RN - Associate or BSN

Discussion in 'Budget Board' started by paper1225, Apr 21, 2006.

  1. paper1225

    paper1225 DIS Veteran

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    I am not sure if this is the right board for this-but looking for advice. I have been in school at a local university since Sept'01. Last year I started their nursing program and left after about one month. The nursing schedule was too overwhelming(hours required/week). Now that my son will be in kindergarden full time this fall, I am ready to go back........but have questions. The school I am looking at(Deaconess St.Louis) offeres two programs. One will leave me with an associates, but looks good because all the classes are online. I will visit the hospital for my clinicals-I do not know how often yet. As for the bachelors, I will go to school 2-3 full time days/week. The school offers a RN to BSN degree which I would do once I get a full time job as an RN! I am looking for advice on which degree would be best(I have 3 children in school, and DH). Also, any ideas on what a "real" salary may be when I get into the RN field.....Another thought I am trying to decide is to possibly get a pt job as a patient care tech.....what kind of pay would that be and would it be worth my time? TIA
     
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  3. GalDisney

    GalDisney DIS Veteran

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  4. paper1225

    paper1225 DIS Veteran

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    Thanks GalDisney.......I have done that, and it seems higher than I thought it would be-I hope it would be at that level, but am sure it is not!
     
  5. deltachi8

    deltachi8 Smells of rich mahogany

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    I worked for 4 years in HR at a hospital and did recruiting. The BSN where I work is paid at a slightly higher rate, but not much. Basically, the nurses - Associates or BSN do the same work while on the floor. Now, the BSN will better qualify you for career moves into management and the such if thats what you choose to do.

    If I were giving advice to someone, I would tell them to get the Associates degree, start working as a nurse and then decide if you want to go on for an advanced degree. You may want to study in a specialty or even pursue a MSN. Why wait? Getting some work experience in will help you decide where you want to go long term and then you can better choose if an advanced degree is worth while. Also, once working, many hospitals will help pay your tuition as you go to higher degrees and specializations.
     
  6. daisylou

    daisylou Mouseketeer

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    I personally have a BSN and have never regretted getting it. I always think education is a worthwhile expense. But, I was 18 and went straight through, now that I am married and have children it would be a very different situation. Plus, if you do get your associates degree, many employers offer some sort of tuition assistance so you could conceivably have the RN to BSN portion paid for.

    As for salary, it varies around the country. But, I work a weekend incentive program (WIP) and make a base rate of $29 dollars an hour with a 60% shift differential (so that works out to $46.40 dollars an hour). Nursing is a wonderful career, psrticularly for a mother. I work weekends 11pm-7am after my sons are asleep, and make the same amount of money I made working full time. Plus, I don't need any daycare.

    Good luck in your nursing school journey!
     
  7. mannasn

    mannasn Punk rock mama<br><font color=green>Thinks Toad Sw

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    Check out the boards at allnurses.com for great nursing info.

    New grad nurse pay varies greatly from region to region. In Mississippi, its in the neighborhood of $16-19/hour.

    I think the ADN would be the wiser choice when going to school with a family. I am finishing up my BSN and its really tough schedule-wise (I have two kids and a lengthy commute) - just in the time required to squeeze in the leadership/management, community and research courses along with the nursing ones.

    You can always go back and bridge to your BSN easily - and lots of employers will pay for that.

    Ultimately, I think the BSN is the way to go if you'd like to get into management or get a masters. (not that ADNs aren't in management positions or can't bridge into ADN-MSN programs... I'm just always an advocate of further education)!

    Good luck with school! :)

    Edit to add - I think it would be worthwhile to get a job as a patient tech.. if you can find the time. Unfortunately for me, I couldn't eek out the time in my schedule to work as well as be a decent wife/mom to my kids. Some of my classmates did work, however, and I think it was really beneficial for them to be in the healthcare settings (increased exposure) - especially those that were techs that could do some skills like venipuncture, etc.
     
  8. Fire14

    Fire14 Spartan Living in land of Buckeyes.

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    In my experience the ADN or BSN don't get any pay differance. I personally would do ADN and after working for co have them pay for you to continue your education. One deciding factor maybe if you wish to specialize in an area.
     
  9. fakereadhed

    fakereadhed The Tag Fairy has me on "ignore"!

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    I have my ADN. I had several years experience before the BSN bandwagon, so I didn't get mine. With experience, I haven't had it come into play as far as staff nursing jobs go. However, I think it would be a problem for entry level jobs and also if you ever want to move up in the nursing world you will need a BSN before you can continue with further education.

    That aside, I think that if I had to do it over again, I would be a PA(physicain's assistant) for several reasons. Less education than BSN, same pay or more, and more respect. Nursing is a thankless profession most of the time, and you are not respected for the amount of responsibility you have- not by most doctors OR patients for what you do.

    I like working in the medical field despite that, but no one tells you about the real world when you are going to school. Everyone just smiles and says good for you, so I thought I would tell it like it is.
     
  10. mannasn

    mannasn Punk rock mama<br><font color=green>Thinks Toad Sw

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    I thought PA had moved to a master's level specialty, now?
     
  11. princess mom of 4

    princess mom of 4 They call me MomPossible

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    Although I have a BSN, I too would recommend starting with ADN and letting my employer pay for the continued education. I work in a place where our nursing administrator doesn't even have a BSN (just an old style "diploma") so there's no recognition for BSN vs ADN at all - work the same, pay the same, advancement the same. Good luck with whatever route you choose - it is a worthwhile career, and certainly lots of job security as the country ages...
     
  12. rkandmjsmommy

    rkandmjsmommy <font color=blue>2006: A year for letters....<br><

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    I graduate May 17 with an Associates as an RN :banana: :Pinkbounc :banana: :Pinkbounc it has been the HARDEST 2 years of my life. I did all my pre reqs from Sept 2001-Sept 2004 then have done the nursing classes adn clinicals for the past 2 years. I have a 7 year old and 4 year old. I am going on for my Bachelors starting in January, I only have 9 classes to take :teeth: YOU CAN DO IT

    Good luck
     
  13. dvcgirl

    dvcgirl DIS Veteran

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    I would get your associates degree first. It's been about 6 years since I worked as a nurse, but I had my BA from another school, and worked in public relations for a comapany. I didn't really like what I was doing and so decided to take a totally different turn and went to nursing school. I decided to get my associates and see if I liked it. Guess what....I ended up *really* not liking nursing ;). And I was very, very happy that I hadn't spent any more time going for my degree than the two years I put into it.

    I can tell you that the BSN prepared nurses started out making 30 cents more per hour than the AAS nurses...not exactly worth 2 years of additional education. Of course, if you wanted to go into management, you needed a BSN for the most part. I knew within a year of working as a nurse that I would never ever in a zillion years want management in a hospital situation. This all may have changed, but this is how it was back when I was in that game.

    I totally agree with the poster who said that nursing is a thankless job. I've never felt more unappreciated in my life than the time I put into that job. All through nursing school such lofty ideals are pushed forth about nursing being a "profession". Perhaps as the higher levels nurses get some respect...I don't know. What I had was a job, and an underpaid job at that. All that I can tell you is that even working as a critcal care nurse, where nurses tend to get more respect, there is really little there.

    Also agree with others here who have said that nursing school is actually quite challenging. When I went to school you needed an 80% on all finals in order to advance. By the time I graduated we had lost 60% of our original class number. It was far more stressful than getting my BA at a liberal arts school....that's for damn sure. Of the 80 something people who did graduate at least half of us are no longer in nursing. It's a shame, but actually quite common.
     
  14. emh1129

    emh1129 <font color=green>I admit, though, that I had Disn

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    Congratulations!! :cheer2:
    I have been working on my pre reqs for a while now and will be starting my ADN soon.. I'm excited (and really nervous!) ;)
    I plan to get my MSN in midwifery after a few years.. ahh.. I'm going to be in school forever :rotfl:
     
  15. bugbugmom

    bugbugmom DIS Veteran

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    Hey Paper1225,

    I'm a RN working in a ER in the STL area. I've been out of school for 21 years . I think it would be great for you to get your ADN and then work and let the hospital pay for your BSN. Also, nursing in the STL area is good. I only hold an diploma in nursing, but would like to start working on my BSN since my youngest will be in kindergarten. I'm not sure what a new GN starting salary is..but I've heard from 18 to 22 dollars. However, weekend option in the STL area pays between 30-45 dollars an hour not including weekend differential or shift differential. Any other questions...feel free to PM me. Good Luck.
     
  16. mickeymousemom

    mickeymousemom Missing: Three tags last seen in this space. Larg

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    I'm also in and out of school to get my nursing degree..right now I'm taking some time off to take care of my toddler...I have also struggled with the same thing you're struggling with. After talking to friends and nurses in our local hospital, I've decided to go for my Associates degree. I have no desire to get into management and it seems that's the big difference..around here anyway. I've also been told that the pay rate around here is almost no different for a BSN than an ADN. At our local hospital, the BSN nurses aren't even allowed to have "BSN" after their name on their nametag anymore. Needless to say they aren't happy about it. I figure if I change my mind I can always go back and get my BSN with a few more classes. I would say that out of all the nurses I've talked to around here, almost 100% of them advise not to get my BSN unless I want to get into management. I'm only doing this because I love medicine and with my DH working in the auto industry, it would be nice to know we would have at least one good income coming in and i could work anywhere. I only plan on doing it part time...my main concern is being home with my kids!
     
  17. plutofreak

    plutofreak See you in a month Mickey!!

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    Well, I have a ADN, finished school in Jan 06, and found out today

    I PASSED BOARDS

    Any who, I work at a Children's Hospital in New Orleans, our base is 20.50.
    BSN do not get anymore. The only difference is that BSN can move to management. I chose the ADN program, 1) easier to get in to 2) only 2 years

    Now I do plan on receiving my BSN in a couple of years, but for now I want to work, and get used to the profession. I must say it is much more rewarding than I ever thought it would be.

    Good Luck, and see your dream through I really is worth it
     
  18. mannasn

    mannasn Punk rock mama<br><font color=green>Thinks Toad Sw

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    Congrats, PlutoFreak! What a relief!

    I hope I can be posting the same happy news in a few weeks! :)
     
  19. jenr812

    jenr812 <font color=deeppink>I'm wondering how outta hand

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    Is that you manna from allnurses? I always enjoy reading your posts :)

    I agree about checking out allnurses.com. Totally addicting just like the DIS :thumbsup2 Well not as much fun as the DIS but you get the idea ;)

    I will graduate in May 2007 with my ADN. It has been really difficult with a family. I plan to get my BSN after I start working (and let the hospital pay fro it :teeth: ). Then when my 3 yo is older (high school age) I want to get my Master's and be a CNM.

    As others have said, the pay difference between ADN and BSN isn't much, esp. as a new grad. My ADN program isn't mostly online so I still spend a lot of time in class, plus we have about 2-4 hours of lectures on CD to listen to each week along with hundreds of pages of reading. Hard, but worth it. I'm not sure how intensive a BSN program here would be as the nearest school was too far for me to consider. But the way I am doing it seems pretty much the norm for moms.

    Good luck in whatever you decide. I am pleased to see so many nurses and nursing students here at the DIS :cheer2:
     
  20. jenr812

    jenr812 <font color=deeppink>I'm wondering how outta hand

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    CONGRATS!!! That is wonderful news! :cheer2:
     
  21. mickeygaga

    mickeygaga Mouseketeer

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    First of all, good luck to you on whatever path you choose. Speaking from experience, in Indiana a Registered nurse is a Registered nurse whether your have an ASN or BSN. The pay is equal. However, ASN's usually are not allowed to be charge nurses or managers. Managers and Charge nurses do make more.I have my ASN and currently work as a charge nurse when needed. The nice thing about pursuing your ASN first is that you have the option to work as a Registered Nurse sooner. The Rn to BSN programs are offered totally on-line so you could pursue your BSN while working. Also, new grad BSN nurses will not be managers from the start, so you would be able to gain much needed floor experience with your ASN wile obtaining your BSN at your own pace giving you experience and education to obtain management positions. I am almost finished with my BSN and feel this was the best route financially (and mentally) for myself and my family. My sister is finishing up her ASN this spring and will be taking on-line BSN courses in the fall. I wish you the best of luck- and remember you can do it-you can do it!!!!!!
     

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