Wisdom teeth removal = legal and encouraged child abuse?

amberpi

DIS Veteran
Joined
Jul 13, 2012
Oh, to make my story worse, I didn't realize I was allergic to codeine until after the procedure and some outpatient time (just enough to get the infection meds in me, no over night, it sucked but wasn't THAT big of a deal) and I was at home. Throwing your guts up after an extraction were they have to hammer out some of the pieces really sucked. Still not in my top pain related issues. Thank your stars guys, seriously. After that, I went 15 years without any kind of medical issue that wasn't an "accident." I wish I knew how blessed I was then.

I do understand dry sockets are terrible. Hopefully your daughter doesn't have that, OP.

ETA: A lot of my issues could have been prevented if I wasn't a dumb college kid who thought that they were 9 feet tall and bullet proof. When the pain first started I just took aspirin for a couple of weeks thinking it'd go away after putting off the surgery. What a dumb kid I was.
 

smokeyblue

DIS Veteran
Joined
Jan 1, 2009
I'm fairly certain that saying wisdom teeth removal it is sanctioned child abuse was pure hyperbole on the OP's daughter's part. A parent consenting to wisdom tooth removal at the recommendation of a medical professional is not child abuse.
 
  • mjkacmom

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Feb 20, 2006
    If she has dry socket she is not being dramatic.
    I had it once, it was the worst pain I have ever experienced in my life.
    Now, of course there are probably much worse things to go through, but in all my 45 years and having 3 kids I've yet to experience it.
    I doubt she has a dry socket, I had 4 kids and nothing was more painful, I woke up DH in the middle of the night crying. I had it packed at least once a day, I’d be at their front door before they even opened. I depleted my entire opioid supply from previous childbirths. Pitocin induced labor, c/s, painful, dry socket was worse.
     

    neverlandsky

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Sep 7, 2017
    DH had room for his wisdom teeth, yet life happened where he was suppose to get them out at 18 and never did.

    Last year he had them removed at 40. All became rotten on the inside. Due to his age it was a long healing & he had dry socket in 2. Removing wisdom teeth between 16-19 years old is preventive medical & dental care. Your healing time is shorter because your body can regenerate a lot faster vs. 40.

    DH said not taking them out at 16-19 is neglect.
     

    Kitty 34

    Hums in her sleep
    Joined
    Feb 16, 2000
    Stories like this are why we pressured her into the procedure. It was definitely not her first choice.

    I figure I have two years or so before my son is due, plenty of time to forget how much it hurt my daughter.

    Parenting is not simple.
    So you parents are the child abusers!!! ;) :rotfl:
     

    Poohforyou

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Mar 16, 2011
    I think if my 19 year old said that I'd respond that expecting me to pay her tuition is elder abuse :rotfl:.

    Sounds like the OP's daughter had complications. My daughter and a bunch for her friends had there's out before going off to college. A day or two of ibuprofen and mashed potatoes and they were fine.
     
  • mousefan73

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    May 9, 2012
    I thanked my parents for the "abuse".. Best cosmetic surgery ever! The side effect of PERFECT skin due to being on anti-biotics was AMAZING.. Seriously my skin totally cleared up..
     

    ronandannette

    I gave myself this tag and I "Like" myself too!
    Joined
    May 4, 2006
    I doubt she has a dry socket, I had 4 kids and nothing was more painful, I woke up DH in the middle of the night crying. I had it packed at least once a day, I’d be at their front door before they even opened. I depleted my entire opioid supply from previous childbirths. Pitocin induced labor, c/s, painful, dry socket was worse.
    I have to agree. Dentists are extremely detailed in their cautions about dry-socket; she would have have been told and likely had written post-op instructions on how to recognize it and have it treated immediately! If in fact she had it and failed to do so, well...:rolleyes1
     

    Hikergirl

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Feb 28, 2016
    I have to agree. Dentists are extremely detailed in their cautions about dry-socket; she would have have been told and likely had written post-op instructions on how to recognize it and have it treated immediately! If in fact she had it and failed to do so, well...:rolleyes1
    True, but 19 year olds don't always pay close attention to what they are told ;)
    OP, that wasn't a dig at your dd, I have 2 older kids and I know they half hear what is said, and assume they other half :thumbsup2

    My point was that this girl may be in serious pain, and while she was being a bit dramatic with her statement, I don't think it's fair to just brush her experience off as her just being a drama queen.
     
  • dosekies

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Mar 23, 2017
    You never know what is going to happen in any situation. Sure - leave them and see what happens down the road. Then you run the risk of even more painful and costly procedures when they end up causing the rest of your teeth to move around or when they accidentally hit a nerve during removal because it becomes harder to do the older you get. This is FAR from abuse
     

    Tink9721

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jun 14, 2009
    Three of mine were taken out when I was 14 - all impacted. I wish the fourth one would've come out then too, because it started causing issues with my bottom teeth a couple years ago, in my early 20's. And when I bite down, my back molars on the top align with that wisdom tooth so it can't come out without messing those up. I have to wear a retainer on the bottom to keep my bottom teeth from shifting. That tooth is also really hard to brush.

    I also had a gum graft last year, which in my head seems like it was worse than the wisdom tooth extraction, but that's probably just because it's much fresher in my memory.
     

    mnrose

    Queen of all she surveys
    Joined
    Jun 18, 2009
    Three of mine were taken out when I was 14 - all impacted. I wish the fourth one would've come out then too, because it started causing issues with my bottom teeth a couple years ago, in my early 20's. And when I bite down, my back molars on the top align with that wisdom tooth so it can't come out without messing those up. I have to wear a retainer on the bottom to keep my bottom teeth from shifting. That tooth is also really hard to brush.

    I also had a gum graft last year, which in my head seems like it was worse than the wisdom tooth extraction, but that's probably just because it's much fresher in my memory.

    Gum grafting definitely ranks in the top three for bad dental procedures for me. LOL. Extractions make top 5, but not top three. I think root canals are worse. And, sometimes crowns. But that grafting? Yow.
     

    AP1209

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    Apr 28, 2015
    I had all 4 of mine take out a couple of months ago at age 37. I never had any issues but one day I was eating something and one of them cracked. It was not an enjoyable experience but I'm glad I never have to deal with them again.
     

    Tink9721

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jun 14, 2009
    Gum grafting definitely ranks in the top three for bad dental procedures for me. LOL. Extractions make top 5, but not top three. I think root canals are worse. And, sometimes crowns. But that grafting? Yow.
    Yeah the graft was awful. The actual procedure wasn't that bad; I kept my eyes closed and I had no idea he had even cut into my gums yet when he told me the graft was on. Getting stitches in my mouth always freaks me out though. The recovery week was horrible :crazy2:

    I have to have another one, probably later this year :headache:
     

    aprilgail

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Nov 10, 2001
    My whole head xray showed mine growing at an angle towards my other teeth, so they were removed as a teen.
    Not just as a matter of routine
    Same as my daughters- they were growing into the roots of the teeth next to them so if we left them she would have ended up with 8 teeth having to come out instead of 4. I am so glad I did it when she was younger because I had to have it done when I was an adult (20) for the same reason and it sucked worse then because I lost 2 other teeth due to the wisdom teeth growing at an angle and ruining them! I wasn't even aware that they were there since there was no room for them to come in like normal teeth. I don't think many peoples mouths are big enough to handle 4 extra teeth coming in.
     

    mummabear

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    May 2, 2012
    My point was that you can live your live with if you can't afford to have them removed in time. It was not pleasant.
    Sometimes leaving it will make things worse, mine were sideways in my jaw and by the time the dentist referred me to an oral surgeon to have them out I lost another 2 teeth.

    Did she keep ice on it? You HAVE to ice after wisdom tooth extraction, constantly. Otherwise you swell up like a chipmunk storing acorns in their cheeks. It happened to me (I "iced"...for 15 minutes after I got home. but I was a know-it-all 20 year old who thought the ice was uncomfortable so I didn't KEEP doing it as I had been directed). Plus I still wound up with a dry socket.
    I iced mine for days non stop, had this special thing that went under my jaw and velcroed on top of my head and just swapped out gel packs constantly for days and I still swelled like a chipmunk, I couldn't eat solid food for a week, it was agonizing, I was not expecting so much pain.
     

    LongLiveRafiki

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Feb 8, 2017
    I had my tops removed at 21 in the military. It was funny at the time because it was so difficult to get pretty much any medical procedure done, but with wisdom teeth it was authorized immediately, even if it wasn't a medical emergency. They gave 2 days bed rest, but only ever scheduled extractions for Friday afternoons so your time off would coincide with your normal weekend days off.

    At the time, my bottoms weren't even showing up on x-rays. Now, for the last 5 years, one has been coming in painstakingly slow. I wanted to get it out as every few months it does cause pain and there's not enough room for it, but other more pressing dental issues have taken precedence. Since it's broken the surface last year, it has proceeded to have chips break off several times and is now only a thin crescent shell of a tooth. The cost to extract it will be more now as it will shatter when they try to get it out. I have to wait for a referral to even know how much that's going to set me back, but definitely more than the couple hundred it would have been a couple years ago.
     

    Summer2018

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jun 29, 2017
    A bacterial infection, Pericoronitis, can develop if they are not removed in some cases. Left untreated, it could be very dangerous.

    All 4 of mine were impacted, so they were removed when I was 19. It was not only a horrible experience, I had to pay for it because my insurance didn’t cover it. As unpleasant as that experience was, the alternative would have been much worse.
     

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