Disney, Adoption and The Avengers...

Joined
Sep 25, 2000
This is an awful lot of outrage!

Who has this much time to whine about adoption in movies?


Some people have lost all touch with reality.
 

EMom

Comes from a long line of all fork ...
Joined
Jul 2, 2007
This is an awful lot of outrage!

Who has this much time to whine about adoption in movies?


Some people have lost all touch with reality.
As I see it, there has been an equal amount of "whining" from BOTH sides. The ones who believe they are entitled to declare what should and should not offend/upset adopted people (ironically coming from a lot of people whose lives have not been touched by adoption) have been just as vocal, as your post illustrates.
 

jenzem514

Earning My Ears
Joined
May 14, 2012
This is an offensive line. In fact, it seems to me that adoption is the one last thing people feel free to make fun of. Imagine if he had said, "Well, he's Hispanic." Or well, "he's gay." There would justifiably be outrage over it. Let's think about the children who will be seeing this -- the adopted ones will wonder what the joke is, and the kids they go to school with who know of the adoption may very well equate that with being a "bad thing." For whatever reason, that tendency to think adoption is something to be ashamed of is still there -- just the other day a girl at school said to my third grade son, "Well, at least I'm not adopted." Not saying she saw the movie, just saying that this kind of a comment in the movie reinforces a ridiculously negative stereotype that there's something wrong with being adopted. Just as there's nothing wrong with being from any race, creed or sexual orientation, there's nothing wrong with being adopted and the experience shouldn't be the butt of jokes. Disney, I'm ashamed of you and this is one movie i won't be taking my son to see. Maybe you should think of re-editing this and taking out the line.
 

eliza61

DIS Veteran
Joined
Jun 2, 2003
This is an offensive line. In fact, it seems to me that adoption is the one last thing people feel free to make fun of. :confused3." There would justifiably be outrage over it. Let's think about the children who will be seeing this -- the adopted ones will wonder what the joke is, and the kids they go to school with who know of the adoption may very well equate that with being a "bad thing." For whatever reason, that tendency to think adoption is something to be ashamed of is still there -- just the other day a girl at school said to my third grade son, "Well, at least I'm not adopted." Not saying she saw the movie, just saying that this kind of a comment in the movie reinforces a ridiculously negative stereotype that there's something wrong with being adopted. Just as there's nothing wrong with being from any race, creed or sexual orientation, there's nothing wrong with being adopted and the experience shouldn't be the butt of jokes. Disney, I'm ashamed of you and this is one movie i won't be taking my son to see. Maybe you should think of re-editing this and taking out the line.
Doubt that will happen especially since it's on it's way to making a billion bucks but I do encourage you to also write a letter. (lol, I'm a big fan of letting companies know why they are not getting my dough)

But that's just it, there are tons of shows on tv that make one liners about certain groups. Heck on Modern family last week when they were in Disney land, Jay said to Gloria "Don't go all latin on me". In reference to her being Columbian and the only reason why I watch 2 broke girls is because they are an equal opportunity offender. I'm black and I love Garrett Morris character because he's always playing up the "black slick dude" stereotype and I think the episode when they go to the Jewish deli and play up every single stereotype of Hassidic Jews should win an emmy.
I suppose we can go on ad nauseum about this in every movie.

I'm not a big fan of song of the south for it's stereotypes but I've come to take it in its context. thanks to many people here on this boards that gave me opinions on the movie.

Now I empathize if some found that line offensive but I love a good comedic line and I hope I'm never so sensitive that I don't realize that some "habits" that my folks have are simply downright hysterical. Chris rocks movie "good hair" is a brillant example of this.

I went to see Avengers again this weekend, my nieces and nephews took the family as a mother's day treat. Line was still funny. truthfully most of the folks laughing were adults. My 8 year old niece definitely didn't get it. so hopefully those who found it funny are old enough to not equate a joke with some thing being "bad".

But as I've said a few pages ago, I'm the first to admit I've use that line and had that line used on me. We tell my younger sibling (49yo) all the time "you really must have been adopted". He was never offended so he says.
 

JenM

DIS Veteran
Joined
Apr 23, 2007
I saw Avengers for the second time this weekend, and it's worth pointing out that during the first scene between Thor and Loki (before the now-infamous line, which once again got one of the biggest laughs of the movie), Thor starts their conversation by pointing out that "Our father..."

Which Loki immediately interrupts and says "No, your father..."

Loki then asks Thor if he'd learned the truth of their relationship, and Thor countered by pointing out that they'd grown up together, played together, fought wars together...in other words, that he still considered them brothers, regardless of "the truth". Which Loki immediately dimissed.

So Thor really isn't the one with the problem. All through the movie he tries to redeem Loki - to save his brother. Even after "the line", which truly was nothing more than a quick backtrack when Thor realized that he was maybe over-defending a mass-murderer.

And I still laughed at the line. It's funny. A guy on another forum I read pointed out that he's adopted and he laughed at that scene until soda came out of his nose. :laughing:
 
  • skater

    <font color=blue>Change sometimes stinks.. doesn't
    Joined
    Jul 11, 2005
    Doubt that will happen especially since it's on it's way to making a billion bucks but I do encourage you to also write a letter. (lol, I'm a big fan of letting companies know why they are not getting my dough)

    But that's just it, there are tons of shows on tv that make one liners about certain groups. Heck on Modern family last week when they were in Disney land, Jay said to Gloria "Don't go all latin on me". In reference to her being Columbian and the only reason why I watch 2 broke girls is because they are an equal opportunity offender. I'm black and I love Garrett Morris character because he's always playing up the "black slick dude" stereotype and I think the episode when they go to the Jewish deli and play up every single stereotype of Hassidic Jews should win an emmy.
    I suppose we can go on ad nauseum about this in every movie.

    I'm not a big fan of song of the south for it's stereotypes but I've come to take it in its context. thanks to many people here on this boards that gave me opinions on the movie.

    Now I empathize if some found that line offensive but I love a good comedic line and I hope I'm never so sensitive that I don't realize that some "habits" that my folks have are simply downright hysterical. Chris rocks movie "good hair" is a brillant example of this.

    I went to see Avengers again this weekend, my nieces and nephews took the family as a mother's day treat. Line was still funny. truthfully most of the folks laughing were adults. My 8 year old niece definitely didn't get it. so hopefully those who found it funny are old enough to not equate a joke with some thing being "bad".

    But as I've said a few pages ago, I'm the first to admit I've use that line and had that line used on me. We tell my younger sibling (49yo) all the time "you really must have been adopted". He was never offended so he says.

    Good post. I took my kids to see it last week. I have to admit the line wasn't as bad as I thought it would be. That will teach me to get passionate about a movie I haven't seen :rolleyes1.

    I still have a few misgivings about the line and empathize with others who might be more upset. I'm also glad I spoke with my boys about it before they saw it.

    If my DD said something like that in referring to one of her brothers, I would be upset with her. Still, it is a movie and its silly. It also shows a little of human nature - sometimes we distance ourselves from someone's embarrassing behavior - in whatever way we can!
     

    DizBelle

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Sep 10, 2003
    But, the movie director chose not to say that he takes after the other side of the family. He chose to make a nasty and cruel comment that implied awful behaviors are done by adopted children. They should be ashamed.
    It was a line by a character. The directory didn't come on screen and say "I think anyone that is adopted is bad." Thor (the character) says the line in reference to 1 adopted kid - Loki. Why does everything think it's a blanket statement about all adoptees? If every line in every movie regarding every situation was all "happy, happy, joy, joy, sensitive flowers and rainbows", the movies would be pretty boring.

    Why is no one upset that the director put a mass murder in the movie? I think that murdering 80 people is way more offensive than stating that someone is adopted.
     

    DizBelle

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Sep 10, 2003
    This is an offensive line. In fact, it seems to me that adoption is the one last thing people feel free to make fun of. Imagine if he had said, "Well, he's Hispanic." Or well, "he's gay." There would justifiably be outrage over it. Let's think about the children who will be seeing this -- the adopted ones will wonder what the joke is, and the kids they go to school with who know of the adoption may very well equate that with being a "bad thing." For whatever reason, that tendency to think adoption is something to be ashamed of is still there -- just the other day a girl at school said to my third grade son, "Well, at least I'm not adopted." Not saying she saw the movie, just saying that this kind of a comment in the movie reinforces a ridiculously negative stereotype that there's something wrong with being adopted. Just as there's nothing wrong with being from any race, creed or sexual orientation, there's nothing wrong with being adopted and the experience shouldn't be the butt of jokes. Disney, I'm ashamed of you and this is one movie i won't be taking my son to see. Maybe you should think of re-editing this and taking out the line.

    Your son is in third grade and the movie is rated PG-13. He shouldn't be seeing it without you present since some of the material may be inappropriate for a child his age.

    It seems that 7-8 years old is way too young for a PG-13 movie regardless.
     

    BroganMc

    It's not the age, it's the mileage
    Joined
    Feb 12, 2005
    Always amazes me what people will take offense to.

    The line was funny because it's true. Loki is the product of a violent race stolen as a baby to be raised by the Asgaard as Thor's brother. His nature is to be evil. Thor was also running on the bad side in the movie Thor until his father banished him to Earth and he developed his softer Asgaard side. Loki, despite having all the advantages of a nurturing family, chose to follow his evil side. That presumably cost him his life in Thor. In the Avengers, he returns to unleash his evil on Earth as revenge.

    It's a classic story trope from ancient mythology. The good brother vs evil brother. They could have just had different mothers. It has nothing to do with adoption. It's all about explaining why two brothers could grow up to be such different men.

    Plus the Asgaards tend to be arrogant sods. Thor needed a setdown to keep him in check. Learning that his brother was a mass murderer who threatened the very people he loved (the humans who redeemed him) put him on the defensive.
     
  • Lintasare

    Holy Carp!
    Joined
    Jul 16, 2007
    Always amazes me what people will take offense to.

    The line was funny because it's true. Loki is the product of a violent race stolen as a baby to be raised by the Asgaard as Thor's brother. His nature is to be evil. Thor was also running on the bad side in the movie Thor until his father banished him to Earth and he developed his softer Asgaard side. Loki, despite having all the advantages of a nurturing family, chose to follow his evil side. That presumably cost him his life in Thor. In the Avengers, he returns to unleash his evil on Earth as revenge.

    It's a classic story trope from ancient mythology. The good brother vs evil brother. They could have just had different mothers. It has nothing to do with adoption. It's all about explaining why two brothers could grow up to be such different men.

    Plus the Asgaards tend to be arrogant sods. Thor needed a setdown to keep him in check. Learning that his brother was a mass murderer who threatened the very people he loved (the humans who redeemed him) put him on the defensive.
    BINGO!!!!

    You said it perfectly.

    Someone give this poster a cookie.
     

    SaraJayne

    <font color=red>Stop moving those smilies! <img sr
    Joined
    Mar 6, 2009
    Always amazes me what people will take offense to.

    The line was funny because it's true. Loki is the product of a violent race stolen as a baby to be raised by the Asgaard as Thor's brother. His nature is to be evil. Thor was also running on the bad side in the movie Thor until his father banished him to Earth and he developed his softer Asgaard side. Loki, despite having all the advantages of a nurturing family, chose to follow his evil side. That presumably cost him his life in Thor. In the Avengers, he returns to unleash his evil on Earth as revenge.

    It's a classic story trope from ancient mythology. The good brother vs evil brother. They could have just had different mothers. It has nothing to do with adoption. It's all about explaining why two brothers could grow up to be such different men.

    Plus the Asgaards tend to be arrogant sods. Thor needed a setdown to keep him in check. Learning that his brother was a mass murderer who threatened the very people he loved (the humans who redeemed him) put him on the defensive.
    That's just crazy talk. ;)
     

    EMom

    Comes from a long line of all fork ...
    Joined
    Jul 2, 2007
    Always amazes me what people will take offense to.

    The line was funny because it's true. Loki is the product of a violent race stolen as a baby to be raised by the Asgaard as Thor's brother. His nature is to be evil. Thor was also running on the bad side in the movie Thor until his father banished him to Earth and he developed his softer Asgaard side. Loki, despite having all the advantages of a nurturing family, chose to follow his evil side. That presumably cost him his life in Thor. In the Avengers, he returns to unleash his evil on Earth as revenge.

    It's a classic story trope from ancient mythology. The good brother vs evil brother. They could have just had different mothers. It has nothing to do with adoption. It's all about explaining why two brothers could grow up to be such different men.

    Plus the Asgaards tend to be arrogant sods. Thor needed a setdown to keep him in check. Learning that his brother was a mass murderer who threatened the very people he loved (the humans who redeemed him) put him on the defensive.
    I disagree. Not with your synopsis, but with your conclusion. The back story may have little to do with adoption and be more about inherited traits, but the JOKE was completely about adoption. Otherwise, the words, "He's ADOPTED," would not have been used. The script could have read, "He's (whatever race he is)," but THAT would not have gotten a laugh. Maybe a few chuckles.

    The crowd laughed because of the word...ADOPTED. It got a big laugh because most people, IMHO, are not even aware that they are guilty of buying into the stereotypes and prejudices regarding adoption and adoptees. These so pervade our culture that we take them as a given. And we should not.

    The joke and the laugh were all about adoption. Referencing Loki's evil nature in another manner would not have gotten the reaction that "He's adopted" did. And that says just as much about the audience as it does about the writer. He simply knew the crowd he was playing to. Predictable.

    People already knew Loki's story. That didn't make them laugh. It took the word "adopted" to do that.
     

    FlightlessDuck

    Y kant Donald fly?
    Joined
    Jun 20, 2006
    Joss Whedon also makes fun of or in some way dislikes cheerleaders, vampires, sociopathic adolescent boys that wear black and blow up Combat Carl figures, evil anthropomorphic horses, hussies, jocks, nerds, fools, and virgins.
     

    LuvsDragonflies

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Apr 14, 2011
    Joss Whedon also makes fun of or in some way dislikes cheerleaders, vampires, sociopathic adolescent boys that wear black and blow up Combat Carl figures, evil anthropomorphic horses, hussies, jocks, nerds, fools, and virgins.
    Wait just a cotton pickin' minute here...evil anthropomorphic horses are people too. So just you WATCH IT!:furious:
     

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