate over whether or not scooters help or hurt their users because many health experts feel that they actually encourage further obesity. My grandmother used one for about the last 10 years of her life because she didn't want to work hard in rehab. Her quality of life was terrible being "stuck" in that thing all the time because her legs completely atrophied. So trust me I have very direct firsthand experience with an EMV user.


    So in summary yes, it is depressing to me to see their increased usage because it seems to signal a decline in the health of America. Having been to WDW many times since the 90's, including every year between 2013-2017, the increase is marked.
    People who have "let their health go may and simply can't get around" do "really need" them. Having a health condition that impacts your mobility is the definition of needing a mobility device.

    My DH's grandmother is in her 90s. She has been pretty much stuck in her house for the last so many years (and for years before that just church). She pretty much refused to use any mobility device (will now use a cane). I would argue that her quality of life has suffered because she has been "stuck" in her house. I think being "stuck" in an ECV would be preferable.
     

    CMNJ

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Oct 8, 2014
    I have to agree the number of ECV has increased significantly over the years. The reasons could be many (including increased park attendance). My biggest problem with them is the idiots who don’t know how to drive them. In order to rent one you don’t have to take get any type of training or show any ability to use it properly in a incredibly crowded setting. MOST people are responsible with them but over the years I’ve encountered more than a few idiots like the drunk lady mentioned earlier. I especially wish Disney could somehow require any ECV that enters the parks to be equipped with some type of speed restricter (I’m sure that ADA regulations would probably prohibit that). When I see those idiots gunning their ECVs in the park I seriously want to scream. There are small children everywhere and that completely unacceptable. ECVs should not be traveling any faster than the average fast walker. It’s simply irresponsible in a busy theme park.
     

    afan

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Dec 30, 2014
    We went to DLP last year and the complete lack of scooters there was so noticeable compared to what we're used to WDW.
    Not only that but that lack of strollers both in the park and in Paris. Far more kids walking or being carried.

    Yeah DLP has people smoking everywhere instead!
    It was more smokey in actual Paris than the parks in May and even Paris wasn't that bad. Either we were lucky or it's not as bad as it used to be.
     
  • gdrj

    Boardwalk owner since 1999
    Joined
    Jan 13, 2012
    People who have "let their health go may and simply can't get around" do "really need" them. Having a health condition that impacts your mobility is the definition of needing a mobility device.

    My DH's grandmother is in her 90s. She has been pretty much stuck in her house for the last so many years (and for years before that just church). She pretty much refused to use any mobility device (will now use a cane). I would argue that her quality of life has suffered because she has been "stuck" in her house. I think being "stuck" in an ECV would be preferable.
    I can appreciate wanting her to have better mobility. My Mother when she was in her 80's had circulation issues, that caused leg pain if she went to the Mall. I would talk her into letting me rent a wheelchair, which she would reluctantly agree to. In NO way would I have encouraged or allowed her to use a ECV in a crowd of tens of 1000's at Disney World. She would have been a danger to herself and others.
     

    gdrj

    Boardwalk owner since 1999
    Joined
    Jan 13, 2012
    Wall-E-2.jpg
    I'm going to agree with the poster you quoted that scooter usage has increased exponentially at the parks, even over the past 15 years. And it is depressing that obesity is one of the biggest contributors to the need for scooters. Not saying they shouldn't be using them either. But there's nothing wrong with having concerns about the future health of our citizens, it's going to affect all of us in some way. :confused3

    Obviously not everyone who uses a scooter falls into that category so please, no need to point out you don't fall into that group.
    No one knows who falls into that group. There are a lot of invisible disabilities. Making an assumption based on how someone looks to you is the ultimate arrogance and it is something that people don't have the courage to say to someone's face although they will talk behind their back and often make sure they are overheard.
    Yes there are a number of disabilities that are invisible. Obesity is a national health crisis, it causes a number of other health issues and further debilitates an individual. We are becoming a Country where Wall-E is becoming a reality (myself included). I actually think there should be discussion of eliminating ECV's from the parks, or reducing the use of them, and using Wheelchairs more so. Obviously there are people who cant function without an ECV, but it is getting to the point where it will be unmanageable, from busses, to being rammed by people incapable of driving these things.
     

    LovePug

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Aug 27, 2004
    I once saw someone in a scooter accidentally drive up on a curb on Main Street and tip over in the middle of the road. You wouldn’t believe the outpouring of people who stopped and helped them up. It almost looked coordinated. That gave me some hope for people, seeing that
    I'm truly surprised this doesn't happen more often. Then curbs are difficult to see, especially at night.
     

    Someluck

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    Apr 7, 2015
    Yes there are a number of disabilities that are invisible. Obesity is a national health crisis, it causes a number of other health issues and further debilitates an individual. We are becoming a Country where Wall-E is becoming a reality (myself included). I actually think there should be discussion of eliminating ECV's from the parks, or reducing the use of them, and using Wheelchairs more so. Obviously there are people who cant function without an ECV, but it is getting to the point where it will be unmanageable, from busses, to being rammed by people incapable of driving these things.
    gdrj-I am wondering why would using wheelchairs more would be a solution to bus issues? Don't they still take up the same space on the bus as the ECV? We are 70 now and my spouse needs some assistance to be able to enjoy the parks but I don't have the strength any longer to push her in a wheel chair. It hurts her pride a bit, but an ECV is our solution to this problem. We try to be very considerate of others but without the EVC our days in the parks together would be over. We do really look forward to going for as long as we are still able. Until I started reading these threads, I had no idea how many people resented those who use ECVs.Fortunately, the people we encounter at the bus and the drivers who assist us are typically very kind. I am so sorry to hear it ruins so many others good times.
     
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    Moliphino

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jun 29, 2016
    gdrj-I am wondering why would using wheelchairs more would be a solution to bus issues? Don't they still take up the same space on the bus as the ECV? We are 70 now and my spouse needs some assistance to be able to enjoy the parks but I don't have the strength any longer to push her in a wheel chair. It hurts her pride a bit, but an ECV is our solution to this problem. We try to be very considerate of others but without the EVC our days in the parks together would be over. We do really look forward to going for as long as we are still able. Until I started reading these threads, I had no idea how many people resented those who use ECVs. Fortunately, the people we encounter at the bus and the drivers who assist us are typically very kind. I am so sorry to hear it ruins so many others good times.
    If people can transfer from the wheelchairs to bus seats, the wheelchair can be folded and not take up any space. It also takes less time to load in that situation.
     

    Rach3975

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    Sep 12, 2018
    Very scary--I hope the person involved is okay! I saw a scooter tip over on a trip to Colonial Williamsburg recently. There are lots of small hills there, and the ECVs don't handle them well.

    We try to be very considerate of others but without the EVC our days in the parks together would be over.
    I'm not bothered by ECVs, and I've been lucky enough not to see any of the situations people here have mentioned, like ECVs being driven recklessly around crowds. I think, though, that your comment here is exactly what matters. When you have a mobility limitation and are considerate of others, then there's no problem with using an ECV and you shouldn't feel bad about it!
     

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