The Running Thread - 2019

MissLiss279

DIS Veteran
Joined
Jul 10, 2015
A couple weeks back I asked for recommendations for favorite half marathons in each state for a 50 state challenge. Of course I got busy and never went through all the responses but alas, here it is including a few multi state challenges to get several states at a time. I’ll add to and update this list going forward for anyone else who might be interested.

50 States Half Marathons

Alabama: Mercedes, Rocket City
Alaska:
Arizona:
Arkansas:
California:
Colorado: Colfax Half, Colorado Half
Connecticut:
Delaware:
Florida: Space Coast, DISNEY
Georgia: Tear Drop Half, Rock n Roll Savannah
Hawaii:
Idaho:
Illinois:
Indiana: Indianapolis Mini Marathon
Iowa:
Kansas: Bill Snyder Half, Garmin
Kentucky: Run the Bluegrass
Louisiana: Rock n Roll New Orleans
Maine: Old Port Half
Maryland: Frederick Half
Massachusetts: Plymouth Race to the Rock
Michigan: North Country Trail 13.1, Freep Detroit Press, Dexter to Ann Arbor Half, Sleepy Hollow Half
Minnesota:
Mississippi: Mississippi Blues
Missouri:
Montana:
Nebraska: Good Life Halfsy
Nevada:
New Hampshire: Smuttynose
New Jersey:
New Mexico:
New York:
North Carolina: Asheville
North Dakota: Fargo
Ohio: Flying Pig
Oklahoma: Route 66, OKC Memorial
Oregon:
Pennsylvania: Philly Half
Rhode Island:
South Carolina: Kiawah Island, Charleston Half
South Dakota:
Tennessee: Rock n Roll Nashville
Texas: Shiner Half, Tour de Fleurs, Alamo Half
Utah: Salt Lake City Half, Zion Half, Jupiter Peak Steeplechase
Vermont:
Virginia: Richmond Half, Shamrock Half
Washington:
West Virginia:
Wisconsin: Brewers Mini Marathon
Wyoming:

Ottawa: Tamarack Race Weekend, Courses Gourmandes Series

Multi State Challenges:
Bear Lake Trifecta-Idaho, Wyoming, Utah
I-35 Challenge-Kansas, Iowa
New England Challenge-Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island
Alaska: I really liked the Anchorage Marathon, I’m sure the half is good too.
Arkansas: Little Rock Marathon is known for their giant medals. They have a half as well. (I haven’t ran this one, but it gets good reviews.)
Iowa: Des Moines - This is the 2nd part of the I-35 challenge. I haven’t done it.
Missouri: Hospital Hill and Kansas City usually have good reviews (KC is part of the I-35 challenge)
Montana: Missoula has good reviews. I’ve ran the Bozeman marathon (and I would run it again). It’s very scenic. But not a whole lot of anything at the end of the race, and part of the marathon course is on a decently busy highway that isn’t closed off. There’s also the Yellowstone Half Marathon by Vacation Races is West Yellowstone. I think its on a lot of trail - like 4-wheeler/snowmobile trail. I haven’t done this one.
Oregon: I ran the Columbia Gorge Marathon last year. Very pretty with all the fall colors. There is a half as well.
Wyoming: Jackson Hole Marathon/Half - I liked the full, except there was one section that was on a bike trail that was pretty banked for a few miles - my knee did not like that. That was a few years ago, and I’m not sure if the half was on that section or not.

Just a note: you have Kansas listed as part of the I-35 challenge, but it is actually Missouri with the Kansas City Marathon/Half.
 
  • PrincessMickey

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jan 27, 2009
    Alaska: I really liked the Anchorage Marathon, I’m sure the half is good too.
    Arkansas: Little Rock Marathon is known for their giant medals. They have a half as well. (I haven’t ran this one, but it gets good reviews.)
    Iowa: Des Moines - This is the 2nd part of the I-35 challenge. I haven’t done it.
    Missouri: Hospital Hill and Kansas City usually have good reviews (KC is part of the I-35 challenge)
    Montana: Missoula has good reviews. I’ve ran the Bozeman marathon (and I would run it again). It’s very scenic. But not a whole lot of anything at the end of the race, and part of the marathon course is on a decently busy highway that isn’t closed off. There’s also the Yellowstone Half Marathon by Vacation Races is West Yellowstone. I think its on a lot of trail - like 4-wheeler/snowmobile trail. I haven’t done this one.
    Oregon: I ran the Columbia Gorge Marathon last year. Very pretty with all the fall colors. There is a half as well.
    Wyoming: Jackson Hole Marathon/Half - I liked the full, except there was one section that was on a bike trail that was pretty banked for a few miles - my knee did not like that. That was a few years ago, and I’m not sure if the half was on that section or not.

    Just a note: you have Kansas listed as part of the I-35 challenge, but it is actually Missouri with the Kansas City Marathon/Half.
    Thanks!!! I fixed it and added yours.


    50 States Half Marathons

    Alabama: Mercedes, Rocket City
    Alaska: Anchorage
    Arizona:
    Arkansas: Little Rock
    California:
    Colorado: Colfax Half, Colorado Half
    Connecticut:
    Delaware:
    Florida: Space Coast, DISNEY
    Georgia: Tear Drop Half, Rock n Roll Savannah
    Hawaii:
    Idaho:
    Illinois:
    Indiana: Indianapolis Mini Marathon
    Iowa: Des Moines
    Kansas: Bill Snyder Half, Garmin
    Kentucky: Run the Bluegrass
    Louisiana: Rock n Roll New Orleans
    Maine: Old Port Half
    Maryland: Frederick Half
    Massachusetts: Plymouth Race to the Rock
    Michigan: North Country Trail 13.1, Freep Detroit Press, Dexter to Ann Arbor Half, Sleepy Hollow Half
    Minnesota:
    Mississippi: Mississippi Blues
    Missouri: Hospital Hill, Kansas City
    Montana: Missoula, Bozeman, Yellowstone Half
    Nebraska: Good Life Halfsy
    Nevada:
    New Hampshire: Smuttynose
    New Jersey:
    New Mexico:
    New York:
    North Carolina: Asheville
    North Dakota: Fargo
    Ohio: Flying Pig
    Oklahoma: Route 66, OKC Memorial
    Oregon: Columbia Gorge
    Pennsylvania: Philly Half
    Rhode Island:
    South Carolina: Kiawah Island, Charleston Half
    South Dakota:
    Tennessee: Rock n Roll Nashville
    Texas: Shiner Half, Tour de Fleurs, Alamo Half
    Utah: Salt Lake City Half, Zion Half, Jupiter Peak Steeplechase
    Vermont:
    Virginia: Richmond Half, Shamrock Half
    Washington:
    West Virginia:
    Wisconsin: Brewers Mini Marathon
    Wyoming: Jackson Hole Half

    Ottawa: Tamarack Race Weekend, Courses Gourmandes Series

    Multi State Challenges:
    Bear Lake Trifecta-Idaho, Wyoming, Utah
    I-35 Challenge-Missouri, Iowa
    New England Challenge-Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island
     

    DopeyBadger

    Imagathoner
    Joined
    Oct 15, 2015
    Thank you everyone for the helpful advice! I've been roughly following some of Daniels' training plans, and I train once or twice/week with a team and a coach.

    One of the other factors when it comes to fuelling for me is that I've been following a low carb diet for almost 4 years. I don't generally eat sugar, and my gut doesn't like concentrated sugar anymore. Even diluted sports drinks don't tend to agree with me during runs. I do most of my runs in a fasted state (I do intermittent fasting most days), so my body is very used to running without a lot of fuel. I will try experimenting on my next couple long runs.
    The Daniels plans can be very successful for the marathon. Just remember that per page 50-51 of the third edition of the book that Daniels suggests the long run be limited to 150 min and no more than 25% of the total weekly mileage. It's an important part of the Daniels philosophy because it limits the over reliance on the long run. I've had plenty of runners cap at 11, 13, 15, 17 miles on their long run and still be a converter in the top 25% range for their current fitness (so for you something in the 3:10-3:20 range by not over relying on the long run and just adding a little more to the week and other weekend run).

    As for fueling, I'll have to retract my previous statement because it was based on an "average" runner. But since you're IF and low carb, you're very likely not "average". Where you actually fall in a metabolic efficiency profile would be hard to estimate. A good lab test would be able to give you a rather accurate picture as to how many carbs you may or may not need when running at marathon tempo based on your ability to use fat and carbs as a source of energy. The drawback from the research I've read is that the metabolic efficiency profile is very short term and the values can shift easily from one week to the next. So not something you'd want to schedule any more than a few weeks prior to the race. I am not well versed in IF or low carb, but I do believe I remember reading that the intake of carbs for that category of runners may stunt the ability to stay more reliant on fat during running at pace. I think a good resource would be other IF/low carb runners and how they fuel the marathon distance. I know @canglim52 is IF, but I don't believe he is low carb as well. But he may know someone in his circle that was both.
     

    JulieODC

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Aug 6, 2009
    Tinkerbell 2017 extra pin

    Hi,
    So I thought I lost my pin from this race, and ordered another one of eBay. I just found it in a cranny in my suitcase! I would like to send it to someone who participated and would like it, if anyone wants it. Just let me know.

    It does make me so sad about the Disneyland races!
    What an amazing offer (and find!)! I ran that race and would love it, if you haven’t had another taker!

    re: Aftershokz - I love, love mine- a favorite running accessory I couldn’t do without.
     
  • canglim52

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    Sep 9, 2016
    The Daniels plans can be very successful for the marathon. Just remember that per page 50-51 of the third edition of the book that Daniels suggests the long run be limited to 150 min and no more than 25% of the total weekly mileage. It's an important part of the Daniels philosophy because it limits the over reliance on the long run. I've had plenty of runners cap at 11, 13, 15, 17 miles on their long run and still be a converter in the top 25% range for their current fitness (so for you something in the 3:10-3:20 range by not over relying on the long run and just adding a little more to the week and other weekend run).

    As for fueling, I'll have to retract my previous statement because it was based on an "average" runner. But since you're IF and low carb, you're very likely not "average". Where you actually fall in a metabolic efficiency profile would be hard to estimate. A good lab test would be able to give you a rather accurate picture as to how many carbs you may or may not need when running at marathon tempo based on your ability to use fat and carbs as a source of energy. The drawback from the research I've read is that the metabolic efficiency profile is very short term and the values can shift easily from one week to the next. So not something you'd want to schedule any more than a few weeks prior to the race. I am not well versed in IF or low carb, but I do believe I remember reading that the intake of carbs for that category of runners may stunt the ability to stay more reliant on fat during running at pace. I think a good resource would be other IF/low carb runners and how they fuel the marathon distance. I know @canglim52 is IF, but I don't believe he is low carb as well. But he may know someone in his circle that was both.
    I only use IF and low carb as a tool, but not as an everyday option for high volume marathon running. The only proven benefits that I’ve seen, is the improvement in insulin sensitivity and sleep. There are theories for other benefits, but they haven’t been proven in humans yet. When I’m running higher volumes, I don’t use either though. The nutritional demands are too great, so I reserve these tools for low volume/off days. When I do IF I use 16 hour fast and 8 hours eating(space each meal 2 hours a part), and when I do low carb I still eat about 150-250 g of carbs per day. Low carb is only used when I’m off completely from running and is mainly a result of wanting to keep my fats and protein high for recovery while balancing my total caloric intake.

    I have yet to read an article that has proven high fat is better for endurance training. I’ve actually read the contrary. Additionally I’ve read some interesting articles debunking depletion runs as well. The only thing I still occasional do is a fasted easy run, but again I’m not getting anywhere near depletion and I’m in decent shape even in my off time. Hope this helps!
     

    Kerry1957

    Will run for Hefeweizen
    Joined
    Oct 7, 2017
    I'm a former (recovering?) type 2 diabetic who stays in control by eating very few carbs a day; pretty much no bread, potatoes, rice, chips, cereal, fruit, juice or anything with much added or natural sugar. I was not able to find much helpful scientific literature or anecdotal reports regarding the effects of marathon training on low or ultra low carb diets. So I just stuck to my @DopeyBadger plan and maintained my usual diet. Other than being tired a bit more than usual, I did not see much difference due to the additional miles.

    Carb loading before a race is also a bit of a mystery to me as a diabetic. My carb loading consists of having a bowl of pasta the night before the race; total carb intake for the day is probably still lower than most runners have in a typical day. During the two marathons I ran, I had a good GU gel routine, and pretty much ate anything I saw at the aid stations that looked good at the moment, with PB and J sandwiches a favorite.

    So I guess that either my body has adapted to burning fat while running....or I'm leaving a lot of improvement on the table by running on no carbs. I'm also older (62) and my paces are considerably slower than @Nightriders19 so what works for me may be completely different that what works for him or her.
     
    Last edited:

    Slogger

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jan 5, 2015
    Great list of running events compiled by @PrincessMickey. I want to run ALL of THEM!!!!

    Question for those in hilly terrains. I have a DOWNHILL Marathon (Sprouts-Mesa near Phoenix) coming up in February. Last time I ran a net downhill marathon was at Steamtown in Scranton PA. The rain, humidity, and severe downhills all kicked my butt. Would like to not repeat that experience.

    What are some good tips for running a downhill course? I have lots of hills where I live but most of them are gentle/rolling or very short but steep.
    I think we have treadmills at the gym that will allow you to "decrease" the incline instead of raising it.
    Any suggestions are welcome!
     
    Last edited:

    MissLiss279

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jul 10, 2015
    Great list of running events compiled by @PrincessMickey. I want to run ALL of THEM!!!!

    Question for those in hilly terrains. I have a DOWNHILL Marathon (Sprouts-Mesa near Phoenix) coming up in February. Last time I ran a net downhill marathon was at Steamtown in Scranton PA. The rain, humidity, and severe downhills all kicked my butt. Would like to not repeat that experience.

    What are some good tips for running a downhill course? I have lots of hills where I live but most of them are gentle/rolling or very short but steep.
    Any suggestions are welcome!
    Don’t run them??? 😁
    I had a bad experience with a downhill marathon too. I had a slight foot issue before the race, that I was still fine with running on - wasn’t too painful. The downhill, just made it worse. I tried not to change my gait, but my ankle started to hurt also which I had previously not had issues with. It hurt for several days where I could barely put any weight on it. Also, my quads were sore for days!

    I guess my best suggestion for downhill races is to make sure you do plenty of quad exercises, maybe like bench step ups, squats, iso-squat holds, lunges, anything to really build up the quads. Maybe throw in some hamstring exercises also, so your not just working the front of your leg.
     
  • Professor_Cookie

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Sep 16, 2018
    Great list of running events compiled by @PrincessMickey. I want to run ALL of THEM!!!!

    Question for those in hilly terrains. I have a DOWNHILL Marathon (Sprouts-Mesa near Phoenix) coming up in February. Last time I ran a net downhill marathon was at Steamtown in Scranton PA. The rain, humidity, and severe downhills all kicked my butt. Would like to not repeat that experience.

    What are some good tips for running a downhill course? I have lots of hills where I live but most of them are gentle/rolling or very short but steep.
    Any suggestions are welcome!
    It looks like it’s a loss of a little over 38 feet per mile, so I don’t think it will be too quad abusing. How flat of land do you live it? If you can find a gentle down hill you could do your speedwork down that.
     

    Slogger

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jan 5, 2015
    It looks like it’s a loss of a little over 38 feet per mile, so I don’t think it will be too quad abusing. How flat of land do you live it? If you can find a gentle down hill you could do your speedwork down that.
    I think 650 of the elevation loss comes in the first part of the race. 350 loss after that.
    I live at the bottom of a hill. One side has a gentle rolling uphill that's about 2/10 mile long. The other side has a more severe hill that's about 1/10 to 1/8 of a mile long. Obviously I can run down them instead of up! More severe hills at a local park that are 5-6% grade (short/steep).
     

    Professor_Cookie

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Sep 16, 2018
    I would run on the gentle downhills and work on your running form so that is smooth. Maybe jog up the hills, and do strides down while you figure out you foot falls. (And also see what your actual elevation loss is) Severe downhills are a different beast.
     

    FFigawi

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Dec 28, 2009
    Great list of running events compiled by @PrincessMickey. I want to run ALL of THEM!!!!

    Question for those in hilly terrains. I have a DOWNHILL Marathon (Sprouts-Mesa near Phoenix) coming up in February. Last time I ran a net downhill marathon was at Steamtown in Scranton PA. The rain, humidity, and severe downhills all kicked my butt. Would like to not repeat that experience.

    What are some good tips for running a downhill course? I have lots of hills where I live but most of them are gentle/rolling or very short but steep.
    I think we have treadmills at the gym that will allow you to "decrease" the incline instead of raising it.
    Any suggestions are welcome!
    If the downhill is really steep, try to run on the edges of the road. The slant will generally be less there, making it easier on your ankles. For the downhill running itself, you need to find the balance between leaning too far forward and trashing your quads and leaning too far back & abusing your knees. Try not to just blow down it really fast by letting gravity take over. Your quads will be miserable as soon as they hit a flat or an incline afterwards.
     

    Nightriders19

    Earning My Ears
    Joined
    Jun 7, 2019
    Wow, you folks are such a friendly, helpful group!

    I tried taking some GU chews on my run yesterday. Epic fail. It's been very snowy here in the Great White North and I struggled to open the package with my gloves on. It finally flew open and half the chews fell on the road. The rest were rock hard from being in the cold (even though I had them in my Flip Belt) and made my teeth stick together. So, chews + winter running = bad. Might try a gel next time!

    I eat a low-carb, whole food diet because I'm celiac, and this is by far the easiest way I've found to avoid gluten.
     

    Professor_Cookie

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Sep 16, 2018
    I think 650 of the elevation loss comes in the first part of the race. 350 loss after that.
    I live at the bottom of a hill. One side has a gentle rolling uphill that's about 2/10 mile long. The other side has a more severe hill that's about 1/10 to 1/8 of a mile long. Obviously I can run down them instead of up! More severe hills at a local park that are 5-6% grade (short/steep).
    Okay, so I didn’t have to run today, but I did, FOR SCIENCE(at least that’s what I’m telling myself).

    I did the straightest, flattest run I can do here.
    9B77FE1A-84A0-4248-B3CA-7306D57D7623.jpeg

    0746E7FA-E1F3-4095-B580-887FCB252F7D.jpeg

    617204D2-08E3-4E61-98C3-1C865C6191B0.jpeg

    F567C18F-D622-49EB-AFE7-4D627B39AB83.jpeg

    FF3ECE86-CD77-4399-AF26-D1B0192BDC02.jpeg

    D7021E52-6CEF-40BE-B14C-7B08225C264B.jpeg

    DA0C9059-0C90-4FC8-964D-69E37CC5B1C0.jpeg

    75FED834-F66A-40E8-815F-53A36B12EE33.jpeg

    So for context, this is about what 100 feet of elevation gain OR loss per mile looks like. It’s fairly flat.

    Just don’t stress it. You’ll be fine. 1000 feet sounds like a lot, but spread out over 26.2 it’s not much. If you had to gain it and lose it that would be another thing, but still not that bad.
     



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