TSA rules for food

Discussion in 'Transportation' started by totallytigger, Mar 1, 2012.

  1. totallytigger

    totallytigger Mouseketeer

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    We are flying down to WDW next Thursday on Direct Air right through lunch time. I have been thinking about packing a PB&J sandwich for my Granddaughter(fussy eater) but not sure how strict TSA is about food. Has anyone done this lately? :confused3
     
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  3. backyardponder

    backyardponder DIS Veteran

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    No problem. The only issue is with liquids. You can pack sandwiches, fruit, candy, etc. etc. Just no canned soda, water, OJ, etc.
     
  4. backyardponder

    backyardponder DIS Veteran

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    Thinking about this a bit more, perhaps you might want to avoid peanut butter. There's lots of folks with allergies...even the vapor (or whatever it is) given off by the peanut butter could be a problem for someone.
     
  5. lost*in*cyberspace

    lost*in*cyberspace DIS Veteran

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  6. CPT Tripss

    CPT Tripss DIS Veteran

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  7. Jestocost

    Jestocost DIS Veteran

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    Peanut butter and jelly (or condiments like mustard, ketchup and mayonnaise) should be OK if they already are prepared into a sandwich. However, many would fall under the liquids rule (since it also includes gels) if they are in packets or containers. That means that they would have to be in marked containers less than 3.4 oz. and in your 3-1-1 bag.

    And, as noted, not all screeners interpret and apply the rules in the same way.
     
  8. bookgirl

    bookgirl DIS Veteran

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    I've taken a pb&j through security no problem. It just needs to be premade. You can't take contaniers with pb or jelly through but a sandwich is no problem.
     
  9. TDC Nala

    TDC Nala <font color=red>1937, what a year that was<br><fon Moderator

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    The other option you may want to consider is if you intend for her to eat the sandwich on the plane, if there is an allergic passenger the airline may request that no peanut or nut products be opened and consumed on the flight. Doesn't happen too often but it does happen.
     
  10. akcire

    akcire <font color=royalblue>Mouse expert, computer chall

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    The rules are a little more relaxed if you are traveling with a child. For example, when I travel with my daughter I am allowed liquids as long as they are declared.

    When we last traveled my husband dropped me and my daughter at the terminal and parked the car, I forgot my daughters yogurt in the car. He remembered it and brought it in. An adult male traveling without a child is not allowe yogurt. I guess the TSA classified it as a liquid. He didn't argue, we just found her a different breakfast food (no full fat yogurt at airports).
     
  11. Betty Rohrer

    Betty Rohrer DIS Veteran

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    i would be more worried about not being able let her eat the P&J on the plane because of an allergery of another passenger. your granddaughter would be more upset if she knew you had and she could not eat it.
     
  12. bookgirl

    bookgirl DIS Veteran

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    I have never had a peanut free flight.

    If you want you can go up before hand and ask, if they do tell you it's peanut free feed her before hand, wash her hands and save her crackers or fruit or some other snack for the actual flight.
     
  13. Jestocost

    Jestocost DIS Veteran

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    A little more relaxed, yes. It's pretty clearly laid out on the TSA.gov site. A jar of peanut butter probably still would not be allowed.
     
  14. lost*in*cyberspace

    lost*in*cyberspace DIS Veteran

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    Probably? A jar of peanut butter definitely will not be allowed through security.
     
  15. tjmw2727

    tjmw2727 DIS Veteran

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    It depends on the age of the child, as indicated in the TSA links posted above there are specific exceptions to the restriction on liquids for "babies and toddlers". Not sure yogurt would have fallen in to the exception category even if you brought it through with your child.

    And Yes, yogurt is considered a liquid/gel as is anything that can't hold its shape without a container.

    OP - I always pack a meal for my kids when traveling and PB &J sandwich is fine as is a bagel & cream cheese or any sandiwich with condiments. Any of those items by them selves have to comply with the liquid restrictions and be in the 3-1-1 bag. I use frozen carrots or grapes in a softside lunch cooler to keep things cold and then purchase drinks after security. This way we can have our own snacks, food & drinks without waiting on the FA to serve. Although personally I also avoid PB when traveling in case of a peanut free flight.
     
  16. Missytara

    Missytara I'm all ears!

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    I have been on peanut free flights; that is why they no longer hand out peanuts as snacks on planes.

    And it might not just affect that flight, but the subsequent flight as well. If there is any residue left on the tray table, and that next person is highly allergic, they would get a reaction.
     
  17. lost*in*cyberspace

    lost*in*cyberspace DIS Veteran

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    Not true. For example, SWA still serves peanuts. So does Delta.

    The peanut industry is strong.
     
  18. goofy4tink

    goofy4tink No tags...not needed! Transportation moderator Moderator

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    Looks like you guys got a very lenient TSA agent. Unless the child is young (infant/toddler) yogurt is not allowed through

    And it is getting to be more and more common to find peanut free flights. I've been on a couple of them myself..both SW. So, best to be prepared.

    I would go ahead and pack the pb/j sandwich. Just be prepared for something happening...just in case. Bring something else with you. I feel your pain though...my dd, 18, still has her pb sandwich every single day for lunch...going on 12 years of this!!!! But, she will eat a bagel and cream cheese at the airport...that helps. Or cheese and carrot sticks.
     
  19. kathie859

    kathie859 DIS Veteran

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    No peanuts:confused3. This must depend on the airline. I can vouch that Delta still offers peanuts as recent as 2 weeks ago.
     
  20. bumbershoot

    bumbershoot DIS Veteran

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    This is what I would do.

    Take the sandwich or two; it will be just fine going through security. Have her eat one very soon before boarding. Bring snacks that aren't as allergenic as peanuts, and allow her those on the plane if she's hungry. After you land, if she's still hungry, break out the other sandwich!

    YES some planes still have peanuts on them (though I think it's been several flights since I've had them served), but just in case there's a severely allergic person on board and it is requested that you not bring out peanut-containing items, she'll be fed before and after, with safe foods in between.

    For me, it's just about kindness. I've learned on the Dis that the vapor from peanut BUTTER isn't allergy-causing (the vapor from non-ground peanuts can be to some people), BUT I imagine a severely allergic person isn't going to want to smell ANY peanuts while on a flight, and I don't want to cause panic while on a plane. So...I won't bring peanuty items onto a plane to be eaten on the plane. At the gate, immediately after getting off the plane, sure, if someone is super hungry at that point yes, but not ON the plane.
     
  21. aubriee

    aubriee <font color=brown><marquee>Chocolate always makes

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    I wonder what they consider a toddler? Feb 4th my husband and I were on an early morning (6:40am) flight from DFW to MCO on American Airlines with our very tiny 3 y/o GS. (He is actually so small that most people think he might be barely 2 y/o.:rotfl:) Our grandson is never without his sippy cup and we thought that as a toddler obviously drinking his apple juice from the cup, that he'd be allowed through security with it. Nope! The TSA agents said he had to dump it. We had a very irritated, sleepy 3y/o.:rotfl:

    OT, but funny: He got really irritated at the gate CMs at WDW who kept saying he couldn't possibly be three to need a park ticket. This kid is not the least bit shy, knows how old he is, and is very verbal about it.:rotfl: We never even considered passing him off as a 2 y/o, but almost every day at the parks the CMs tried to argue that he was too young to need a park ticket.:rotfl: He would inform them in no uncertain terms that he was three (as he held up either two or four fingers--he just can't seem to get three fingers up for some reason:rotfl:.) Even though we were on the DxDDP and our room key said 2A 1C, the same thing happend at the restaurants. It got to the point that as soon as they looked at him and asked how old he was, he'd get a disgusted look on his face, plant both hands on hips, and say, "I'm three, I'm not a baby".:rotfl:
     

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