Walt Disney World and Disneyland Operational Updates due to Coronavirus

rteetz

Rumors and News Moderator
Moderator
Joined
Feb 20, 2013
We are going to keep a central place for updates regarding the parks going forward. Any official word from Disney will be posted here and in this first post.


As of March 14th, Disneyland and California Adventure will close to guests.

As of March 16th, Disneyland Resort hotels will close to guests.



Broadway Venues Close Amid Coronavirus Pandemic, Cancelling Disney on Broadway Performances



As of March 15th Walt Disney World Parks will close. Hotels and Disney Springs to remain open.


Disney Cruise Line and Disneyland Paris also to face closures.






Walt Disney World Resort to Continue Offering Select Transportation Options Through the End of March




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Disney's Hilton Head Island Resort to Close Friday, March 20 Due to Coronavirus Concerns

Disney's Magical Express to Cease Motorcoach Operation this Friday at Walt Disney World

Walt Disney World Transportation to Cease Operations Tonight at 11 p.m.

runDisney Cancels 2020 Star Wars Rival Run Weekend Races

Adventures by Disney Final Payment Extended for Select Summer 2020 Adventures

The Wheel, Madame Tussauds, and Sea Life Aquarium Closing Temporarily Due to Coronavirus Outbreak

LEGOLAND Florida Extends Temporary Closure of its Theme Park and Water Park Through April 14

Give Kids the World Village to Remain Closed Through April 19, 2020

SeaWorld Parks & Resorts in Florida to Remain Closed Until Further Notice
 
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AKNOTTS66

Mouseketeer
Joined
Jul 25, 2014

Article:

"As various sports leagues and major conferences decide to postpone seasons and events in wake of the spreading coronavirus pandemic, Disney hasn’t made the decision to close some of its most visited theme parks.

In the United States, there are more than 1,300 confirmed coronavirus cases, and extreme precautions are being taken to contain the spread as that number is expected to rise. As more cases pop up in California and Florida — home of Disney’s two parks in the United States — and visitors continue to enter the resorts, it’s the cast members (the terminology Disney uses to refer to employees) who are left to wonder what happens next. The Verge has reached out to Disney for more information about the current plan regarding its parks divisions in the United States; the company has already closed parks in Tokyo, Shanghai, and Hong Kong.

“We have heard very little from management about the response to COVID-19,” one employee with knowledge of the situation, who asked to remain anonymous out of fear of retaliation, told The Verge. “I haven’t heard a single word about other parks closing, almost like it is a dirty secret. I’ve seen a lot of companies talking about extended sick leaves, working from home, and working with insurance to ensure free testing but nothing of the sort from Disney other than ‘wash your hands.’”

Dr. Pamela Hymel, chief medical officer for Disney parks, said in a statement that Disney parks are exceptionally clean destinations, but acknowledged the company is keeping an eye on things.

“I HAVEN’T HEARD A SINGLE WORD ABOUT OTHER PARKS CLOSING, ALMOST LIKE IT IS A DIRTY SECRET”

“As part of our commitment to the health and well-being of our cast, guests and the larger community, we are carefully monitoring the evolving coronavirus situation and are in regular contact with health agencies for information and guidance,” Hymel said on March 10th. “Walt Disney World Resort and Disneyland Resort, are welcoming guests as usual and we continue to implement preventive measures in line with the recommendations of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and other health agencies.”

Disneyland Paris issued a formal statement today confirming it will remain open while lowering the number of people who can enter the park in accordance with new country policies. Between March 12th and April 15th, queue lines won’t exceed 1,000 people, which follows France’s coronavirus-fighting measures. While parades at the park have been canceled during the period, restaurants, shops, and attractions remain open. In France, the total number of confirmed coronavirus cases rose from 497 cases on Tuesday to 2,281 cases today. More than 30 people have died, and more than 100 are in serious condition. That number is expected to grow.

Disney’s cast member situation is unique. Many of the cast members live together in apartments near the park. This employee told The Verge that although they don’t have day-to-day interactions with guests, they live with a number of cast members who do. “If one gets it, we all get it,” they explained. Due to the unique living arrangements for so many of the park’s employees, there’s fear the virus could spread quickly. It also means that a large number of cast members and employees could have to undergo a two-week quarantine. Full-time Disney park employees receive full health benefits. There is also a clinic on-site that employees can go to that is cheaper, but not free.

“IF ONE GETS IT, WE ALL GET IT”

“Imagine if this breaks out in the college program housing,” they said, referring to a Disney program that pairs a number of people together in one house. “I feel like they have to address these things but that it would dig deep into a culture of underpaying and intern labor.”

Closing Disney parks could also have benefits for public health at large. Past cases show how preventing big gatherings can lead to diminishing cases instead of a rise in infected people. In 1918, during the influenza epidemic, fewer people died in cities that closed places like schools and churches ahead of time. St. Louis was able to reduce the spread of disease by canceling sports games and closing movie theaters when the epidemic was still in its early stages. This helps to explain why a number of major events have been canceled, including SXSW, Emerald City Comic Con, and the Geneva Motor Show.
Disney’s executive team is keenly aware of the issue. Executive chairman Bob Iger told shareholders at the company’s annual shareholder meeting yesterday that “it’s fair to say we’re all sobered by the concern that we feel for everyone affected by this global crisis,” adding that “these are challenging times for everyone.”

“What we’ve demonstrated over the years is that we’re incredibly resilient,” Iger told shareholders. “If you think about the world today, what we create has never been more necessary or more important.”

“IT’S FAIR TO SAY WE’RE ALL SOBERED BY THE CONCERN THAT WE FEEL FOR EVERYONE AFFECTED BY THIS GLOBAL CRISIS
Neither Iger nor Bob Chapek, Disney’s new CEO, addressed future park closures at length. Chapek, who used to run Disney’s parks division before stepping into Iger’s previous role as head of the company, touted the opening of Avengers Campus at Disneyland in July 2020 — a massive extension to the park that brings many of the Marvel Cinematic Universe characters to the physical space. There was no direct talk about the closures of parks in Tokyo, Shanghai, and Hong Kong — or what happens to Paris, Anaheim, and Orlando. Disney currently doesn’t have a new parks head following Chapek’s promotion.

One analyst pointed out that although Disney parks will likely close their doors if the new coronavirus continues to spread throughout Orlando and Anaheim, it’s a $20 billion-a-year business. Disney will continue to operate the parks until it absolutely can’t — like the company did in China and Japan.

Since the outbreak, three emails have gone out: one from HR, one from Chapek, and one from Josh D’Amaro, the newly appointed president of Walt Disney World Resort in Orlando, according to the employee. The company also set up a hotline for employees to call. But the teams haven’t received any information about whether they’ll be financially supported if they get sick. “I haven’t been spoken to about it by higher management once,” the employee said. A central hub that employees can use for ongoing information about the parks in general, which now has a COVID-19 portal, was updated today to reflect the state of California’s guidance to limit large gatherings.

“DISNEYLAND RESORT CAST MEMBERS ARE REPORTING TO WORK TODAY”

“Disneyland Resort Cast Members are reporting to work today,” the message reads. “We have a dedicated team across our resort planning and activating to manage our operation and will share more as information becomes available. Walt Disney World Resort [in Orlando] remains open today and scheduled Cast Members should report to work.”
A union contract for employees states that Disney “may decide to pay us up to five days for missed work — ‘may’ being the key word,” according to the employee. Employees are worried that if the parks close, they won’t be able to afford food and rent. But the alternative, working at the parks and dealing with guests who may or may not be carrying the new coronavirus, is just as concerning.
“Everywhere I see the financial impact the virus is having, but almost nothing on the people impact,” the employee said. “Forcing full-time and part-time employees to not work and not get paid for a week to several weeks is incredibly scary. A lot of people here live week-to-week and this could devastate their lives.”"
 


tlmadden73

DIS Veteran
Joined
Oct 9, 2014
I think that is going to be the problem Disney is going to have going forward .. whether it is "safe" to have the parks open or not doesn't matter anymore. With all these sporting events canceling things "indefinitely" .. if Disney doesn't follow suit, they will get a huge black eye about being "greedy" .. or they will just have tons of employees call out sick in a panic, not wanting to be exposed at work, but at the same time, if the parks close -- they are out of a job for perhaps a long period of time with no other jobs available as the tourist industry basically takes the next 1-2 months off.
Disney (and their employees) are in a potential lose/lose situation here.

Either way .. the parks aren't going to be the same for the next 6 months probably.

On the LONG-TERM bright side (and I don't mean to make light of the situation, just looking back) . .since a lot of the discounts and incentives we have enjoyed the past 20 years stemmed from the tourist downturn after 9/11, we could see the same thing here for 2020 and 2021 .. "better" discounts and incentives (like free dining or extra magic hours) to get people back in the parks after this HOPEFULLY passes.
 
  • Remy is Up

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    May 10, 2018
    Posting something inflammatory from a very politically motivated website isnt fact or news and has nothing to do with this thread.
    That being said, Disney has decisions to make and will certainly make them. But, keep in mind, the whole tourism industry is being slammed and the tone form most companies at this point is if you get it, use sick leave and then STD. If you dont have that and cant work, then you arent getting paid. Not to say Disney will follow suit BUT if they do they wont be the only ones.
     

    2Gma

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    Apr 10, 2015
    Disney where have you been in the past 24 hours?!! Please be part of the solution and not the problem. #canceleverything

    Yes, losing out on a vacation and $$$ stinks (myself included) but we all need to do our part to #flattenthecurve...it's our best opportunity for better survival rates.
     

    Remy is Up

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    May 10, 2018
    Disney where have you been in the past 24 hours?!! Please be part of the solution and not the problem. #canceleverything

    Yes, losing out on a vacation and $$$ stinks (myself included) but we all need to do our part to #flattenthecurve...it's our best opportunity for better survival rates.
    As long as people realize the ramifications of making decisions like this. Thats why its taking so long. Because they are trying to find the right solution, not just a solution. The travel industry is already in the toilet, keep in mind what is going to happen in Florida if and when they make a decision to close. Lots of jobs will be lost and the economy will suffer. That in turn will have a ripple effect on other parts of the country. This isnt a simple solution to find.
     

    rteetz

    Rumors and News Moderator
    Moderator
    Joined
    Feb 20, 2013
    Disney where have you been in the past 24 hours?!! Please be part of the solution and not the problem. #canceleverything

    Yes, losing out on a vacation and $$$ stinks (myself included) but we all need to do our part to #flattenthecurve...it's our best opportunity for better survival rates.
    As I have mentioned elsewhere there is so much at play here. They can't just announce we are shutting everything down today without a plan for every aspect impacted.
     
  • 2Gma

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    Apr 10, 2015
    Agreed, no simple solution. There are many logistics at play but they could put something out..."operational hours will be adjusted, more details released soon."

    Yes, the virus will cause chain reactions throughout our economy through many companies, the world really, everyone will be affected somehow.
     

    Krandor

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Mar 26, 2014
    I'll repeat what i sad in the old thread.

    I do expect Disney is planning to close things down but they can't just announce that without having answers for people on refunds, DVC, what happens to people currently on property, etc etc. and that information needs to be dispersed to staff before they can make an announcement. As soon as that announcement is made, the phone lines will be lighting up and the people answering those phones need answers to give people. Otherwise it looks bad when people call for questions and get told "we don't know yet". Just a lot of logistics that disney has to think through before they could issue a statemet like that
     
  • only hope

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jun 7, 2014
    Forgive my ignorance but I don't understand the job loss thing. Obviously places need money coming in to pay their employees, but for something this big...everyone is struggling and they'll need employees to run things when they re-open. I probably just don't get it though.
    Temporary/seasonal employees at WDW could lose their jobs. But the bigger concern to me is the ripple effect, particularly in the areas within a short drive of WDW/Universal. I don’t think WDW would lay off permanent employees, at least not immediately. There are hundreds of hotels, bars, restaurants, shops, and other attractions that get a large part of their business from tourists that the parks bring to Fl. A waiter, housecleaner, cashier, etc are all easily replaceable. If income drops low enough long enough, jobs will be lost. When the economy picks back up, then they’ll hire again.
     

    Remy is Up

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    May 10, 2018
    Forgive my ignorance but I don't understand the job loss thing. Obviously places need money coming in to pay their employees, but for something this big...everyone is struggling and they'll need employees to run things when they re-open. I probably just don't get it though.
    The tourism industry ( Airlines, Vacation Destinations, etc etc as well as a whole State like Florida where tourism money is huge) is a big piece of the pie and has a ripple effect. When the income to airlines drops and flights are missed or cancelled, when Disney has to shut down, when large events are cancelled, there is no revenue or lost revenue and without a way to create more, the next step is eliminate labor through layoffs, furloughs, or just a sorry we have no hours available. This is a lot bigger than just a virus making people sick and we have to stop things. It has an adverse effect on the economy that will take time to recover from.
     

    Remy is Up

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    May 10, 2018
    I'll repeat what i sad in the old thread.

    I do expect Disney is planning to close things down but they can't just announce that without having answers for people on refunds, DVC, what happens to people currently on property, etc etc. and that information needs to be dispersed to staff before they can make an announcement. As soon as that announcement is made, the phone lines will be lighting up and the people answering those phones need answers to give people. Otherwise it looks bad when people call for questions and get told "we don't know yet". Just a lot of logistics that disney has to think through before they could issue a statemet like that
    Yep and the CMs will be given a specific script to follow with answers they are given and nothing more. They dont make the decisions, just the front line that people talk to and catch all the heat.
     

    gatour

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Mar 14, 2002
    Forgive my ignorance but I don't understand the job loss thing. Obviously places need money coming in to pay their employees, but for something this big...everyone is struggling and they'll need employees to run things when they re-open. I probably just don't get it though.
    If you are normally scheduled for X number of hours per week, and are now not scheduled for those hours, that is a job loss. You most likely won't have a job for several weeks or months. Those employees will most likely move on or worse case be living on the streets, perhaps with no transportation once things open back up
     

    Remy is Up

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    May 10, 2018
    If you are normally scheduled for X number of hours per week, and are now not scheduled for those hours, that is a job loss. You most likely won't have a job for several weeks or months. Those employees will most likely move on or worse case be living on the streets, perhaps with no transportation once things open back up
    Unfortunate but true. The ripple effect is damaging
     

    The Jackal

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Oct 24, 2017
    Let’s face the real facts. WDW is a global destination. People from all over the world have been bringing with them to WDW illnesses for decades. Almost every trip, someone in my party gets some kind of illness from there. COVID 19 is very easily transferred and people have different severity of symptoms when infected. Should they shut down, I personally don’t think they should. Business for them will slow down. Everything in life is deadly. Driving in a car is deadly, walking down a road is deadly with impaired and distracted drivers. Should you stop getting the mail out of the mailbox because someone gets hit and killed by a distracted driver? It happens more than you think.
     

    freshmanjs

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Aug 6, 2006
    Let’s face the real facts. WDW is a global destination. People from all over the world have been bringing with them to WDW illnesses for decades. Almost every trip, someone in my party gets some kind of illness from there. COVID 19 is very easily transferred and people have different severity of symptoms when infected. Should they shut down, I personally don’t think they should. Business for them will slow down. Everything in life is deadly. Driving in a car is deadly, walking down a road is deadly with impaired and distracted drivers. Should you stop getting the mail out of the mailbox because someone gets hit and killed by a distracted driver? It happens more than you think.
    The last part of this post is absurd. The implication of what you’re saying is that because all of life has some risk, we should accept any risk. I mean why use condoms? Who cares about hiv? Getting the mail is dangerous, so what the heck.
     

    Remy is Up

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    May 10, 2018
    Let’s face the real facts. WDW is a global destination. People from all over the world have been bringing with them to WDW illnesses for decades. Almost every trip, someone in my party gets some kind of illness from there. COVID 19 is very easily transferred and people have different severity of symptoms when infected. Should they shut down, I personally don’t think they should. Business for them will slow down. Everything in life is deadly. Driving in a car is deadly, walking down a road is deadly with impaired and distracted drivers. Should you stop getting the mail out of the mailbox because someone gets hit and killed by a distracted driver? It happens more than you think.
    While I agree with you, I also think it comes down to public pressure. The NCAA hasnt cancelled the NCAA tournament yet, but now Duke and Kansas have said they wont play even if it is without fans and every sportscaster is asking why when NBA, NHL, MLB, and MLS have all put things on hold, why hasnt the NCAA. Everyone will start asking why Disney, Busch, Universal, etc are still open when so many others are closing. Whether we agree or not that it seems kind of crazy, the concensus is that it is absolutely going to be a problem and people should stop gatherings. Lots of moving parts
     



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