Guy who filmed himself climbing Big Thunder...security risk?

PuppyJonathan

DIS Veteran
Joined
Aug 13, 2013
It’s because he has a YouTube page and he gets traffic for his videos which almost all involve Disney.

I found his discovery island and wonders of life stuff kinda interesting (ethics aside, it’s obviously not smart) but this is kinda a bit much and doesn’t seem worth it in the slightest
That’s actually why I liked the other videos of those who’ve explored, they did it for the love of the project and then they never went back or tried to push themselves. Hoot and chief? were doing it to document horizons and even though they were the only ones I liked that kept going back they weren’t doing it illegally, the rush or for clickbait
 

drjackal31

Mouseketeer
Joined
Aug 9, 2016
I keep seeing that I was arrested video popping up on my youtube and I refuse to click on it. No interest in giving a person doing these things any attention.

I do watch Adam the Woo, but I think he has learned his lesson and has grown up quite a bit. Still a goofball though.
 

umichigan10

DIS Veteran
Joined
Jan 6, 2011
That’s actually why I liked the other videos of those who’ve explored, they did it for the love of the project and then they never went back or tried to push themselves. Hoot and chief? were doing it to document horizons and even though they were the only ones I liked that kept going back they weren’t doing it illegally, the rush or for clickbait
The guy who did this I think got arrested for sneaking into the boarded up disneyquest and he actually did an interview on the defunctland podcast which was kinda interesting. But definitely think this stunt was really really dumb
 
  • amberpi

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jul 13, 2012
    I do watch Adam the Woo, but I think he has learned his lesson and has grown up quite a bit. Still a goofball though.
    Adam the Woo eventually got his ban lifted and seems to have grown up a bit, but I did enjoy some of his videos a good bit.

    This kid is an idiot.
     

    PrincessWithABlaster

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jan 1, 2016
    I am in no way encouraging this behavior, but I found the actual video. As awful and idiotic this is what is also concerning is the comment section. Hundreds of comments passionately giving ideas for this imbecile to act again on different attractions and thanking him for his work. This world sometimes I just don’t know...
    Oy. That's … yeah. I don't really know what to say. More ideas is not what this guy needs.
     

    writerguyfl

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jul 5, 2015
    I'm not sure how a ban would even be enforced. Sure, they won't sell a ticket to someone with that name, address and email but since they don't require ID it would be easy for someone like this to buy a ticket with a new email and fake info. Obviously he's not a rule follower to begin with.

    Now if they keep the biometrics from the fingerprint scanner ... different story but I thought they have said that the biometrics are not stored for anything other than the current ticket.
    I would think Disney uses facial recognition software.
    I won't get into specifics, because I only have a tiny sliver of knowledge when it comes to Disney Security. And, I only know that stuff as it related to one of my previous Disney roles. But, I can say that the security you see at Disney World/Disneyland isn't the only security.

    Example: Back in 2015, Disney made news by posting a job opening for a "Global Intelligence Analyst Intern" in order to compile a threat assessments for "counterterrorism, physical threats, cyberattacks and all reputational risks" to the company. That wasn't the type of PR the company wanted, so the job quickly disappeared. But, I have no doubt that Disney still does those types of things. They just recruit for those positions in a less public arena.
    Source: https://www.newsweek.com/disney-looking-counterterrorism-intern-384347

    As for enforcing a ban, the biometrics isn't designed to accomplish that task. There are other systems and protocols to help identify those people.
     

    rteetz

    Rumors and News Moderator
    Moderator
    Joined
    Feb 20, 2013
    I won't get into specifics, because I only have a tiny sliver of knowledge when it comes to Disney Security. And, I only know that stuff as it related to one of my previous Disney roles. But, I can say that the security you see at Disney World/Disneyland isn't the only security.

    Example: Back in 2015, Disney made news by posting a job opening for a "Global Intelligence Analyst Intern" in order to compile a threat assessments for "counterterrorism, physical threats, cyberattacks and all reputational risks" to the company. That wasn't the type of PR the company wanted, so the job quickly disappeared. But, I have no doubt that Disney still does those types of things. They just recruit for those positions in a less public arena.
    Source: https://www.newsweek.com/disney-looking-counterterrorism-intern-384347

    As for enforcing a ban, the biometrics isn't designed to accomplish that task. There are other systems and protocols to help identify those people.
    Oh no doubt. Disney takes security very seriously. There are plenty of visible security, and under cover non-visible security all throughout the parks.
     
  • umichigan10

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jan 6, 2011
    Oh no doubt. Disney takes security very seriously. There are plenty of visible security, and under cover non-visible security all throughout the parks.
    An example of stuff they do that you don’t normally see: check out the entrance to backstage next time you’re entering the bus loop at AK. It’s like a military fortress
     
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    Jennasis

    DIS life goes on
    Joined
    Jun 11, 2000
    I was so mad that DH watched the video and gave that clown any additional views.
     

    ELLH

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    Jul 30, 2011
    A bit OT

    Given the popularity within the Disney community of some of this numbskull's ... ahem... "behind the scenes" videos, I'm surprised Disney hasn't taken the idea for their own and put out some videos like this themselves. Lots of subject matter options (anything from history to current behind the scenes) and who better than to tell the stories of "what was" than an Imagineer who worked on the project. Something as simple as 15-20 videos published to their site/YouTube/etc.

    Of course I get that it could lose some luster being 'authorized' but that's not my point. There's obviously a market for this kind of thing that Disney could tap in to. I mean, hey, when people started making unlicensed Disney-themed shirts they (eventually) caught on and began making and selling these same kind of shirts themselves.
     

    Krandor

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    Mar 26, 2014
    A bit OT

    Given the popularity within the Disney community of some of this numbskull's ... ahem... "behind the scenes" videos, I'm surprised Disney hasn't taken the idea for their own and put out some videos like this themselves. Lots of subject matter options (anything from history to current behind the scenes) and who better than to tell the stories of "what was" than an Imagineer who worked on the project. Something as simple as 15-20 videos published to their site/YouTube/etc.

    Of course I get that it could lose some luster being 'authorized' but that's not my point. There's obviously a market for this kind of thing that Disney could tap in to. I mean, hey, when people started making unlicensed Disney-themed shirts they (eventually) caught on and began making and selling these same kind of shirts themselves.
    Any authorized Disney video would get accused of hiding things and only showing what Disney wants you to see.
     
  • writerguyfl

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jul 5, 2015
    A bit OT

    Given the popularity within the Disney community of some of this numbskull's ... ahem... "behind the scenes" videos, I'm surprised Disney hasn't taken the idea for their own and put out some videos like this themselves. Lots of subject matter options (anything from history to current behind the scenes) and who better than to tell the stories of "what was" than an Imagineer who worked on the project. Something as simple as 15-20 videos published to their site/YouTube/etc.

    Of course I get that it could lose some luster being 'authorized' but that's not my point. There's obviously a market for this kind of thing that Disney could tap in to. I mean, hey, when people started making unlicensed Disney-themed shirts they (eventually) caught on and began making and selling these same kind of shirts themselves.
    While there might be a market, it isn't a profitable one for Disney. Whatever the yahoos who break the law earn via ads on YouTube is miniscule compared to the profits Disney makes every day.
     

    Geoff_M

    DIS Veteran, DVC Member, "Cum Hoc Ergo Propter Hoc
    Joined
    Sep 13, 2000
    Now if they keep the biometrics from the fingerprint scanner ... different story but I thought they have said that the biometrics are not stored for anything other than the current ticket.
    The biometric measurements taken at the gate are not unique to you. As I understand it, the fingerprint data point measurements are run through an formula that generates a number, say from 0 to 99 or 0 to 999, that then provides reasonable assurance that the ticket is mine if the number generated by the person at the gate matches the initial number stored on the ticket record from my first measurement. It's specific enough to to keep people from swapping tickets but not unique enough to create a potential privacy liability nightmare for Disney. As such, Disney wouldn't be able to use the gate biometrics as a means to flag banned persons, because (using my examples above) every 100th or 1,000th person's finger would also match the number of a banned person.
     

    ChipnDale79

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Aug 2, 2012
    This guy is going to hurt himself, get someone else hurt, or end up behind jail.

    What's he done in the past and this stunt are beyond stupid, he's pushing it way too far and will get caught again.

    I find behind the scenes stuff interesting, but i'm not going to give people the time of day that get the material illegally.
     

    Geoff_M

    DIS Veteran, DVC Member, "Cum Hoc Ergo Propter Hoc
    Joined
    Sep 13, 2000
    Adam the Woo eventually got his ban lifted and seems to have grown up a bit, but I did enjoy some of his videos a good bit.

    This kid is an idiot.
    I agree that this kid, Matt Sonswa, is an idiot even though I find his descriptions of his interactions with Disney Security staff to be pretty funny. I watched a recent video he make (off-site) where he recounts his troubled past with Disney and then hints that he's making new videos. In the last video I saw he made it sound like he's now using "helpers" to sneak backstage and grab the footage. The biggest problem with Sonswa is that he's totally reckless in his behavior. At The Wonders of Life, he opted to go backstage to the same places the very the next day after getting away with getting caught by CMs and successfully using the "I took a wrong turn and got lost" excuse. He got busted again, and then fled from the CM as they waited for Security. He then got busted and banned by Security after trying to enter Epcot a week later with flashlights and was recognized. The main appeal in his videos is that they basically are train wrecks waiting to happen. I also believe that his arrest and second "banning" at the DisneyQuest demolition site was also due to a quickly repeated entry stunt.

    I too will give Adam credit for turning over a new leaf with regard to respecting property rights. He now clearly toes the line when places are posted as "no trespassing" and even won't set foot on construction sites due to automatic legal restrictions and states as much in his videos. Several years after being banned by WDW (but not DL), he had to hire a lawyer in Florida for another issue and while he had him on a retainer, Adam asked him to appeal his WDW ban. He had the lawyer point to Adam's years-long "good behavior" in DL videos as well as his pledge to no longer try to go back stage at WDW. To his surprise, WDW agreed to drop the ban. I'll also give him credit for not being mad at Universal's ban of him and says that he completely understands their position. Though he still has the Universal backstage videos posted to his channel, they are several years old (and I'm sure much has changed with those areas since the taping), and he never explained how he got into the areas (though the suspicion is that a friendly Universal cast member was involved). Hopefully, Universal will have a similar change of heart, as did WDW, down the road.

    The Horizons team is also a whole different kettle of fish to me, and I think the video documentary utterly fascinating. They clearly state that the situation at Horizons was unique in the fact that the dark ride totally lacked all of the, pressure mats, light curtains, IR cameras, etc. that are standard today. They also show a place that is long gone and didn't go public with their work when it still stood, so it cannot breed copy cats.
     
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    DanBoris

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Aug 16, 2009
    The biometric measurements taken at the gate are not unique to you. As I understand it, the fingerprint data point measurements are run through an formula that generates a number, say from 0 to 99 or 0 to 999, that then provides reasonable assurance that the ticket is mine if the number generated by the person at the gate matches the initial number stored on the ticket record from my first measurement. It's specific enough to to keep people from swapping tickets but not unique enough to create a potential privacy liability nightmare for Disney. As such, Disney wouldn't be able to use the gate biometrics as a means to flag banned persons, because (using my examples above) every 100th or 1,000th person's finger would also match the number of a banned person.
    Depends on how many false matches there would be in a day. If the finger print did match someone who was banned, it could display a picture of the banned person to the CM for further verification. If there is reason to believe they are banned it would then get handed off to security.
     

    SgtTibbs

    RunDisney'er
    Joined
    Feb 11, 2014
    whats to say that someone with the intent to harm people couldn't do the same? To plant a device on a ride or queue, God forbid. It was just very surprising to me and got me thinking. It can't be that easy, right?
    Nothing. Not a thing. Your security primarily comes from the fact that people trying to kill you are less common than people who win mega jackpots.
     

    Geoff_M

    DIS Veteran, DVC Member, "Cum Hoc Ergo Propter Hoc
    Joined
    Sep 13, 2000
    Depends on how many false matches there would be in a day. If the finger print did match someone who was banned, it could display a picture of the banned person to the CM for further verification. If there is reason to believe they are banned it would then get handed off to security.
    True, but given that Disney has banned a number of people since opting for the finger scans and we don't know how large Disney's finger "check digit" scheme is for such scans it may be easy to trigger a false positive. If the range of possible formula values isn't large enough, they'd end up with lots of false positives to sort through at the gates because the "check digit" numbers for the population of banned people will vary just like it would in the general population. On top of that, since people usually enter the parks as part a group, you risk halting a whole family eager to get into park if only the "check digit" number of one member of the party happens to match someone that's banned. Given that the whole purpose of the finger system was geared around preventing people from sharing tickets, I personally doubt that it was designed to be robust enough to effectively weed out specific persons. A system that "only" offers a 99% chance of correctly matching your finger with your ticket would be more than sufficient to prevent ticket sharing.
     

    gottalovepluto

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jul 14, 2014
    I am in no way encouraging this behavior, but I found the actual video. As awful and idiotic this is what is also concerning is the comment section. Hundreds of comments passionately giving ideas for this imbecile to act again on different attractions and thanking him for his work. This world sometimes I just don’t know...
    Isn’t always though? Outside of the DIS ;)
     

    cmwade77

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jul 1, 2005
    People will do anything for their 15 minutes. :sad2:
    I really hope Disney is on this. Not only just to stop him but also to figure out what security holes he's using.
    They could offer to unban him in exchange for telling them how he did this and him agreeing not to do any further stunts like this.
     

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