Will you fly on a Boeing 737 Max 8?

Discussion in 'Community Board' started by Sandeep1, Mar 12, 2019.

?

Will you fly on a Boeing 737 Max 8?

  1. Yes

    37 vote(s)
    32.5%
  2. No

    53 vote(s)
    46.5%
  3. Not Sure

    24 vote(s)
    21.1%
  1. kdonnel

    kdonnel DVC-BCV

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2001
    Messages:
    1,687
    It is not a matter of the USA losing credibility. It is a matter of the rest of the world also adopting best practices for aviation disaster investigation.

    Best practices are best practices. It does not matter what country you represent as an investigator, just that you follow industry agreed upon best practices.
     
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2019 at 6:13 PM
    DopeyDame and china mom like this.
  2. LSUmiss

    LSUmiss DIS Veteran

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2014
    Messages:
    3,101
    So they did gather enough data now including Boeing themselves suggesting they be grounded BEFORE today’s decision. So here’s the thing, all of those flights were possibly at risk while they debated. Other countries thought the risk wasn’t worth it, but we decided to wait for more evidence. I find that disturbing. Imo you ground them until there’s evidence that they’re definitely safe not the opposite.
     
  3. Avatar

    Advertisement


  4. LSUmiss

    LSUmiss DIS Veteran

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2014
    Messages:
    3,101
    Boeing even suggested grounding. Imo it’s all about $$ & calculating the financial risks & liability.
     
  5. kdonnel

    kdonnel DVC-BCV

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2001
    Messages:
    1,687
    I find it refreshing that a knee jerk decision was not made but instead cooler heads prevailed and a decision was made after evidence was gathered and analyzed. Much like our criminal justice system should work. Much like any system should work.
     
  6. LSUmiss

    LSUmiss DIS Veteran

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2014
    Messages:
    3,101
    I don’t think it is. I think ppl are paranoid it is or use it as an excuse when they don’t like something. But I do think everything is about $$.
     
    CSPhysio likes this.
  7. LSUmiss

    LSUmiss DIS Veteran

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2014
    Messages:
    3,101
    I don’t think the 157 dead passengers on the ethopian flight would find that refreshing. When human life is at stake, companies should err on the side of caution always.
     
  8. nd5056

    nd5056 DIS Veteran

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2008
    Messages:
    1,301
    No, I would not fly this plane, based on the article below:


    What if the system was locked out and the pilots could not disable it? Now more:

    https://abc7chicago.com/ethiopia-crash-uk-authorities-ground-boeing-737-max-8/5182971/
     
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2019 at 6:31 PM
  9. kdonnel

    kdonnel DVC-BCV

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2001
    Messages:
    1,687
    There is no system on a plane that can not be disabled by the pilots by pulling a circuit breaker.

    Ultimately the pilots flying the two crashed planes are at fault if it turns out turning off MCAS was the procedure needed to prevent the crashes as long as that procedure was properly documented in the operation manual provided by the plane manufacturer.

    If it is in the manual from Boeing and was not part of the Lion Air or Ethiopian Air training for their pilots, those training departments are to blame as are the regulatory agencies that signed off on the training program for the airlines.

    If Boeing neglected to mention it, well then Boeing and the FAA, CAA, and EASA are all fault for issuing an air worthiness directive for an airplane type that did not provide proper documentation to the purchaser.

    With properly trained pilots I would not hesitate to fly this plane.

    There is so much automation in the cockpit that pilots have to know to turn off in the case of malfunctions, MCAS is not the exception.
     
    GoofyPrincess likes this.
  10. nd5056

    nd5056 DIS Veteran

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2008
    Messages:
    1,301
    I don't have your knowledge, but whatever you wrote makes sense. But, what the pilots can do in case of a total system failure?

    The last crash accident witnesses mentioned a black smoke coming out of the tail when the plane was going down, where did that come from? Many modern cars catch on fire suddenly, like BMW's lately?
     
  11. DLgal

    DLgal DIS Veteran

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2013
    Messages:
    5,968
    An Ethiopian Airlines spokesman said that they were aware of the MCAS override protocol and their pilots had all completed the required training to handle such an event.

    I will not accept that these two accidents were a coincidence, based on the similar circumstances of them. My gut feeling is that the system is engaging and for some reason, NOT disengaging when the pilots attempt to override it. When a plane has just taken off, there isn't a whole lot of time or altitude to fix a nosedive. You have seconds, a minute at best, when a plane is going over 400mph and has barely cleared 10000 feet.

    The pilots communicated that they were having "flight control problems," meaning the plane was NOT responding to pilot inputs. They asked for and received clearance to return to the airport, but could not maintain control of the plane.

    The Lion Air crash has been blamed, preliminarily, on a "faulty airspeed indicator."

    Something is wrong with this plane model and it needs a fix or they need to scrap it altogether. The fact that Boeing ADMITTED the Max 8's have faulty sensors that may produce erroneous data, which can trigger an automated system to engage in an unnecessary and catastrophic maneuver, seems criminal. They should have issued a fix for the faulty sensors, not created some workaround.
     
  12. capegirl

    capegirl DIS Veteran

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2003
    Messages:
    1,927
    If this plane was safe, it would not suddenly go into a nose dive. This is not normal, and something is very wrong. I would never be comfortable flying on this plane even with a pilot who was properly trained.
     
  13. msb578

    msb578 DIS Veteran

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2012
    Messages:
    1,727
    How has Southwest had ~31,000 successful flights on this aircraft (according to themselves)? Was it just going to be a matter of time for them?
     
  14. MillauFr

    MillauFr Buzz & Woody

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2011
    Messages:
    4,712
    40,000 people died in car accidents in the US last year. I did stop driving so much and gave up my car 18 years ago. They are too dangerous.
     
  15. Sandeep1

    Sandeep1 Mouseketeer

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2018
    Messages:
    345
    Nobody knows. We need to wait for further details. Until those details are available, it's best that the plane is grounded.
     
    DeniseJH and CSPhysio like this.
  16. Maistre Gracey

    Maistre Gracey DIS Veteran

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2002
    Messages:
    9,252
    A fair amount of speculation in your post.
    I’ll wait for the report.
     
  17. Maistre Gracey

    Maistre Gracey DIS Veteran

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2002
    Messages:
    9,252
    A Boeing 767 nose dived a few weeks ago. Is that normal? No. That is never normal, but it *may or may not* be an airplane design issue.
     
  18. Sandeep1

    Sandeep1 Mouseketeer

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2018
    Messages:
    345
    You can wait as long as you want. Thankfully you aren't making decisions that involve human life.
     
    CSPhysio likes this.
  19. Maistre Gracey

    Maistre Gracey DIS Veteran

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2002
    Messages:
    9,252
    Really?? I’m a captain for a major airline.

    Full disclosure: I fly the Airbus, so I am NOT an expert on the Boeing.
     
  20. ForMyBoys

    ForMyBoys DIS Veteran

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2013
    Messages:
    1,045
    Well to be fair in the criminal justice system they do arrest suspects and require posted bonds. To me this would be similar to grounding planes while they are being investigated.
     
  21. Maistre Gracey

    Maistre Gracey DIS Veteran

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2002
    Messages:
    9,252
    I’m all for the grounding now that at least there is some evidence that the two crashes *may* be related.
    Without that evidence, the grounding case is weak imo.
     

Share This Page