Literally.

Discussion in 'Community Board' started by ILoveToRun, Sep 29, 2012.

  1. Imzadi

    Imzadi Saved by an angel in a trenchcoat

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    Hmm, :scratchin I don't say literally much. Actually, I say "actually" a lot. Literally, I do. :teeth:
     
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  3. kaytieeldr

    kaytieeldr Reserving the right to make jokes out of typos - b

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    Mm, you could probably leave out "literally" and end up with a more powerful, effective statement ;),
     
  4. kaytieeldr

    kaytieeldr Reserving the right to make jokes out of typos - b

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    Absolutely. I absolutely understand what you're absolutely saying here. Absolutely.

    Me? I don't overuse any words, as far as I know.










    :rotfl:
     
  5. Imzadi

    Imzadi Saved by an angel in a trenchcoat

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    Well. . . umm, actually. . .




    :teeth: ;)
     
  6. kaytieeldr

    kaytieeldr Reserving the right to make jokes out of typos - b

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    Actually, Imzadi, if you actually have something to actually say to me, you should absolutely just actually literally come out and actually say it. Absolutely.







    :lmao:
     
  7. Jennasis

    Jennasis DIS life goes on

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    My cousin and I have a game where we hit an invisible buzzer every time my sister says the word "literally" which is very, very often. If she gives us the oh-so-awesome "ALMOST LITERALLY" it's worth double points.
     
  8. lucas

    lucas °o°

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    Totally. :hippie:
     
  9. chipsgirl1030

    chipsgirl1030 Mouseketeer

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    I once worked with a woman who used the word literally all the time. The only problem was she pronounced it little- ly. I thought I was the only one who noticed until another coworker pointed it out.
     
  10. kimmar067

    kimmar067 TAGS?? It's all about the 'likes' now!

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    ....:scratchin.....hmmmm....well, she literally COULD, if she were a hard-boiled egg....
     
  11. mrsklamc

    mrsklamc <font color=blue>I apologize in advance, but what

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    "You keep on saying that word. I do not think it means what you think it means."
     
  12. eliza61

    eliza61 http://www.wdwinfo.com/dis-sponsor/images

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    why? why does it bother you? it's an internet forum, not a thesis paper or a resumer
     
  13. kimmar067

    kimmar067 TAGS?? It's all about the 'likes' now!

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    [​IMG]
     
  14. kimmar067

    kimmar067 TAGS?? It's all about the 'likes' now!

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    "Hello, my name is Inigo Montoya. You killed my father. Prepare to literally die."
     
  15. Rylee

    Rylee DIS Veteran

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    I bet you are absolutely related to the Anthony's.
     
  16. CajunMomof3

    CajunMomof3 DIS Veteran

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    pixiedust: This literally made me laugh out loud!
     
  17. mrsklamc

    mrsklamc <font color=blue>I apologize in advance, but what

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    Misuse of literally doesn't really bother me so much as it just makes me roll my eyes or shake my head. 'Epic' has been bothering me lately though.
     
  18. StephyDee

    StephyDee One day the tag fairy will pity me enough to give

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    :rotfl:


    This is such an awesome thread. Doesn't hurt that the "Princess Bride" reference connects with the shirt I'm wearing. It's actually a "PB" shirt, believe it or not. :thumbsup2

    As for using the word 'literally', I hear it used in the wrong context so often at work, that I have to keep reminding myself how to correctly use it. Otherwise I'd be just as bad as them. :rotfl2:
     
  19. mrsklamc

    mrsklamc <font color=blue>I apologize in advance, but what

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    Is it the nametag shirt? That is DH's second most commented shirt.
     
  20. kaytieeldr

    kaytieeldr Reserving the right to make jokes out of typos - b

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    Despite referencing Disney, I'm 100% certain the OP was posting a general vent at everyone who misuses the word - not just DIS posters.

    But since you brought up the "this is just a message board" argument... People who use that word wrong informally use it wrong formally, too. People don't just change their understanding and usage of a particular word based on the seriousness of the discussion or document.
     
  21. Rylee

    Rylee DIS Veteran

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    The Word We Love To Hate

    http://www.slate.com/articles/life/the_good_word/2005/11/the_word_we_love_to_hate.html


    As is often the case, though, such "abuses" have a long and esteemed history in English. The ground was not especially sticky in Little Women when Louisa May Alcott wrote that "the land literally flowed with milk and honey,"nor was Tom Sawyer turning somersaults on piles of money when Twain described him as "literally rolling in wealth," nor was Jay Gatsby shining when Fitzgerald wrote that "he literally glowed," nor were Bach and Beethoven squeezed into a fedora when Joyce wrote in Ulysses that a Mozart piece was "the acme of first class music as such, literally knocking everything else into a cocked hat." Such examples are easily come by, even in the works of the authors we are often told to emulate.

    Eventually, though, literally began to be used to intensify statements that were themselves figurative or metaphorical. The earliest examples I know of are from the late 18th century, and though there are examples throughout the 19th century—often in prominent works; to my earlier examples could be added choice quotations from James Fenimore Cooper, Thackeray, Dickens, and Thoreau, among many others—no one seems to have objected to the usage until the early 20th century.
     

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