March 2021 Cruises Heading Towards Cancellation

Intr3pid

DIS Veteran
Joined
Mar 2, 2018
That is what I think disrespectful of their guest time and Money! It is ridiculous that they would not be in constrain contact when they are holding our money. I guess they consider it their money now. After this next cruise that I have rebooked with them expecting the 125% I am thinking we may start exploring other options in cruising. Oh by the way when we rebooked with the increase for the same month and cruise in 2022 the room rate went up $500 making that 125% refund shrink to a 108% return.
They are holding on to your money only inside the last 60 days. I know that may be an issue for some, but most folks are in that last stretch for the 125% FCC. At that point, it's just a matter of who blinks first.
 

Cheburashka

Mouseketeer
Joined
Dec 25, 2020
They are holding on to your money only inside the last 60 days. I know that may be an issue for some, but most folks are in that last stretch for the 125% FCC.
That's a problem for people who are unsure of if their cruise will happen, and might be on the fence on whether to purchase airfare, which is typically nonrefundable. It's also a problem for people who don't have lots of spare cash, and whose vacation money is tied up in a cruise that might or might not happen during the only week they have available for vacation anytime soon.
 

Intr3pid

DIS Veteran
Joined
Mar 2, 2018
That's a problem for people who are unsure of if their cruise will happen, and might be on the fence on whether to purchase airfare, which is typically nonrefundable. It's also a problem for people who don't have lots of spare cash, and whose vacation money is tied up in a cruise that might or might not happen during the only week they have available for vacation anytime soon.
Yes, I agree it's a problem - if your circumstances changed greatly in the last stretch.

Let's say your cruise was going to sail on March 1. Your PIF date was Jan 1. Today is Jan 8. What changed in the last 7 days that's making you regret tying up your vacation money in this cruise? Did you think on Jan 1 your cruise was going to sail and now you don't?

If your personal or financial circumstances changed significantly in the last week, I get it. But, for vast majority, it's a waiting game, and I don't see a ton of good guys on either side.
 

leannak

DIS Veteran
Joined
Aug 28, 2011
We can’t cancel our March 1 cruise for a refund because our original cruise was a VGT. Our route for getting a refund is when DCL cancels it.
Are you looking forward to it being canceled or hoping against hope that it sails (provided you can get both rounds of the vaccine by then - I think you said that would be a requirement for you)?
 

bobbiwoz

I'm happy to dance with you!
Joined
Aug 26, 2003
Are you looking forward to it being canceled or hoping against hope that it sails (provided you can get both rounds of the vaccine by then - I think you said that would be a requirement for you)?
Yes, we are both 70+ and would want a vaccine to sail. We are in NJ, and I don’t see progress getting the vaccine to seniors. We did email the Governor giving our opinion of priority for seniors!
 

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  • DisneYE

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Oct 7, 2013
    Yes, we are both 70+ and would want a vaccine to sail. We are in NJ, and I don’t see progress getting the vaccine to seniors. We did email the Governor giving our opinion of priority for seniors!
    That's outrageous.
    Interesting you say NJ.
    Israel is almost a copy of NJ, in both size and population.
    In Israel they've already vaccinated 70% of 60+ year olds.
    WTH is going on in America with the slow rollout of the vaccines?
     

    Cheburashka

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    Dec 25, 2020
    WTH is going on in America with the slow rollout of the vaccines?
    In America we've slowed it down massively by separating people out into multiple groups. This is a noble idea but terrible in practice, because administrators of the vaccine don't want to get in trouble for vaccinating the "wrong" person before their turn, and are spending lots of time trying to find and schedule all of the "right" people in one group before moving on to the next group.

    This is why federal bailout money has gone out to almost everyone of a certain income level, regardless of personal circumstances (employment, savings, etc.). The time and money it would have required to sort out the "worthy" from the "non-worthy" recipients would have gummed up the process, so they just bypassed that and sent everyone under a certain income level a check/direct deposit.

    That is what should happen with vaccine distribution. There should only have been two very simple phases:

    Phase One, in which vaccines are administered in hospitals & other health care locations to all of their willing workers once (and if you don't show up for your shot that day, too bad, so sad, you can get in line with everyone else), and in which mobile units go into nursing homes to vaccinate all willing workers & residents there (& if you're not present that day, again, you'd have to get in line with everyone else later).

    Phase Two, in which everyone else has the opportunity to electronically sign up for a vaccine at major distribution centers (like city convention centers, megachurches, concert halls, etc.) that can handle a large volume of people, and if you don't show up on your vaccine day, too bad, get in line electronically again.

    That might sound "unfair", but it would get shots into arms much faster than the "let's evaluate which patients deserve to be in this round, make old-fashioned appointments with them individually, then give them more chances until it seems this group is finally finished". That is what is happening now and it's a very slow process. And meanwhile Covid is raging.

    There is a maxim, "the perfect should not be the enemy of the good". The ultimate goal of vaccination is herd immunity, and that will only happen once a large percentage of the population is vaccinated. And that day would come much faster if our government & health care providers stopped micromanaging the process, and just gave out the vaccine to all, first come, first served (via electronic sign-ups to avoid massive crowding).
     
    Last edited:

    FigmentSpark

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Apr 9, 2016
    In America we've slowed it down massively by separating people out into multiple groups. This is a noble idea but terrible in practice, because administrators of the vaccine don't want to get in trouble for vaccinating the "wrong" person before their turn, and are spending lots of time trying to find and schedule all of the "right" people in one group before moving on to the next group.

    This is why federal bailout money has gone out to almost everyone of a certain income level, regardless of personal circumstances (employment, savings, etc.). The time and money it would have required to sort out the "worthy" from the "non-worthy" recipients would have gummed up the process, so they just bypassed that and sent everyone under a certain income level a check/direct deposit.

    That is what should happen with vaccine distribution. There should only have been two very simple phases:

    Phase One, in which vaccines are administered in hospitals & other health care locations to all of their willing workers once (and if you don't show up for your shot that day, too bad, so sad, you can get in line with everyone else), and in which mobile units go into nursing homes to vaccinate all willing workers & residents there (& if you're not present that day, again, you'd have to get in line with everyone else later).

    Phase Two, in which everyone else has the opportunity to electronically sign up for a vaccine at major distribution centers (like city convention centers, etc.) that can handle a large volume of people, and if you don't show up on your vaccine day, too bad, get in line electronically again.

    That might sound "unfair", but it would get shots into arms much faster than the "let's evaluate which patients deserve to be in this round, make old-fashioned appointments with them individually, then give them more chances until it seems this group is finally finished". That is what is happening now and it's a very slow process. And meanwhile Covid is raging.

    As others have mentioned, "the perfect should not be the enemy of the good". The ultimate goal of vaccination is herd immunity, and that will only happen once a large percentage of the population is vaccinated. And that day would come much faster if our government & health care providers stopped micromanaging the process, and just gave out the vaccine to all, first come, first served (via electronic sign-ups to avoid massive crowding).
    This, I think, is pretty much what's going on in Canada, too. We've now innoculated .81% (that's not even 1%) of the population and used up just over half the doses the government received.
     

    AquaDame

    DCL
    Moderator
    Joined
    Jul 7, 2010
    WTH is going on in America with the slow rollout of the vaccines?
    Only certain people are eligible to get them currently. The healthcare workers who are first in line are actually tough to pin down from what I have been hearing. Even if they fully intend to be vaccinated on a certain day, they are getting called away to emergencies and then miss their shot. As it is only viable for a very brief period of time the dose then gets tossed AND we still have a person who has to go first that has not yet gotten it. An acquaintance who works in administration at a hospital in Washington had to reprimand someone who jumped the line regardless - they're being very strict about it. As a PP said I'd rather it go into ANY arm that wants it rather than be wasted.

    We also have a dearth of people who are able to give the vaccine. There is talk of using emergency measures to allow a greater number of people to give them, or maybe even calling in the national guard to help out. I think someone in power must agree... up until last week the only people I knew who had received it were nurses, but now I've had that aquaintance in administration, a friend who works part time at a needle exchange, and another friend who is doing her graduate work at another hospital here in Oregon is due to get hers next week. I asked my parents if they have heard anything yet (they're approaching 70 and I assume will get it before I do) but nothing. I guess the rest of us still need to wait.
     
  • Clojel

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    Mar 10, 2016
    Yes, we are both 70+ and would want a vaccine to sail. We are in NJ, and I don’t see progress getting the vaccine to seniors. We did email the Governor giving our opinion of priority for seniors!
    That's so unfortunate. I understand the logic behind vaccinating in "groups" but I don't understand why the 65+ community, across the board, hasn't been in the first phase of vaccinations. Hope that you are vaccinated and ready to sail as soon as cruises are up and running!! Best of luck and health to you!
     

    esta1701

    Earning My Ears
    Joined
    Feb 17, 2008
    Checked on my March 13th Western reservation on the Fantasy today and it is no longer showing on the site. Final payment was due at 11:59pm tonight. Entered the number and it could not be found.
     

    PKQ

    Earning My Ears
    Joined
    Jan 7, 2021
    Got the email this morning March is canceled. I am happy to apply the 125% to a future cruise. I wish they could have let us know sooner. I’ll take what I can get and look forward to cruising in 2022!
     





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