Rant: Kids Menu= Horrible Diet

Discussion in 'Disney for Families' started by MaleficentandGoons, Aug 5, 2010.

  1. michael's mom

    michael's mom DIS Veteran

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    I can see that you have an infant at home who I assume is still either nursing or having bottles with solid foods being introduced. I certainly hope she is an adventurous eater so you won't know the struggles that us parents of picky eaters have.

    I know the question wasn't directed at me, but I can tell you, as a parent of a very picky eater, it certainly isn't something "I allowed" and I hope you are aware that many parents try and try and keep trying to introduce new foods to their children, and that we're not all lazy about what we feed our kids. It took over 3 years for my son to put a piece of real meat into his mouth. And then, it was only chicken. It was another 6 months before he'd put a piece of beef or pork into his mouth. He still will not eat a vegetable. But, we give them to him anyway. They are always on his plate and we encourage him to eat them. But I will not force it down his throat either. We've spoken to his pediatrician about this concern many times and he has advised us to continue to introduce it to him but not force it. Between dr's appointments and conferences at school, we know DS has a slight sensory issue and certain textures bother him. Most of his sensory issues are oral (he hates having his teeth brushed, wouldn't eat food that had to really be chewed for a long time, etc.) Heck, he wouldn't touch play-doh until he saw how much the other kids liked it. So it really isn't a choice of ours that his meals are so limited and repetitive and there are a lot of parents with years of parenting experience that work hard everyday to feed their picky eaters as best as they possibly can. Nobody wants their kids to be overweight and unhealthy.

    My son goes to school with fruit and a cheese stick most days for snack. I can tell you that he probably had a cookie in his lunchbox 1 or 2 days this whole year (he's in PK so no lunch). I have weight issues myself and it has been very important to my husband and me that my son eats healthily...but, his diet is very boring. Made up of mostly dairy. Yogurt for breakfast everyday, usually some sliced chicken and cheese for lunch (or a grilled cheese), and whatever we have for dinner (and now, he usually only eats the meat).

    So we do our best to find healthy options that DS will eat and try to stay away from the junk food. But he's still picky and his menus are still boring and repetitive.

    DH and I have opted against the DDP because we know DS won't even eat the traditional kids meals. We are driving and will be bringing food with us that we know will keep DS satisfied and regular ;)

    I can understand the frustration that those parents whose children are adventurous eaters have (and if you only have a 7 month old, you most likely don't really know what kind of eater your child is yet until real textures are introduced). I also agree that there should be a healthy choice on every CS menu everywhere for both adults and children. But, I think that the preaching style of many in this discussion to "us lazy parents of the so-called picky eaters" is inappropriate because for all you know, we're working harder to find healthy options for our kids than the parents whose kids will eat anything.
     
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  3. PrincessTiffany

    PrincessTiffany Is there anything better than Free Dining and Fast

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    So you have one child, under the age of one? Why don't you come back after you have a few more kids and little more experience under your belt before you judge some others on here so harshly.

    I have 4 kids who have all been raised by the same two parents, in the same household, with the same rules. I have two kids who will pretty much eat anything you put in front of them, 1 that will try some new things, but not too adventurous and 1 child who is about as picky as they come. All kids are different and I've learned in my 14 years of parenting that some battles just aren't worth fighting. As my pediatritian told me, "she will eat when she's hungry and she will try new things when she feels like it. As long as she is heathy and is growing, don't worry about it." And you know what, I don't!
     
  4. michael's mom

    michael's mom DIS Veteran

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    :thumbsup2
     
  5. Duckiedee

    Duckiedee Mouseketeer

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    I have found with my girlie, and many of my friends' kids that they definitely go through 'picky' stages too. (Of course not comparing this to those with food issues of some kind.)

    I don't care if she eats 'boring' at this point... so if she has to eat just carrots, cucumbers and beets (for example) as veggies; apples, bananas and grapes for fruit and chicken or beef, yogurt and cheese with and whole grain bread and cereal over and over - I don't really care... I just stock it!

    I'm lucky she does eat a wider variety than what I've mentioned, but some times it seems like days will go by and she just wants the same thing.

    I can see how it would be frustrating to parents whose picky eater will NOT eat the limited healthier choices on the menu and definitely feel for those kids who want a greater variety.

    I agree with the PP you can't force food choices on a kid... I know we do the same, we put everything we eat on her plate and have her try it, after one bite she is free to leave the rest... I make sure she gets her nutrition with stuff she does like.

    At home you don't have to force your kids and you can control not brining into the house anything you don't want them to eat. It's harder when out though as they can see what other people are eating and will question (or more likely rant (at five)) about HOW COME THEY have fries etc. :laughing:

    My DD had a bit of a meltdown the other day when I said no to a huge freezie at noon after I had allowed a sucker at ten in the morning (that she found from a treat bag she had been given two nights before) and after scrounging cheesies off a cousin an hour later.

    But that's me... I don't expect anyone else to do it - and you notice that NONE of this food was offered by me... You have to roll with it a lot of the time... and you certainly can't BAN it (I think there would be a teen rebellion about that - undoing anything you try to teach) but better CS choices, less blatant advertising etc, WOULD make it easier.

    Sorry OP if I am getting off topic - I LOVE talking healthy food and sharing ideas on family nutrition! :)
     
  6. Indiana Rose Lee

    Indiana Rose Lee Baby Factory Extraordinaire! ;)

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    duckie, do you make baked beet chips for your little girl? I just heard about them a couple of months ago and we are going through tons!

    and I will second the different kids different tastes. One of mine hates spicy foods out of a household of thai, mexican and indian food lovers. 2 hate cheese although there is no allergy or intolerance.
     
  7. Alexander

    Alexander DIS Veteran

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    I have one child (12) who will eat anything and everything, and since hitting puberty lots of that anything and everything!:lmao:

    I also have one child (4) who will eat nothing! Rolls (not bread, just rolls), chicken (but only the white meat), macaroni (must be penne pasta shaped). And must have ketchup on EVERYTHING!

    These kids have two completely different eating preferences. This is not because I made them this way, it is just the way they are!

    I am also just curious--OP, have you even ever looked at or ordered from the children's menu at WDW? There are a lot of things on there to choose from.
     
  8. candies

    candies Earning My Ears

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    Have more kids, come back and talk about picky eating kids. I had one brother,one sister ,growing up I was very picky but my siblings would eat anything that was offered. Same parenting style but children have their own choices.
     
  9. Duckiedee

    Duckiedee Mouseketeer

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    I actually haven't - but if you have a recipe - I would love it (for her AND me!) LOL.

    She actually likes many veggies, I was just kinda making a point (we have gone through the - only carrots and broccoli stage once in awhile.

    She actually eats many more veggies than I did as a kid (she'll ask for third and fourth helpings of spinach salad for example.) And she is bananas about asparagus.

    Tomatoes and mushrooms - not so much (doesn't even like pizza sauce - who's kid it this???). Red peppers are an on and off type of thing with her. I keep getting her to try it at least weekly, but she usually just spits it out - I think tomatos are a texture thing for her.

    I'm so lucky she goes to an independant school and in PreK they served lunch and it was all extremely healthy and varied. (everything from tofu, almond butter, spinach, quinoa, some vegetarian meals and so on....) The school also has a big policy on no sweets for snacks. (We send her own food starting this year.) Woo hoo!!! :worship: :banana: Her school goes right up to grade 12.

    They don't do "pizza" or "hotdog" days. Younger grades are even limited to $1 for bake sales and they are allowed to buy 1 item only that they have to take home. Makes our life SO much easier!!!

    Anyways... I continue to digress! LOL.
     
  10. Maggie'sMom

    Maggie'sMom DIS Veteran

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    :thumbsup2:worship:
    As the parent of a SPD child, thank you for stating this.

    When DD was a baby/toddler, I was determined she would be a healthy and adventurous eater. And in the beginning, I was successful. When I began introducing table food, she ate grilled chicken. She'd scarf down 3 helpings of lima beans. She would eat 3/4 of an entire baked sweet potato. Things that a lot of kids wouldn't touch, she would eat. I was so proud of myself and my "excellent parenting."

    But then slowly, food by food, she stopped eating these things. She stopped eating even the no-so-healthy favorite foods of hers, like mac and cheese. I was stumped. I was frustrated. She was always on the small side, at the bottom of the percentiles, but then she completely fell off the charts. Her pediatrician was no help. He was of the opinion "just put the food in front of her and she'll eat when she gets hungry enough." But she wouldn't. There were days when one spoonful of Cheerios and a couple cups of milk were all she would take in. I didn't give her juice and I was limiting her milk to try to get her to eat food. She was losing weight that she didn't have to lose.

    I switched to a new pediatrician and took it upon myself to contact behavioral specialists. What happened over the next 3 years was frustrating journey into an alphabet soup of diagnoses. Her food issues were just one symptom of much larger problems. DD is now 6, and it still wasn't until about 15 months ago that a nurse practioner finally picked up on the fact that the food issues were related to sensory problems. And in that 15 months since, DD has now at least quadrupled her list of foods she will eat.

    So my point is, I learned an important lesson. You cannot make judgements on other people's parenting skills because you have not walked in their shoes. Sometimes "picky eaters" are not that way because of poor parenting. And it's best not to pat yourself on your back for being such a superior parent because you never know if or when you will be faced with a situation you weren't planning on.
     
  11. michael's mom

    michael's mom DIS Veteran

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    You're welcome. It's very frustrating to know how hard you work to feed your child right, to then have complete strangers without a clue making quick judgements about your parenting.

    I'm glad you finally have made some progress with your daughter. DS is 4 and I am hoping that someday he'll chew a vegetable (other than a cucumber) and swallow it (or an apple, or a grape :) )
     
  12. Indiana Rose Lee

    Indiana Rose Lee Baby Factory Extraordinaire! ;)

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  13. mejkjj97

    mejkjj97 DIS Veteran

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  14. Duckiedee

    Duckiedee Mouseketeer

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    Thank you for the recipe!!
     
  15. luckylady131

    luckylady131 Mouseketeer

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    Thanks for your story. My daughter is 4yrs old. She's as picky as they come. She doesn't like meat. Lives off of dairy. And occassionally eats vegetables. But she only eats certain foods. I am pretty sure she has a sensory issue (even if it's slight). She's way on the low end of the charts for weight. I am wondering if I should contact some docs about it. Her pediatrician gave me some names of pedi pyschologists. I just ahven't made the appt yet.

    It's good to hear your LO is eating more now!
     
  16. PrincessTiffany

    PrincessTiffany Is there anything better than Free Dining and Fast

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    Take the advise of a Mom with a kid with Dyspraxia and high-functioning Asperger's (by the way, she's not the picky eater of the family), CALL TODAY! Also, I would go see a pediatric neurologist first and then let them refer you to a pediatric psychologist, if needed. I let too many well meaning people, including my pediatrician, tell me "wait a while, she'll grow out of it." She didn't and we are kicking ourselves now.
     
  17. MaleficentandGoons

    MaleficentandGoons Mouseketeer

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    I'm a one child type of person. I cant even imagine paying for college for more than one child let alone keeping my personal lifestyle. I work with kids and have for 10 years so while i might not have a lot of kids , i do at the same time. This summer I watched kids turn away healthy choices for lunch at the camp i work at. When i was asked to speak to parents/nannies i was told yeah he's a picky eater. Wanting junk food isn't being picky and the fact that most kid menus only supply junk is disturbing. Not just WDW, everywhere.
     
  18. melancholywings

    melancholywings <font color=royalblue>How do you prepare for a ban

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    I agree - it is really unacceptable that 'crap' is the only thing on most children's menus now. And it's always the same old crap. DD is loves trying new foods.

    At Disneyworld her and I would usually share my meal - or I'd use mine to round her's out more. We often used her QS credits later to buy things that we'd snack on as a family later, or things she could snack on in the parks. Like the PB&J at Pop.

    I love Red Robin and Claim Jumper. Both offer several fruit and veggie side choices on their kid's menu.
     
  19. Maggie'sMom

    Maggie'sMom DIS Veteran

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    Meat was the very first thing DD stopped eating. Beef went first, followed by pork, turkey, and chicken. The only vegetable DD has kept eating the whole time is green beans, but they have to be fresh and steamed until just a little tender. If they are cooked too long, forget it.

    If her pediatrician gave you names of child psychologists, then I'd highly recommend you contact them. And don't wait to call because some child psychologists have long waiting lists. There's no harm in talking to them. Either they will talk to you, evaluate your DD, and tell you nothing is wrong, or they will be able to help. There's no downside in making an appointment.
     
  20. MaleficentandGoons

    MaleficentandGoons Mouseketeer

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    Also I'm not judging the parenting. It is your kid do what you want. What I am judging/questioning is how did these foods become "The Kid Menu" Like i said when i grew up if i didn't finish my vegetables i wasn't allowed to leave the table and if i didn't like what was for dinner it was pbj. Obviously everyone has favorites as well as things the don't like. This has nothing to do with kids with "sensory" issues.
     
  21. princess pooh

    princess pooh <font color=deeppink>I bet there's some jerk livin

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    According to your ticker your vacation is five years from now. I'm sure the children's menus won't be exactly the same by then, and there are CS restaurants that already have healthier kids options. Are you really concerned about feeding your daughter lunch five years from now or are you just trying to brag about how great a mom you are?
     

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