Disney, Adoption and The Avengers...

Doug7856

DIS Veteran
Joined
Sep 29, 2003
I took my son to see The Avengers on Saturday. In one key scene, as the Avengers are assembled they review the evil committed by Loki. Thor confronts the rest of the Avengers because Loki is his brother. When the Avengers list the atrocities he has committed, Thor volunteers that “Loki was adopted”. It got quite a laugh from the audience, yet it implies that an adopted sibling is less family than biological children.

Children don’t need to be told they are inferior or defective or less of a family member because they were adopted, especially from someone as trusted as the Walt Disney Company. There are 73.8 million children who are a part of families created through adoption. It’s odd that Disney would choose to send a message that adopted children are less part of a family than biological children, but in my opinion, that’s exactly what happens in The Avengers.

The movie was excellent and I don’t regret taking my son to see it. I just thought we had moved beyond these stereotypes about adoption.

This is my point of view as the father of adopted children.

Did this scene bother anyone else?
 

Shyvioletisme

<font color=green>So I have a doppleganger running
Joined
Sep 28, 2005
I took my son to see The Avengers on Saturday. In one key scene, as the Avengers are assembled they review the evil committed by Loki. Thor confronts the rest of the Avengers because Loki is his brother. When the Avengers list the atrocities he has committed, Thor volunteers that “Loki was adopted”. It got quite a laugh from the audience, yet it implies that an adopted sibling is less family than biological children.

Children don’t need to be told they are inferior or defective or less of a family member because they were adopted, especially from someone as trusted as the Walt Disney Company. There are 73.8 million children who are a part of families created through adoption. It’s odd that Disney would choose to send a message that adopted children are less part of a family than biological children, but in my opinion, that’s exactly what happens in The Avengers.

The movie was excellent and I don’t regret taking my son to see it. I just thought we had moved beyond these stereotypes about adoption.

This is my point of view as the father of adopted children.

Did this scene bother anyone else?
You're reading too much into it.
 

alex9179

DIS Veteran
Joined
Aug 17, 2010
This is a subject that rears up regularly on the adoption board I frequent. The parents are very sensitive to adoption references and there are plenty of "this sends the wrong message" opinions.

Personally, I feel that my own opinions or worries influence how I perceive a situation. Sometimes I read more into it because of my past experiences. As far as adoption, I guess I don't pay as much attention unless someone is making an effort to be insulting...which has never happened to me. I have some relatives who, I feel, see me as a long term babysitter :rolleyes: I'm sure that's not quite what they think, though!

You have your perceptions. I'm not going to try to say you misinterpreted it since I wasn't there and haven't seen the movie yet. However, I tend to doubt people were laughing at the notion of adoption.
 
  • stsomewhere

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Mar 13, 2008
    My son tells his sister all the time that she is adopted because he does not want to be related to her. You can definitively see the resemblance.
     

    LilyWDW

    Going to My Happy Place
    Joined
    May 7, 2006
    I took my son to see The Avengers on Saturday. In one key scene, as the Avengers are assembled they review the evil committed by Loki. Thor confronts the rest of the Avengers because Loki is his brother. When the Avengers list the atrocities he has committed, Thor volunteers that “Loki was adopted”. It got quite a laugh from the audience, yet it implies that an adopted sibling is less family than biological children.

    Children don’t need to be told they are inferior or defective or less of a family member because they were adopted, especially from someone as trusted as the Walt Disney Company. There are 73.8 million children who are a part of families created through adoption. It’s odd that Disney would choose to send a message that adopted children are less part of a family than biological children, but in my opinion, that’s exactly what happens in The Avengers.

    The movie was excellent and I don’t regret taking my son to see it. I just thought we had moved beyond these stereotypes about adoption.

    This is my point of view as the father of adopted children.

    Did this scene bother anyone else?
    You are reading way too much into that comment.

    Have you seen the Thor movie itself? If you have, then you would have a better understanding of the comment.
     

    Jennasis

    DIS life goes on
    Joined
    Jun 11, 2000
    Grasping at straws.

    The discussion between the characters was about how dangerous the ASGARDIANS as a whole are, as evidenced by the atrocities of Loki. To which Thor defends the honor of the rest of Asgard by joking "he's adopted" meaning, Asgardians are not evil violent people.

    You know that evil people can be adopted too right?
     

    diznygirl

    <font color=701e72>I have a symmetry thing<br><fon
    Joined
    Aug 14, 2004
    There's a lot more going on to be offended about.
     
  • Kim&Chris

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Mar 23, 2000
    I took my son to see The Avengers on Saturday. In one key scene, as the Avengers are assembled they review the evil committed by Loki. Thor confronts the rest of the Avengers because Loki is his brother. When the Avengers list the atrocities he has committed, Thor volunteers that “Loki was adopted”. It got quite a laugh from the audience, yet it implies that an adopted sibling is less family than biological children.

    Children don’t need to be told they are inferior or defective or less of a family member because they were adopted, especially from someone as trusted as the Walt Disney Company. There are 73.8 million children who are a part of families created through adoption. It’s odd that Disney would choose to send a message that adopted children are less part of a family than biological children, but in my opinion, that’s exactly what happens in The Avengers.

    The movie was excellent and I don’t regret taking my son to see it. I just thought we had moved beyond these stereotypes about adoption.

    This is my point of view as the father of adopted children.

    Did this scene bother anyone else?
    I think you may be reading too much into it. Did you see Thor? If not, you may want to take a look, so you'd better understand the comment made by Thor regarding Loki's situation.
     

    Doug7856

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Sep 29, 2003
    I did see both The Avengers and Thor. both very good movies. In "Thor" there was not a connection to Loki's actions and his adoption. I have no problem with that presentation.

    I do have a problem with adoption presented as the reason: "Loki's adopted". It's a reason for the evil aspect of the character. It's the thought that "He's not really my brother, he's adopted" that I object to. Families created through adoption are no less family.

    Your comments are appreciate and no doubt I'm sensitive to how adoption is presented to my children and the cultural acceptance of adoption in general.
     

    Jennasis

    DIS life goes on
    Joined
    Jun 11, 2000
    I did see both The Avengers and Thor. both very good movies. In "Thor" there was not a connection to Loki's actions and his adoption. I have no problem with that presentation.

    I do have a problem with adoption presented as the reason: "Loki's adopted". It's a reason for the evil aspect of the character. It's the thought that "He's not really my brother, he's adopted" that I object to. Families created through adoption are no less family.

    Your comments are appreciate and no doubt I'm sensitive to how adoption is presented to my children and the cultural acceptance of adoption in general.
    Then you patently misunderstood the dialogue. Sorry. No controversy here. He was not painted as being evil because he was adopted. His adoption is mentioned to counter the accusation that all people from Asgard are dangerous, violent and evil, like Loki. BTW, Loki's IS actually a member of a violent and dangerous race. Looks like, IN THIS FICTITIOUS WORLD, nature wins out over nurture.
     

    alex9179

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Aug 17, 2010
    I did see both The Avengers and Thor. both very good movies. In "Thor" there was not a connection to Loki's actions and his adoption. I have no problem with that presentation.

    I do have a problem with adoption presented as the reason: "Loki's adopted". It's a reason for the evil aspect of the character. It's the thought that "He's not really my brother, he's adopted" that I object to. Families created through adoption are no less family.

    Your comments are appreciate and no doubt I'm sensitive to how adoption is presented to my children and the cultural acceptance of adoption in general.
    I don't agree with your conclusion that the fact he's adopted is presented as the reason for his evil nature. As the poster pointed out, the characters were stereotyping the Asgardians based on the behavior of one person. It was then pointed out that he was not, in fact, a product of that line. Also, Thor continued to be bonded to his brother despite betrayal (in "Thor"). The bonds of family were still held dear to him, whether it was blood or not. His love was constant, but he was held accountable to his duty to prevent his brother from causing harm.
     
  • Jennasis

    DIS life goes on
    Joined
    Jun 11, 2000
    I don't agree with your conclusion that the fact he's adopted is presented as the reason for his evil nature. As the poster pointed out, the characters were stereotyping the Asgardians based on the behavior of one person. It was then pointed out that he was not, in fact, a product of that line. Also, Thor continued to be bonded to his brother despite betrayal (in "Thor"). The bonds of family were still held dear to him, whether it was blood or not. His love was constant, but he was held accountable to his duty to prevent his brother from causing harm.
    :thumbsup2
     

    Doug7856

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Sep 29, 2003
    I don't agree with your conclusion that the fact he's adopted is presented as the reason for his evil nature. As the poster pointed out, the characters were stereotyping the Asgardians based on the behavior of one person. It was then pointed out that he was not, in fact, a product of that line. Also, Thor continued to be bonded to his brother despite betrayal (in "Thor"). The bonds of family were still held dear to him, whether it was blood or not. His love was constant, but he was held accountable to his duty to prevent his brother from causing harm.
    I see your point of view and prefer your interpretation.
     

    Bluestars

    Smile and let the world wonder
    Joined
    Oct 26, 2007
    I saw the movie and thought the joke was funny. However, while I was laughing it did cross my mind that some adopted children or their parents might not find it funny.
     

    CentralFloridian99

    The guy who will ask all the celebrities if they w
    Joined
    Jun 23, 2011
    The whole theater laughed at that scene, I just chuckled. I think Thor was just putting that out to the Avengers, but I can see why it could bother parents.
     

    LilyWDW

    Going to My Happy Place
    Joined
    May 7, 2006
    I did see both The Avengers and Thor. both very good movies. In "Thor" there was not a connection to Loki's actions and his adoption. I have no problem with that presentation.

    I do have a problem with adoption presented as the reason: "Loki's adopted". It's a reason for the evil aspect of the character. It's the thought that "He's not really my brother, he's adopted" that I object to. Families created through adoption are no less family.

    Your comments are appreciate and no doubt I'm sensitive to how adoption is presented to my children and the cultural acceptance of adoption in general.
    There was very much a connection in his decisions and the fact he was not actually from Asgard. It had a huge impact in what happened in Thor. It is very important to note that he is NOT the same race as Thor and the others.
     

    lemondog

    <font color=darkorchid>My twins fight over who too
    Joined
    Oct 5, 2004
    YES! I am an adoptive parent and it did bother me. Not enough to get me in a huff and boycott the movie or anything, but it did bug me and I didn't find it nearly as funny as everyone else. I am VERY glad my 10yo (adopted) did not come with me to the movie as I know it would have upset her.

    And yes, I did see Thor so I understand the connection.
     

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