What would turn you off in a house for sale ?

Discussion in 'Community Board' started by pyrxtc, Feb 21, 2013.

  1. phorsenuf

    phorsenuf <marquee><font color=blue>Not so New Rule author o

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    What is the size of that room? Maybe it would be better to call it a 4 bedroom house and have that room be considered an office. I think saying 5 bedrooms and it being under 2,000 sq ft, might instantly turn people off.
     
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  3. The Mystery Machine

    The Mystery Machine Sunrise at my house. :+)

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    We also have to have an "egress window" at least in order for anything to be considered a bedroom as well.
     
  4. bellebud

    bellebud DIS Veteran

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    the Post Office room... you must show that in some way. That's SO cool!!

    Can you get an old photo from your town's records of it?? If you can, frame that and put it on the wall. Or search antique shops (or on-line) for anything from a post office (and old po box drawer, anything!) and put it in that room.

    Again, someone who likes old houses will love that!
     
  5. North of Mouse

    North of Mouse DIS Veteran

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    If you both read my *complete* post, I *did* apologize* to both of you. :goodvibes
     
  6. phorsenuf

    phorsenuf <marquee><font color=blue>Not so New Rule author o

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    Seems you edited it after our replies. So we had read the complete post. No reason why we would go back to re-read it. Seems you didn't read the OP's complete post.
     
  7. North of Mouse

    North of Mouse DIS Veteran

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    Actually, looks like we were typing at the same time. I quoted, then reread the OP, then I immediately corrected it.

    Actually, I DID read the OP's post, just forgot about asking for feedback. Only remembered the part about "what would we look for in a house".
     
  8. phorsenuf

    phorsenuf <marquee><font color=blue>Not so New Rule author o

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    Yes, think along those lines. The house we have in NH is 100 years old. I had pieces in there to reflect the age. An old spinning wheel in front of the fireplace and an old metal pot hanging inside it from the flue hook. I had an antiques treadle sewing machine in the little room off the kitchen. Had shelves in the kitchen with antique kitchen gadgets and such. Little touches like that can really bring out the charm in such places.
     
  9. sunshinehighway

    sunshinehighway DIS Veteran

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    That's a really good idea. Even looking at thrift shops to find stuff might work. I understand not wanting to spend too much money on it. If you play up the right features you won't need much to give it the right feel.
     
  10. tigercat

    tigercat <font color=magenta>Cook, clean and foot massage.

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    Just don't hang it on the ceiling. Hang it a LOT lower than the one's you have showing on the walls now.
    tigercat
     
  11. Iforgetmypassword

    Iforgetmypassword "I am Mrs. Nesbit!!"

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    Thank you.
     
  12. Liberty Belle

    Liberty Belle <font color=green>I was going to reply, but I see

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    Totally agree. If you don't do much of anything else, I'd do this.
     
  13. dogluva

    dogluva DIS Veteran

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    This is such a nice, helpful post. Advice without the rude, mean remarks. I have been horrified by the mean spirited, nasty comments. OP, you have shown such class responding to the awful posts. Good luck with the sale. We have visited your town and its lovely.
     
  14. badblackpug

    badblackpug <font color=blue>If you knew her you would be shoc

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    A few things,

    It isn't unusual for older homes to have an amazing lack of closet space. The house I grew up in was older (circa 1900) and my bedroom didn't have a closet, and my brother's had 1 that was added. However, given that all the bedrooms, save 1, in the OPs house have closets, I would market that 1 room as an office, or craft room, or den, something other than a bedroom.

    I agree with a PP, turn the play room back into a dining room. Removing the table from the kitchen will open it up. It is also easier to make a dining room look nice.

    Pictures should be hung at eye level.

    For me, no fence would probably be a deal breaker, but I have a dog and small kids. Fenced yards are the norm here, but if they aren't there I wouldn't worry about it.

    Earth tones and taupes seem to be popular colors from the era. Google it. I would definitely lighten up the paint colors, and get rid of the wallpaper.

    Play up the things that are left in the house that are of historical significance. The floors, the fireplaces, etc.

    Unfortunately, that garage would be a deal breaker for me. Is it structurally sound? I did pass on buying a house that had a detached garage that needed to be torn down.
     
  15. 2disneyboys

    2disneyboys DIS Veteran

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    OP, when I helped my brother set up his house for staging, we went everywhere throughout the house and took pic's of each room from every angle and then enlarged them on a computer screen. anything that "Jumped" out at us, we took care of. It amazed him how much stuff he didn't notice because it was just part of his normal "background" He looked at the pictures with the thought, would I buy this house based this picture alone. It's easy to dismiss a problem area in your home when you think of your home on a whole, but if the only thing someone is going to see is that "one" spot, would it stop them from even looking further?

    Don't worry about where the couch, table & Chairs are from a "this is how we live" perspective. You want each room to be as visually appealing as possible, Even if it means "you" are a little uncomfortable for the time being.

    Declutter. Then, when you think your done, declutter some more. the less in a smaller room.. the bigger that room looks.

    Things that bother me about house hunting
    1. smells
    2. dusty/not immaculate rooms
    3. clutter in pictures advertising the house
    4. dark rooms (I'm not referring to the room color, but not enough light, natural or artificial)

    #3 really bothers me because all I can think of, is this owner is putting their best foot forward (isn't that what your suppose to do in pictures advertising your home?) and if this is the BEST.. how is it normally? #2 is another one for me as while I don't live in an immaculate house, if I'm looking at your house to possibly buy it, well I don't want to feel "dirty"


    I agree about playing up all the historical details you can about your house. The "market" for your house is going to be people that like historical things.. so play that up!

    Make sure you take the "official pics" in the right light. I don't know if the picture from the front of the house was taken the same day as the one of your backyard, but your back yard pic just looks so clean and "fresh" whereas the front yard looks blah... it's amazing what "lighting" does to a picture so keep this in mind. Take some shots different times of day & different days & then go through & pick the "best" or even better, have the real estate agent pick the best.

    Good Luck w/ the sale & the move OP.
     
  16. tvguy

    tvguy Question anything the facts don't support.

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    Deal breaker for me, at least. My FIL lives in a small town in Texas where fences are less common, just people with kids and dogs seem to have them. But they are all chain link, so you can see through them.
     
  17. ilovepcot

    ilovepcot <font color=purple>Caused the first ever Tag Fairy

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    Wonderful advice offered in such a kind way. How refreshing! :thumbsup2
     
  18. tvguy

    tvguy Question anything the facts don't support.

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    You only need about 800-1000 square feet for the leach field. If you have a 2 acre lot, that's 87,120 square fee, minus however big the house is, you should have plenty of space of build a mansion. Or is the law just you can't change the foot print because of the age of the house? You can't even add on?
     
  19. sunshinehighway

    sunshinehighway DIS Veteran

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    People in New England don't just tear down any house over 50 years old and build mansions.

    Also, the Op has one acre, not two.
     
  20. tvguy

    tvguy Question anything the facts don't support.

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    Okay, I'm confused since OP said you can't build on less than 2 acres.
     
  21. Janepod

    Janepod <font color=royalblue>The new dinning plan is out.

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    Grandfathered, probably. My town (CT) has two-acre zoning but the historic homes (many from 1700s) are grandfathered in. Some are on only a half acre.
     

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