Worried about using the Galloway Training schedule to run the half

JenniferYoung44

Mouseketeer
Joined
Jan 24, 2018
So I’m having some concerns about the half marathon training schedule by Jeff Galloway that is on the runDisney site. So far I’ve been using his run/walk method and it is working well for me. I just ran my first 10k last weekend. But what concerns me is literally every other beginner training schedule I have come across recommends significantly more weekly mileage than his, which only calls for 2 30 min weekday runs and one long run. I’ve compared below A. Galloway to two other schedules B and C that are typical of what I’m seeing. For me a 30min run is ~2.5mi for 5 miles during the week. Adding those to the long run you can see there is significantly less total weekly miles in the Galloway plan compared to the others. Am I going to need those miles? Why do most other plans recommend so many more miles if they’re NOT needed?
 

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RunningGamer

Mouse Commando
Joined
Aug 23, 2019
It's really all dependent on your current ability, your goals, and how much time you are able to commit to running on a weekly basis. Remember, any exercise plans are more guides than set instructions, especially for these more generic plans since they can't really take into account your activity history or how you are progressing. Sometimes what one program might consider "for beginners" could be the "experienced/expert" plan for another program, and the plan that works for the former track star that hasn't run in five years may not work for someone who had never thought they could or would be a runner.

If the Galloway plan is working for you, great! No need to switch things up unless you really want to try something else, especially given that you have results from your 10k that prove the plan suits you right now. However, that doesn't mean you can't make the plan your own too. Still feeling great and like you could keep going after that 30 minute mark? Why not keep going? Another 5 minutes, or another 10 minutes, etc. Have another day where you've run 10 minutes and it feels like you've been going for 50? Dig a little deeper, put on that guilty pleasure song, slow down, or whatever works for you to make sure you at least hit that 30 minutes even if you have to completely walk that last 20. You might consider viewing the plan as your minimum goal for the week if you want to try doing more. Adaption and listening to your body is key for any training since the ultimate goal is to finish the race, and hopefully keep the balloon ladies at least at arms length away.
 
  • Sleepless Knight

    Jedi Knight Seeking His Jedi Princess
    Joined
    May 15, 2008
    Adding those to the long run you can see there is significantly less total weekly miles in the Galloway plan compared to the others. Am I going to need those miles? Why do most other plans recommend so many more miles if they’re NOT needed?
    You've already received some great advice. I hope that my long answer helps add to that. I finished many, many races using the Galloway plans and it took me many years before I even began to understand how and why they worked. I followed them and that was enough. But once I began to understand the how and why the plan worked, I began to really grow as a runner and learned how to deal with roadblocks in training.

    One thing I've learned in running is that each person has a different methodology for their plan. For instance, a runner who gets all the proscribed long runs in on the Galloway plan will go 14 miles for the longest run two weeks before the half. Since the half is 13.1 miles, then Galloway's plan followed well has you already knowing that you can go the distance or pretty close to it come race day.

    So while I am not qualified to explain the methodology behind other plans, I can also say that following Galloway's plans will work. It carried me to successful finishes in the 2011 Disneyland Half, 2012 Disneyland Half, 2012 Wine & Dine Half Marathon, 2015 Star Wars Rebel Challenge (10K and Half Marathon on back to back days), 2016 Star Wars Rebel Challenge, 2017 Star Wars Rebel Challenge, 2017 Star Wars Dark Side Challenge which came just days after I had been working 12 hour days for 2 consecutive weeks on the heels of 10 hour days for 2 consecutive months. I used Galloway principles to craft my own training plan for Avengers 2017 Half Marathon since I had less than optimum time between starting to train and the race itself, and went back to the Galloway plan for the 2018 Star Wars Dark Side Challenge plus the 5K thrown in to boot, which was also ran in similar conditions to the 2017 Dark Side Challenge.

    I've listened to him speak a few times at runDisney Expos and heard him interviewed on podcasts as well. He is a former U.S. Olympic team runner so he knows his stuff. I will do my best to explain his ideas.

    1. The key to any training plan is the long run. It helps you build up your endurance to the new distance. However too much running, too soon can lead to injury. This is why Galloway generally builds up to the long run by adding 1.5 miles to the previous long run distance. The buildup is gradual enough to get you to the distance without trying to do too much too soon.

    2. The ability to build up to the long run distance lies in doing the maintenance runs twice a week. Generally you maintain your previous long run fitness level for 2-3 weeks without increasing distance. If memory serves, the Galloway plan usually has 2 maintenance runs of 30-45 minutes on Tuesday/Thursday and a long run of x number of miles on Saturday. Near the end of the plan, I think you would do 12.5 miles 4 weeks before the race, 4 miles (if I'm remembering correctly) 3 weeks before the race, and 14 miles 2 weeks before the race. Doing the 2 30-45 minute runs during the week and the weekend run will help you maintain the fitness necessary to build up to the race distance.

    If a runner trains too much, then that will negatively impact their performance on race day. A runner may head into a race with an overuse injury and may turn a small injury into a much bigger one. This is why race plans have a taper period where the number of miles being ran tends to drop quite a bit during the last 2-3 weeks before a race. This does not hurt race performance because it allows the body to heal, rest, recover, and be hopefully fully healthy on race day itself.

    I believe that Galloway seeks to reduce overuse injury by keeping miles low and allowing for days off between runs.

    I hope this has helped you. Before my very first race ever at Disneyland, I just wanted to finish. That was all I cared about. I chose the Galloway plan because he was a former U.S. Olympian who had completed hundreds of races and guided many runners to successfully completing their races following his methodology. It also helped that the plan was free as opposed to buying a book telling me how to do it and it offered a path that I could comprehend.

    Well, I followed that first plan very imperfectly. I slacked off early in training, skipped a few runs, skipped even more weekend long runs, and about 3 months before the race, realized I had better start taking this seriously. I had to modify the plan and cut out all the short weekend runs in order to get all the weekend long runs capping at 14 miles 2 weeks before the race. I had no idea what I was doing and was truly terrified that I would not finish. Well I got through all of those long runs, even the 14 mile one. And I still didn't believe I would do it.

    Race day came and I allowed my fears of failure get the best of me. I started the race much too fast and less than half a mile in I felt like I had shin splints. I knew I could not go another a few feet in this kind of pain, let 13 miles so I slowed down to an acceptable pace that I could handle. I decided I would go at the acceptable pace until I either finished the race or got swept. If I was going to fail, I would fail on my terms. I would fail because I was not good enough as opposed to didn't even try.

    So I just kept putting one foot in front of the other. Slowly, but surely the mile markers kept showing higher numbers. Still nobody warning me that I was about to be swept. And like many others before me, I eventually crossed that finish line. The Galloway plan really does work. Just put in the time and effort necessary and above all else, trust your training.

    The day after my first half marathon, I saw other runners who had completed the Goofy challenge that year at Disney World. I could not fathom how in the world they ran a marathon the day after running a half given how exhausted and sore I still felt. I literally believed that doing the marathon was impossible for me. Yet this year, I successfully finished the Dopey Challenge as part of my first marathon.

    In the years since that day, I have accomplished many "impossible" things as a runner. Or rather I have accomplished many things that I once believed were completely impossible on that day. And they all started with following the Galloway plan. It works.
     

    bumbershoot

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Mar 5, 2007
    For instance, a runner who gets all the proscribed long runs in on the Galloway plan will go 14 miles for the longest run two weeks before the half. Since the half is 13.1 miles, then Galloway's plan followed well has you already knowing that you can go the distance or pretty close to it come race day.
    Yes. Absolutely. Knowing you’ve done more than that distance is amazing.


    When I DO the Galloway training, I am successful on race day. When I slack off, I still finish but I feel worse. I have now done enough events to know I will finish. But doing the training makes me feel better.
     

    quandrea

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jun 24, 2010
    I will add that I never do the entire training program. My daughter is an elite athlete swimmer and her coach trains her for her races. He never has her run the full distance. He says you save that final bit for race day. I follow his advice on that and it works.
     

    AFwifelife

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Dec 11, 2014
    Whatever plan you use, you have to believe in it. Some need to go the full distance to feel confident, some know that as long as they went X distance, they can complete the race. Galloway works well for so many because it ties in nicely with a traditional work week and isn’t daunting with the walk-run method.
     
  • Sleepless Knight

    Jedi Knight Seeking His Jedi Princess
    Joined
    May 15, 2008
    When I DO the Galloway training, I am successful on race day. When I slack off, I still finish but I feel worse. I have now done enough events to know I will finish. But doing the training makes me feel better.
    Mental confidence is an overlooked part of success in running however you want to define that. And you can give yourself a mental boost by putting in the training. I also feel that putting in the training can help you recover quicker after the race.
    Whatever plan you use, you have to believe in it. Some need to go the full distance to feel confident, some know that as long as they went X distance, they can complete the race.
    Agree. Sometimes believing in a plan, especially a new plan you've never tried before comes down to trusting that it will help you achieve your goals when you've put the work in beforehand to succeed.
    Galloway works well for so many because it ties in nicely with a traditional work week and isn’t daunting with the walk-run method.
    I think part of committing to the plan is liking the plan. Meaning that it works with your life. And I definitely agree that the Galloway plan and/or run-walk-run provides a challenging yet achievable path to finishing.

    Training for and running a half marathon definitely challenges and tests you. Putting in the work to do it leads to success.
     

    ZellyB

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Sep 18, 2010
    Galloway's basic plan is designed to get you across the finish line upright and in reasonably good shape. It's a minimalist plan in my opinion with the emphasis on the long run. Other plans have different methods that also work. Basically pretty much all the well known plans work and it's just a matter of what works for you and then sticking with it. I've used Galloway plans for years and they will work if you follow it and believe in it.
     

    KaitlynJ

    Officially a marathoner!
    Joined
    Jul 23, 2018
    Galloway's basic plan is designed to get you across the finish line upright and in reasonably good shape. It's a minimalist plan in my opinion with the emphasis on the long run. Other plans have different methods that also work. Basically pretty much all the well known plans work and it's just a matter of what works for you and then sticking with it. I've used Galloway plans for years and they will work if you follow it and believe in it.
    I totally agree with this. If you pick a program that fits your schedule and ability level (and stick with it), I think that all of the major training plans (Galloway, Hal Higdon, Hanson, etc.) will adequately prepare you to finish the race. Most important is picking something realistic for your schedule. I love the concept behind Hanson's, but with my schedule I know I can't reasonably commit to working out 1+ hours 6 days a week. So I picked a Runner's World plan that only has four workouts per week (occasionally I've only had time to do 3 of them, but have gotten all of the long runs done, which is obviously the most important).
     

    momandmousefan

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    Mar 25, 2016
    I'm running into similar doubts, as I've gone with a heart rate based training program for the first time. I was always used to having mile based goals, but now it's a set amount of time within a certain heart rate zone. There's still intervals, long runs, easy runs, etc... but it seems like I'm putting less miles down than I'm used to for now.
    So far, it's a lot more FUN of a program though. lol Running in a Zone 2/3 is a lot easier than a zone 4/5...but you sure don't cover as much ground to start that way.
     
  • DopeyBadger

    Imagathoner
    Joined
    Oct 15, 2015
    Am I going to need those miles? Why do most other plans recommend so many more miles if they’re NOT needed?
    In my view, there are probably two very important factors when deciding between training plans.

    1) Which plan can you commit to nearly 100% throughout the entire plan without making edits or changes? The one with the least # of edits is likely to yield the better result. The original writer of the training plan had a reason for everything they put in the plan. By you removing or changing things, you're changing the intent. Outside of knowing the writer or reading a book by the writer that explains each specific workout, you may be altering the effectiveness of the training plan as a whole. So I always advise to choose the training plan you feel at the beginning you can commit to the most all the way to the end.

    For example, say if I've got two runners of equal fitness. On a very basic level, let's say one chooses a 5 day plan with 2 hard workouts and the other chooses a 4 day plan with 1 hard workout. Both plans are written to be progressive as the plan continues such that on race day the intent is to be in peak physical shape.

    The first runner is mostly successful to start managing to squeeze everything in, but as the plan progresses into the second half life gets in the way for whatever reason and they start having to drop workouts.

    The second runner (4 day a week) completes the plan nearly to perfection along the way.

    They both end up doing mostly 4 day weeks towards the end. But the first runner decides to drop the "easy" days because the hard/long runs are "what matters". What runner A doesn't realize is that dropping the "easy" day now shifts their training plan from mostly easy into somewhat mostly hard. The body is going to adapt much differently to this. More "survive the training" rather than "thrive because of the training" because the body isn't getting the necessary stimulus to handle the original workouts scheduled. The first runner (5 days) is also likely to stagnate in their training/improvement because the plan is no longer progressive. What they were doing early on in 5 day a week workouts becomes somewhat similar in training load calculations to what they're trying to do in 4 days. The second runner which followed their plan more closely is much more likely to see a better result on race day even though they may have done slightly less overall training. I've seen this scenario play out plenty of times.

    2) Once you know which plan you can maximally commit to, outside of injuries and overtraining, the one that has more training is more likely to yield a better result. That doesn't necessarily mean the one that goes to 14 mile LRs is better. Because the training plan is so much more than the long runs. The training load of the totality of the plan will dictate the results gained. But we don't live in a world "outside of injuries and overtraining". So choose the plan that's a step up from what you've been doing, but not a leap. If you've been training at 3 days and 2.5 hrs per week, then you don't want to choose the plan that starts at 6 days and 6 hrs per week. If you find your body is tolerating 3 days, then look for a plan with 4 days (that still fits your life schedule with as little edits as possible) and try that one. If 5 days is working, then look for a 6 day plan. It's once you start to have injuries or overtraining even when properly following the plan (and that's a key part), then you know you've reached your limit and need to find other avenues for increasing performance.

    So to answer the question, why do some plans have more miles than others? Because in the absence of injuries and overtraining, the plan with more miles has a higher likelihood of increasing performance. As long as the higher mileage plan is appropriate for your fitness and what you've done in the past, then those "extra" miles will be beneficial.

    For me a 30min run is ~2.5mi for 5 miles during the week.
    So if following the Galloway plan, then that means your easy/long run pace is a 12 min/mile (2.5 miles in 30 min). For someone doing a 12 min/mile easy maintenance pace, they have a marathon pace (or race equivalent) of a 10 min/mile (Galloway uses MP (or sometimes HMP) + 2 minutes). The following is the fitness profile of someone with a 10 min/mile M equivalent:

    Screen Shot 2019-09-25 at 3.55.17 PM.png

    So the question then would be, did you recently run the 10k in roughly 57 min? If not, then it's possible you may be doing your easy maintenance days a bit too fast. One of the hallmarks of the Galloway plan (and many other training plans) is the mindset of "Train slow to race fast". When one gets in a pattern of training too fast for their current fitness level it usually ends up in a stagnation or stalling of improvement. In many cases, when the same runner starts training slower, they suddenly find themselves racing much faster. And they find training in general more enjoyable because it's not always so hard every day. You finish tons of workouts feeling like you barely even did anything. Yet when race day comes, you are able to perform to expectations.

    Hope this helps!
     

    Sleepless Knight

    Jedi Knight Seeking His Jedi Princess
    Joined
    May 15, 2008
    I totally agree with this. If you pick a program that fits your schedule and ability level (and stick with it), I think that all of the major training plans (Galloway, Hal Higdon, Hanson, etc.) will adequately prepare you to finish the race. Most important is picking something realistic for your schedule.
    Absolutely. Before I could commit myself to the marathon, I knew that I either had to make peace with multiple 5-6 hour long runs under the Galloway plan or find a plan that would get me enough miles to finish without multiple 5-6 hour long runs. @DopyeyBadger helped me better understand how such a plan could and would work, but it still required me to put the work and to trust it. Since he designed my plan, he built a plan that had me spreading out the miles necessary over 5 days with long runs, but not 5-6 hour long runs on Saturdays. The plan worked. I finished the marathon and was even able to well exceed my goal of one character photo during the race.
    What runner A doesn't realize is that dropping the "easy" day now shifts their training plan from mostly easy into somewhat mostly hard. The body is going to adapt much differently to this. More "survive the training" rather than "thrive because of the training" because the body isn't getting the necessary stimulus to handle the original workouts scheduled. The first runner (5 days) is also likely to stagnate in their training/improvement because the plan is no longer progressive. What they were doing early on in 5 day a week workouts becomes somewhat similar in training load calculations to what they're trying to do in 4 days.
    I did exactly this before my first race. I was lazy and skipped a lot of easy runs for the first 4-6 weeks of the plan. Then I had to cut out all the easy runs in order to fit all the long runs in before race day. I did this and while it was sufficient to finish on race day, it also helped contribute to a rough first race experience. I actually enjoy the training more and have had far more successful races when I have "easy" runs. I think an overlooked benefit of easy runs is that they help us to recover without compromising the gains we have made.
    In many cases, when the same runner starts training slower, they suddenly find themselves racing much faster. And they find training in general more enjoyable because it's not always so hard every day. You finish tons of workouts feeling like you barely even did anything. Yet when race day comes, you are able to perform to expectations.
    This is exactly what I experienced during the Giant Race this month. In part because I lost an entire month of running due to a nasty summer cold right as I was beginning to get back into things, you designed my plan as slow and easy to get me in good enough shape to finish the race and be on track for Dopey in a few months. I trained at an average 16 minute mile pace on every run for a race with a required minimum pace of 15 minutes per mile. My longest long run was 8 miles and all my maintenance runs were 2.5 miles. I took race day very conservatively and repeatedly opted not to push myself in part to remain injury free given that I had trained slowly. Even then, I still took almost 3 minutes off of my PR set a year earlier and actually ran 2-3 minutes faster than what I had trained at. I think it helped immensely that I went into race day feeling fresh and ready. And I finished that race to go and walk the 5K with my dad having no issues at all in terms of soreness, exhaustion, et all.

    Well designed training plans will work when followed. They are probably never followed perfectly, but when we put real effort into getting almost all the runs in, we will succeed. I followed my Dopey plan really well until getting a bad cold 1 1/2 weeks before the race. I could barely stand up some days, let alone run. But I started to get better fairly quickly and knew I was in good shape for the marathon when I finished the half knowing that I had a lot left in my tank for the next day. Sure enough I had plenty in the tank for the marathon.
     

    JenniferYoung44

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    Jan 24, 2018
    DopeyBadger a few things:
    Based on above answer to number 1 is Galloway is what I have the most time in my daily life for and 2. I’m prone to overuse injuries so Galloways probably best there too. I definitely think I need to pay closer attention to what I’m supposed to be doing though because I wasn’t doing easy 30 minute runs. My 10k time last weekend was 1h 19min which was a tad slow for me cause I was really sick. But my pace in general in around 12:30. 13-14 to start, 11:30-12 once in a groove and I just always run at that wether a short or long run. Every week I add a few seconds to my run interval and knock a few off my walk. Right now I’m at 1:10 run/30s walk. I don’t think I can physically run any slower than I already do, it’s slow. So does that mean on “easy“ runs I take longer walk breaks?
     

    DopeyBadger

    Imagathoner
    Joined
    Oct 15, 2015
    Based on above answer to number 1 is Galloway is what I have the most time in my daily life for
    And that's the 2 weekdays at a limit of 30 min, and a single weekend day at whatever is called for? How about the 10k/Challenge Galloway plan which is 30-45 min on 3 weekdays and has a double weekend (Sat/Sun) every other weekend at the end of the plan?

    2. I’m prone to overuse injuries so Galloways probably best there too.
    What overuse injuries have you had? What leads you to believe you are prone to these injuries? What training were you doing when they occurred?

    My 10k time last weekend was 1h 19min which was a tad slow for me cause I was really sick.
    So you think maybe a 1:10 or 1:15 10k is more reasonable for an assessment of current fitness? I'd come up with the following for each. I'll use an 18 min/mile walking pace since that's an average "comfortable walk pace" and remember per Galloway it's not a "walk with purpose" but an easy walk like a stroll between intervals.

    A 1:19 10k runner.

    Screen Shot 2019-09-26 at 6.41.39 AM.png

    A 1:15 10k runner.

    Screen Shot 2019-09-26 at 6.41.52 AM.png

    A 1:10 10k runner.

    Screen Shot 2019-09-26 at 6.42.08 AM.png

    These aren't necessarily the paces you "hope" to achieve, but rather have already achieved. Since training where you are, and not where you want to be leads to the best long term outcome in running performance. So if you're a 1:10 10k runner, then you've already likely beaten a 33:30 5k per my calculations. If not, then a 1:10 10k is an unlikely current fitness assessment.

    I don’t think I can physically run any slower than I already do, it’s slow. So does that mean on “easy“ runs I take longer walk breaks?
    I've worked with nearly 200 different runners over the years now. All across the range of performance from the BQ runner to the person who finishes last in most of their races. And without a doubt the #1 response I get from 99% of runners is, "I can't possibly run any slower than I already am." My response is always, give it a try for 3-5 weeks. After about 3-5 weeks of actively trying to run slower, nearly 95% of runners can. It's just something new and the body has to relearn what truly easy paces are. There are always a handful that after 3-5 weeks struggle to go as slow as I ask them to, but in those cases we still have a few tricks to try.

    So does that mean on “easy“ runs I take longer walk breaks?
    Ideally no, we want to avoid that as much as possible. There are 4 variables in run/walking. The run pace, walk pace, run duration, and walk duration. The walk pace is fixed for a single person based on their natural comfortable walking pace. Physiologically speaking the pace at which you run and how you long hold it is relevant. So when someone extends their walking duration beyond 30 seconds they have to "make up" the time by running faster or for longer. In both these cases, it probably is going to change the bodies response to an "easy" run because the pace at which you run or how long you hold it for is no longer going to be perceived as easy by your body. So I do my best not to change the duration of the walk in run/walk.
     

    JenniferYoung44

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    Jan 24, 2018
    How about the 10k/Challenge Galloway plan which is 30-45 min on 3 weekdays and has a double weekend (Sat/Sun) every other weekend at the end of the plan?
    Havent seen this one anywhere, but with kids I think the 2 weekdays and one long run on the weekend is the one that will require the least "edits"

    What overuse injuries have you had? What leads you to believe you are prone to these injuries? What training were you doing when they occurred?
    Dear Lord, how much time do you have? I have scoliosis and maybe something genetically screwy with my tendons, though nothing that can be tested for. Rheumatologist has looked at literally everything....
    Tennis elbow (both elbows)- From carrying babies. Anything and everything aggravates these
    Carpal Tunnel (both) - Life (surgical repair done)
    Shoulder bursitis- moderate lifting and TRX
    Sciatica (both)- Anytime i have to sit for long periods
    SI joint dysfunction and piriformis syndrome- Lifting, TRX, Running
    Psoas muscle contracture/scarring-ab workouts in the army
    Runners Knee (L greater than R) - running, lifting, TRX
    Left Patellar tendonitis- Running, TRX
    Anterior shin splints (both)- Running
    Achilles Tendonitis (L)- Running
    Calf strain/sprain (L)-running
    ITB pain (both)-running
    Left foot extensor tendonitis- Running
    Assorted other random neck, back, wrist and ankle injuries over the years

    At the moment (knock on wood) all of these are good (L patellar tendonitis flares after long runs but resides withing 48h), but I have to be super careful, run in compression gear, and KT tape anything the second it starts to hurt.

    A 1:15 10k runner.

    Screen Shot 2019-09-26 at 6.41.52 AM.png
    I would say this is the most accurate reflection of my current fitness level.

    I've worked with nearly 200 different runners over the years now. All across the range of performance from the BQ runner to the person who finishes last in most of their races. And without a doubt the #1 response I get from 99% of runners is, "I can't possibly run any slower than I already am." My response is always, give it a try for 3-5 weeks. After about 3-5 weeks of actively trying to run slower, nearly 95% of runners can. It's just something new and the body has to relearn what truly easy paces are. There are always a handful that after 3-5 weeks struggle to go as slow as I ask them to, but in those cases we still have a few tricks to try.
    I will give this a try. I have to admit, the rational part of my mind really doesnt believe that if I practice at a 15:10 pace I will all the sudden be able to run 2 and a half minutes faster in the race. That said, I am a total running noob and am willing to put my faith in people who are not.
     
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    Kerry1957

    Will run for Hefeweizen
    Joined
    Oct 7, 2017
    I will give this a try. I have to admit, the rational part of my mind really doesnt believe that if I practice at a 15:10 pace I will all the sudden be able to run 2 and a half minutes faster in the race. That said, I am a total running noob and am willing to put my faith in people who are not.
    Although it does seem a bit counter intuitive, the train slow to race fast(er) does work, even for, or perhaps especially for, we slower runners. I used a @DopeyBadger training plan earlier this year to prep for a half marathon. The majority of my training runs were at an overall 14:10 pace, running for 90 seconds and walking for 30 seconds. My walk was more of a power walk than a stroll. I did have later in my plan some runs or portions of runs at my projected HM tempo so the race pace was not an "all the sudden" thing.

    For the HM I ran a very consistent overall 11:30 pace running 90 second / 30 second intervals. It was my 12th HM and a new PR of just over 2 hours and 30 minutes. I finished tired, but comfortable, and felt I could have pushed it even a bit more.

    Edit: My @DopeyBadger plan was 4 days a week, MWFSa, Compared to Galloway, I ran more miles during the week and fewer for the weekend long run. Since I ran on Fridays, my longer run on Saturday gave me the additional pleasure? of running on tired legs.
     
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    AFwifelife

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Dec 11, 2014
    I’m another dopeybadger runner. First time I opened my plan I could only laugh when he estimated my finish times for Marathon Weekend. My weekly averages hang around 11:50-12ish range but I had no problem running a 10:43 average for a 2:22 half PR (I took the other events leisurely for the most part). Like I said before, it takes a lot of faith and positivity but it’s possible. I also had zero injuries last race season and very few aches and pains/soreness. I was only sore after the full because we ended up walking more than I trained for (I’m a continuous runner). But even with that soreness, we were still at Epcot the next morning.
     

    DopeyBadger

    Imagathoner
    Joined
    Oct 15, 2015
    Havent seen this one anywhere, but with kids I think the 2 weekdays and one long run on the weekend is the one that will require the least "edits"
    It's on the runDisney website under "Training". But it sounds like the classic HM plan is a better fit given the explanation above. So I'd focus on completing that one as close to 100% as you can.

    SI joint dysfunction and piriformis syndrome- Lifting, TRX, Running
    Psoas muscle contracture/scarring-ab workouts in the army
    Runners Knee (L greater than R) - running, lifting, TRX
    Left Patellar tendonitis- Running, TRX
    Anterior shin splints (both)- Running
    Achilles Tendonitis (L)- Running
    Calf strain/sprain (L)-running
    ITB pain (both)-running
    Left foot extensor tendonitis- Running
    So I'll be interested to see how many of these injuries reoccur when you slow down your pace in training. The slowing of the pace should allow your body to follow the pattern of: stimulus (running) -> recovery -> adaptation. It's when we train too hard too often that we get stuck in: stimulus (running) -> recovery; with no chance for the body to enter the adaptation portion. And adaptations can occur with easy truly running or rest. It's one of the reasons elite runners can consistently do a schedule of 90 min morning easy runs + 45 min evening runs. They're just manipulating the bodies "recovery" duration and to be sure to still hit the adaptation portion the easy days have to be really really easy.

    I would say this is the most accurate reflection of my current fitness level.
    Alright, so for a 10k of 1:15 to be the best assessment of current fitness you have to have recently completed (or reasonably believe you could complete) a 5k in about 36 min or a Magic Mile in about 10:26. Still the case?

    Also, let me know if the 18 min/mile walking pace doesn't seem reasonable for your comfortable walking pace. Because I can change that in the calculator to give you adjusted goal intervals to play with. The ones above are a very good starting point, but there have been a few cases where myself and the runner needed to tweak them to get them to work for an individual.

    I will give this a try. I have to admit, the rational part of my mind really doesnt believe that if I practice at a 15:10 pace I will all the sudden be able to run 2 and a half minutes faster in the race. That said, I am a total running noob and am willing to put my faith in people who are not.
    It's crazy isn't it. :crazy: It's like a bad informercial where you wash some super product on your car and suddenly your rusted car from the 1980s looks brand new like a 2019 one. Well at least kind of like that.... Almost like a too good to be true. But in reality, if you dive into almost every training plan out there, they all say the same thing. Train slow to race fast. From Higdon, Galloway, Hansons, Pftiz, Daniels and Fitzgerald all have language in their plans that say train slow predominately. Some do a better job of spelling out specific paces and I think that's a key part. Because a lot of people truly don't know what true easy pace feels like. They think they're going easy, but they can go far far easier.

    I used to train by the method of PR the day. I ran fast all the time. Never hit the race times I thought I was capable of. Switched to train slow to race fast and within 18 weeks dropped by marathon PR by about 50 min. There have been races where I've run each and every mile faster than I ever have run any single mile (a 5k comes to mind where each successive mile of the race was a single magic mile PR). Or a HM where I set PRs of 400m, 800m, 1 mile, 5k, 10k, and HM all in the same race. And these didn't come early in my running career. I had well over 4000 career running miles and 3.5 years of running experience when these things suddenly started happening all because I changed my methodology.

    I did have later in my plan some runs or portions of runs at my projected HM tempo so the race pace was not an "all the sudden" thing.
    And if you look at the instructions of the Galloway plan (link) there is language in there that gives some flexibility in trying out race pace. It's just not something you want to do all the time, and it's something that you want to schedule in advance in a progressive nature. So if you limit yourself to 30 min on a weekday, then maybe starting in Week 8 of the 19 week plan on Thursdays you start to add in HM Tempo intervals. At first, maybe 15 min easy + 5 min at HM Tempo intervals + 10 min easy. Then the next week try 10 + 10 + 10. Then maybe work up to 10 + 15 + 5, then 5 + 20 + 5, then 5 + 25. Something like that. But in this case the Tuesdays would always stay at 100% easy.

    Since I ran on Fridays, my longer run on Saturday gave me the additional pleasure? of running on tired legs.
    ::yes::

    The concept of cumulative fatigue. It's an amplifier of training methodology. How the runs on days before/after influence the response you'll get in today's workout.

    I’m another dopeybadger runner. First time I opened my plan I could only laugh when he estimated my finish times for Marathon Weekend. My weekly averages hang around 11:50-12ish range but I had no problem running a 10:43 average for a 2:22 half PR (I took the other events leisurely for the most part). Like I said before, it takes a lot of faith and positivity but it’s possible. I also had zero injuries last race season and very few aches and pains/soreness. I was only sore after the full because we ended up walking more than I trained for (I’m a continuous runner). But even with that soreness, we were still at Epcot the next morning.
    And the experiences of @Kerry1957 and @AFwifelife are not unique. Most everyone finds when they switch to train slow to race fast that training itself is easier, more enjoyable, on race day they're faster, and they recover quicker post-race. It all has to do with the science behind why train slow to race fast works. I've written just over 400 training plans for somewhere just under 200 different runners and I could probably count on my hand the number of times the training methodology didn't work. And in most every one of those cases, it's because the runner really struggled to mentally and physically buy into the methodology itself.
     



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