Adult Asperger

Discussion in 'disABILITIES!' started by Melodie74, Sep 10, 2017.

  1. Melodie74

    Melodie74 Earning My Ears

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    That will be my first trip in wdw. I come from France and I've got asperger syndrom. When I go to Disneyland PAris, it's not a problem for me because I have a "handicap card" and with this card, I obtain DAS card without problem and they don't ask me questions. I'm a bit afraid to ask this card in wdw, I don't know if i could answer to their questions for my needs (it's difficult when you're on the spectrum and I don't speak english very well). Are there people like me ? How is your experience ?
     
  2. Random Ninja

    Random Ninja DIS Veteran

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    In the US, the cast members aren't allowed to ask for documentation for a DAS because it's considered equal accommodations. You'll have to be able to explain your needs about why the traditional queue is not accessible for you. If you have trouble explaining or with the language, you could write it down and have it translated before your trip. They can look at things written by guests, just not things like doctors notes or "handicap cards/passes".
     
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  4. LadyD

    LadyD DIS Veteran

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    I completely understand where you're coming from with how hard it is to verbally communicate your needs. I'm an adult on the spectrum too. The process seems really intimidating, but the WDW CMs are fantastic at helping you. All you need to do is explain what it is about waiting in the standby line that you are unable to handle and the cast member will evaluate if the DAS would help you. The US system is based on what your particular needs are rather than what your diagnosis is. If you can ahead of time, I would write out a simple note stating the aspects of a normal line environment that you cannot handle/how they negatively impact you and then ask what accomodations they have available for an alternative waiting environment that could meet your needs.

    I have noticed that they have many CMs from all over the world working in guest relations. It is possible you may be able to find one who speaks French to help assist if you're struggling to communicate your needs in English as well.
     
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  5. powellrj

    powellrj DIS Veteran

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    While they can't read anything you have written, you can always write what you want to say and read it to the castmember so you don't have to remember what you want to say.
     
  6. SteveMouse

    SteveMouse DIS Veteran

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    And please remember, the CMs are not interested in your diagnosis. They want/need to know why you cannot wait in the regular queue.
     
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  7. persimmondeb

    persimmondeb DIS Veteran

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    I'd be surprised if they didn't have a cast member handy who spoke at least rudimentary French. It's less common than Spanish in the U.S., but it is a fairly popular subject in high school and many Canadians have at least a little. The way U.S. law works, any public place is required to make reasonable accomodations so that disabled people may enjoy the same access everyone else does. We don't have handicap cards, and they wouldn't be allowed to ask for it even if we did. What they need to know is what you need, such as a quiet place to wait away from the crowds. I do recommend having it written out in English, so you, or someone else, can read it out for them, if there is not a French speaker available. I don't think they are allowed to read it themselves.
     
  8. bumbershoot

    bumbershoot DIS Veteran

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    I think they can read things, just not stuff from doctors with diagnoses.
     
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  9. mamabunny

    mamabunny DIS Veteran

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    There is a great App for your smartphone (I think it was our very own @gap2368 introduced us to it) called "Emergency Chat".

    If you get overwhelmed and can't talk - but could still text - it allows you to type a message on your phone and then hand it to another person who can then type back, or speak verbally to you.

    There is a splash screen that you can customize to let people know that you are overwhelmed and can't speak right now. In your case, @Melodie74 you could even indicate that you prefer to speak in French when possible.
     
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  10. anonymousegirl

    anonymousegirl DIS Veteran

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    Also, I believe the Paris assistance card is very different from the WDW DAS card. In France, to obtain the pass, the guest has to show (prove) a disability, because that card gives them an advantage over non-DAS park guests. In the USA, ADA does not allow WDW to ask for proof and the DAS does not give any advantage. It simply allows the guest to wait their turn elsewhere and then join the FastPass queue. Sorry I can't be clearer, but I have never used the pass at Disneyland Paris. So even once you get the DAS here, it may not work as you are expecting (based on your experience at Disneyland Paris).
     
  11. Melodie74

    Melodie74 Earning My Ears

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    Thanks for these answers. I don't know if i will ask this DAS card. My visit is planned in febuary. I still have time to think about it.
     
  12. FortForever

    FortForever Disney since Day 1

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    I hope you will decide to ask for a DAS. I have an adult son with Asperger's, so I understand your reluctance. He would likely never ask for one. I always ask on his behalf. Being very familiar with your challenges, I am positive your trip would be much better with the DAS. Wishing you courage and a wonderful vacation.
     
  13. OurBigTrip

    OurBigTrip DIS Veteran

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    Cast members can and do read what guests write themselves, but they can't read notes/letters from doctors.
     
  14. marcyleecorgan

    marcyleecorgan DIS Veteran

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    On the bright side, you may not even need it, with some management techniques. And if you DO end up having a serious struggle and still feel you need the DAS then you can get it while you are in the parks.
    It really honestly depends on why you are unable to wait in line with everyone else.
     
  15. SonyaX

    SonyaX Earning My Ears

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  16. gap2368

    gap2368 DIS Veteran

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    RnR only goes upside down 2x not 3x ( it does seem like 3 but it is not)

    Also Disney has something very similar to this already it is very easy to read, and talks about the DAS and has a little more information.
     
  17. AndreaA

    AndreaA DIS Veteran

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    People always say "they don't care about your diagnosis" but that's disingenuous at best. The CMs working at Guest Services are not idiots. They know what autism, ASD, ADHD, etc., are. They've likely heard the terms thousands of times ALONG WITH the specific reasons why a person needs the DAS card.

    You don't need to give them a whole laundry list of what you need. You can simply tell them you have an autism spectrum diagnosis and difficulties waiting in lines/confined spaces/with crowds/with loud noises, whatever you feel comfortable divulging.
     
  18. LadyD

    LadyD DIS Veteran

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    You have to explain what your needs are because the DAS in the U.S. parks are needs based, not diagnosis based. Two people with the same diagnosis can have very different needs. In order to help you get the tools you need to access the parks, you have to explain what your needs are to the CMs. Telling the CM your diagnosis does not help them find a good solution for you. Your symptoms (for a lack of a better term) matter more.
     
  19. AndreaA

    AndreaA DIS Veteran

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    I am not saying that it is wrong to explain what you need, but it is also not wrong to tell the CM your diagnosis, especially if English is not your first language. All needs may not be the same, but if someone is in the line asking for the DAS and saying they have ASD or Aspergers, there's a pretty good chance that their needs are going to fall within the DAS spectrum.'

    I myself barely had to say a word about my son beyond his diagnosis and they were typing up the information. And at that moment, he was acting fine and looked neurotypical.

    IF the CM asks for additional information, then yes, absolutely provide it, but don't hesitate to start off with "I have X,y,z..." And just a short and generic phrase about needing to wait outside the normal line.
     
  20. The Vitaphone Queen

    The Vitaphone Queen Eclipsing the sun in splendor

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    SonyaX, thank you for spreading the word. Hopefully someone will add DAS information, although I don't know much about it. :yay:
     
  21. SonyaX

    SonyaX Earning My Ears

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    I've seen the Disney guide, but found it didn't provide all the information I needed. The one I found had a checklist for rides. If a ride had odd scents, it got a checkmark. But the same checkmark was there for pleasant smells of Soarin' and the horribly disgusting nauseating smells of It's a Bugs life. They're quite different.

    Additionally, all the guides I found were written by neurotypical folks. While I appreciate their help and thoughtfulness, I would also like the information from a fellow autistic. We see the world a little differently.
     
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