WW2 Nurse's packing list -- interesting "stuff"

Discussion in 'Community Board' started by NotUrsula, Jun 19, 2013.

  1. NotUrsula

    NotUrsula DIS Veteran

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    This was posted on a few websites lately, and I thought I'd pass it on, since packing tips are often such an issue here, LOL.

    Slate.com recently ran a photo of the standard recommended packing list for WW2-era Army Nurses being deployed to the European theatre. Note that they went by troopship, a crossing that normally took around 7 days.

    Also note that a WW2 Musette bag measured 12" x 12" x 5" -- do you think you could get all that into one?

    http://www.slate.com/blogs/the_vaul...e_for_wwii_army_nurses_headed_for_europe.html
     
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  3. monkeyboy

    monkeyboy <font color=purple>Strangely fascinated by zombies

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    The greatest generation
     
  4. marthachick

    marthachick Traveling Mom

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    DH had 2 aunts that were WW II WAC nurses. They were very special women who made a huge difference their entire lives. One was in her 80's and was a volunteer in the NICU she worked in after she retired. Awesome women!
     
  5. ilovepcot

    ilovepcot <font color=purple>Caused the first ever Tag Fairy

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    That packing list...WOW! Girdles and lipstick.
     
  6. RNMOM

    RNMOM BLEEDING HEART LIBERAL

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    That's really cool. Thanks for sharing.

    I went to nursing school in 1972. We had a nurse who had been in one of the original classes about 40 years earlier. She came and told us what they had to take to school and had photos. Their lunch and dinner were served in a formal room and they brought their own silver service. We had to find our own meals and ate a lot of mac and cheese/ pizza.

    Live has changed so very much and I love to hear stories from the past.

    What's up with those 'homemade' kotex??
     
  7. chisnpeke

    chisnpeke <font color=blue>Got the blues on purple tag night

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    Thank you so much for sharing! I love stories from WWII and items such as this.
     
  8. Kimberle

    Kimberle <font color=darkorchid>WL Vet<br><font color=blue>

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    My Great Grandma was a nurse. She went to nursing school pre-1910. My Mother also was a nurse. She always wore a girdle to work, plus white hose and a starched cap until the 1980's. The nursing field has changed to much since then.
     
  9. Kies99

    Kies99 I Can has Cheezburger???

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    WWII reenactor/collector here. All of those items listed for packing in the musette bag would be able to fit. The towels were MUCH different than they are today, especially military issue and were very thin and light. Basically everything but the "raincoat" and "Coat, service cap in pocket" would fit inside the musette bag and in the side and back pocket. Both coats could be rolled up and would then lay on the top of the bag but under the flap when closed. It would be full and somewhat heavy, but seeing as this was more or less being used as luggage during transportation and not for field use, it would be doable.
     
  10. DizBelle

    DizBelle CSI: Can't Stand Idiots

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    I thought "Kotex" was a brand of feminine products....
     
  11. happygirl

    happygirl DIS Veteran

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    Thanks for sharing:goodvibes
     
  12. DisDance

    DisDance Mouseketeer

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    Very neat, one thing that surprised me as how informal it seemed to be writtem
     
  13. NotUrsula

    NotUrsula DIS Veteran

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    It is; they were using the term generically to mean a pad. The reason for specifying "home-made" was that they needed to be made of cloth, and since we don't want to go for TMI here, I'll leave you to figure out why. (There were a lot of shortages in Europe during wartime.)

    My mother's youngest sister was also an RN during the War, but not American; she was with the British Army. Their nurses were not actually military at the start of the war, they were part of a civilian organization called Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service. They were very envious of the American nurses being allowed to wear uniform-style clothing on the wards, while they were still stuck wearing starched white aprons and veils. http://www.qaranc.co.uk/qa_world_war_two_nursing.php

    My aunt did not go overseas, but served at rehabilitation hospitals in the UK. However, she married an American officer, so she ended up emigrating to the US on a troopship after the war. If you think that these baggage restrictions were bad, you should see the ones war brides had to follow: she was given one's day's notice of when departure would be, and was only allowed to take ONE bag, small enough to carry by herself. My eldest cousin had been born by then, and he still has the bag that she took with her. It's a carpetbag, which she had to put him into in order to safely carry him onboard ship. The photo that my mother took of the two of them the day she left shows him sleeping in the bag, on top of the diapers, baby supplies, and the two changes of clothing that she could fit in for herself. She wore her regulation navy wool nurse's cape on board ship because she could use it for privacy and to keep the baby warm as well.
     
  14. PrincessKsMom

    PrincessKsMom <img src=http://photopost.wdwinfo.com/data/500/tlk

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    I got a big chuckle from this. My daughter is going to Girls State this weekend and they give you a whole list of stuff you should bring (blanket, pillows, sheets, towels, specific clothing, art supplies, poster paper, blue painters tape, something to do for the talent show, snacks, feminine hygiene products....) and then they tell you not to pack a lot because you have to carry it yourself. :rotfl2:
     
  15. NotUrsula

    NotUrsula DIS Veteran

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    Typical. I'd get her a couple of swimmer's chamois and a big space bag to put the blanket and pillow in (since they are not heavy, but they are bulky.)

    I can tell you from experience that Girl's State is a BLAST. I had so much fun when I did it back in the Stone Age.
     
  16. PrincessKsMom

    PrincessKsMom <img src=http://photopost.wdwinfo.com/data/500/tlk

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    I've heard nothing but fantastic things about Girls State and I'm very excited for her to have this opportunity. Glad you had a wonderful experience. :thumbsup2
     

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