Would this be an appropriate reason to request DAS?

Discussion in 'disABILITIES!' started by LibrarianBecky, Aug 5, 2018.

  1. LibrarianBecky

    LibrarianBecky Mouseketeer

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    My husband has a back condition that makes it very difficult/painful to stand for extended lengths of time. He's generally fine if he can walk, can do okay if he can lean on a wall for the standing still portion, and sitting is always good. We are considering requesting a DAS because there are a few rides that he would like to do that he is leery of waiting in line for. He does not ride roller coasters or anything jerky because of his back, so he wouldn't request for anything like that. Things like Small World, though, he is able to ride....but the que makes it difficult for him to do so. I think it would be appropriate for him to request a DAS, but as we have never used them before, I wasn't 100% sure.

    If I understand correctly, the way it works is that he would request a DAS at guest relations. They would load that information on to his magic band. At a ride where he didn't think he would be able to stand in the line, we would approach the CM in the stand by line to get a return time for the ride. At that point, we could do something else and just come back to the fastpass line when it is time. Is that correct?

    Thank you for the help--it is much appreciated.
     
  2. Mrsjvb

    Mrsjvb DIS Veteran

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    no. it is considered a stamina/mobility issue and the response would be to use a mobility device. rent one form off site so he can use it everywhere( lines to wait for transportation to and from the resort for instance)
     
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  4. Hoodie

    Hoodie <font color=purple>Going to BC and GF with one wee

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    You can request it, but be prepared to be denied. This usually falls into the mobility category. Renting an ECV may be an option. You can also rent a wheelchair and push it (it's great to hold bags and things, and then he can be pushed in the lines. He can also work on stretches and other ways to relieve the pain.

    I understand - my back is usually better when I'm walking. Not great when I'm sitting, but standing and shifting knocks it out. For me, the worst isn't the line - most move enough to keep walking pretty steadily. The worst is the buses. Be prepared to wait for empty buses, or first on if you need it. It can take a couple of rounds. Standing on the buses is the worst!
     
  5. gap2368

    gap2368 DIS Veteran

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    Since he needs a place to sit ( he can not stand for a long time ) the CM will more ten likely tell him no to the DAS.

    this is taken from Disney FAQ on the DAS,

    Does a Guest whose disability is based on the necessity to use a wheelchair or scooter need DAS?

    A Guest whose disability is based on the necessity to use a wheelchair or scooter does not need a DAS. Depending on the attraction, Guests utilizing a wheelchair or scooter will either wait in the standard queue or receive a return time at the attraction comparable to the current wait time. For some attractions at Walt Disney World Resort, these Guests will go directly to an alternate entrance. Guests with additional needs should discuss them with Guest Relations.


    I would think since there is no guarantee of a set anywhere and they are taking away benches in the park that having one with him will be a good idea. there is also no guarantee that the line will not be longer then what he can handle ( ride breaks down a guest needs more time to board they bring a new ride vehicle on and so on. I would encourage him to get a roller/ wheelchair so that he will have something when he needs it.

    Also, most lines are slow moving you can help with this by standing a little behind your husband to give him some more room to move back and forth side to side in lines
     
  6. LibrarianBecky

    LibrarianBecky Mouseketeer

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    Thank you all for the information. It is much appreciated. Unfortunately, my husband will not do a wheelchair or EVC out of misplaced pride. It simply isn’t an option. He would rather just not ride. It is good for us to know that we shouldn’t count on the DAS, though.
     
  7. gap2368

    gap2368 DIS Veteran

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    I know someone like this that will not use a wheelchair, one thing you can do is make a little bubble for him by standing behind him ( like I said before) and make sure you check the app for FP since he can not do the big rides you should not have a hard time finding FP for the smaller ones you can refresh the app and different one will come up once you get your time try for a closer time by you guessed it refreshing the app. here is a thread ( yes it is long ) on the refreshing the app. https://www.disboards.com/threads/“refresh”-is-my-new-favorite-strategy.3687564/. I have not read it all but if you have not heard of refreshing I would skim it at lest.
     
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  8. A Mickeyfan

    A Mickeyfan DIS Veteran

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    Can your husband sit long? I cannot sit or stand long with my back. A scooter will not help me and a wheelchair I'd be up and down too much. Besides the fact it's going to strain my back trying to wheel it with me in it. As long as I am walking/moving there's no pressure on my back. If I'm still, I lean up against something as your husband needs to.
     
  9. kaytieeldr

    kaytieeldr Post hoc, ergo propter hoc

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    Strategic use of FastPass along with a good touring plan.

    Buffer zone between him and you in lines provides opportunity and space to pace.

    Does he or anyone he knows wear glasses? A mobility device is simply a tool, like glasses, to improve life experience.
     
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  10. Queen of the WDW Scene

    Queen of the WDW Scene DIS Veteran

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    Its a very clear mobility issue in which a wheelchair would be much more appropriate than a DAS which is what guest services would probably say to you.
     
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  11. chloelovesdisney

    chloelovesdisney DIS Veteran

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    It can work out even if they deny it, I just work FP+ all day long. I'm not renting a scooter for my bad back, it's ridiculous.
     
  12. Queen of the WDW Scene

    Queen of the WDW Scene DIS Veteran

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    It's not ridiculous if it would help.
    Ridiculous is when someone is stubborn.
    If you have found ways to work around it great but it would be a decent option for the OP's situation but sounds like pride wins out.
     
  13. Pumbaa_

    Pumbaa_ >Hakuna Matata!< Moderator

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    Pride does. Not make a fun vacation
     
  14. mamabunny

    mamabunny DIS Veteran

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    First of all, please tell your husband, that him - on an ECV, or in a wheelchair - is a total non-event at WDW. No one is going to care. No one is going to pay him any attention... Unless he's Brad Pitt, George Clooney, or some other guy I would throw the ol' hubs off the sidewalk to get to... no one is going to care. Sorry if that hurts his ego, but it's true. Most of the other Guests at WDW are busy doing one of 3 things, and NOT paying attention to anyone, or anything else. Those are, in no particular order:

    1. Looking for an "Instagram Wall"
    2. Taking (yet another) selfie with (fill in the blank) as a backdrop (can be a Castle, "Instagram Wall" or some other random location at Disney. Don't try to figure this stuff out. It's everywhere)
    3. Posting previously taken pictures to social media, which can include, but is not limited to: Facebook, Insta, Twitter, etc.
    Bonus #4. Texting someone to tell them how AWESOME their Disney vacation is (and go check my Insta, you'll see it's just FAB!)
    Bonus Extra #5. Old grumpy people like me, looking for where they hid the Starbucks in *this* #$%& theme park - it's supposed to be RIGHT HERE but it says "Main Street Bakery"! and/or desperate mothers with potty-training toddlers looking for the closest bathroom.

    There are SO MANY people - like me, for example - who have to use mobility devices at WDW every.single.day. Not kidding; there are literally thousands of people at any given time at WDW who are using some form of assistive device. That can range from prescription eyeglasses, to hearing aids, to crutches, a Rollator, a scooter, a manual wheelchair, an electric wheelchair or even a "stroller as a wheelchair" tag that WDW has for the littlest nuggets who need some extra help.

    In every case, those are just tools to help those people see better, or hear better, or move better. Nothing else. It's no different than using a calculator to do math, or a hammer to pound in a nail. The tool has a job, and when you use the tool, the job gets done, and usually better and safer than if you didn't use the tool.

    I'm going to leave you (and him) with this last thought. He can refuse to use a (for example) scooter because of his "pride", or he can suck it up, and use it, and guess what - the world won't end, and no one will care, and you won't see anyone you know who will say "OMG LOOK THERES OL GEORGE AND HES ON A DANG SCOOTER" (Because the chance of running into someone you know at WDW is slim to none, and Slim just left town) and this really cool thing will happen: Because he doesn't hurt as much, you will *both* have a better trip. He won't lie awake all night at the hotel in pain, dreading the next day. He will be able to keep up with you - and you may find yourself struggling to keep up with him!

    Or, he can refuse to use the tools that are available to him, and he can cause himself more pain - and he can cost both of you a relaxed and happy vacation.

    I hope - for his sake, and yours - that he can swallow his pride.
     
  15. gap2368

    gap2368 DIS Veteran

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    OP another thing to think about is that some rides have preshow where you will stand in one spot for x amount of time ( and sometimes you can be held up for a number of reasons)

    he might want to skip the HM and FOP since these two have preshow and they would be things he could do if he had a place to sit
     
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  16. Debbie Jean

    Debbie Jean DIS Veteran

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    Yes, yes, yes!

    Every time I hear someone invoke "pride" as a reason not to use an appropriate assistance device, I just cringe. Maybe it's just me, but I don't see this as pride... I see it as selfishness. The cost is paid by everyone else because one persons feelings are more important.

    The irony is that so often once a person uses a scooter, they wonder themselves what the big deal is and love the freedom and relief it brings.

    I also hope you can convince DH to take one for the team and get the scooter... believe it or not, I think, in the end he will be glad he did!
     
  17. disneyseniors

    disneyseniors DIS Veteran

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    OP, my husband was the same way too. However, I did convince him, finally, to try an ECV while at Epcot because of the huge amount of walking involved. He did it reluctantly. But he did it. He was amazed at just how much more he could appreciate the parks, how much better he felt after a long day, and how much happier I was that I didn't have to worry about him. Since then, he will use the ECV, but not every day. We rent on a daily basis at the park, if he wants one. This might be an option for your husband to try it. My husband still won't order one for the entire time and refuses to use one on the buses because he doesn't want to "inconvenience anyone who has to wait". But I am happy that he will rent one in the parks. So don't give up hope, and I know what you are going through.:)
     
  18. Staren

    Staren Mouseketeer

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    Believe me, I know where your DH is at. I was born with my disability, but I refused to use any kind of mobility device until I was 17. I caused myself a lot of unnecessary pain and skipped out on a lot events because I cared what I might look like. I was a lot happier once I was able to get over that. It did take time though.
     
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  19. Queen of the WDW Scene

    Queen of the WDW Scene DIS Veteran

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    I think it's a bit different when you're a kid that is just trying to fit in vs a grown man that won't swallow his pride.
     
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  20. Staren

    Staren Mouseketeer

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    Honestly, I don’t think the emotional journey you go through is all that different. I think it’s similar to the stages of grief. Something that most people will move through. Those born with a disability just go through it younger.
     
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  21. Queen of the WDW Scene

    Queen of the WDW Scene DIS Veteran

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    I myself was born with a life long disability so I know about it. But those that can't adapt even just for the enjoyment of their vacation baffle me.
     
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