Vasovagal Syncope Experiences?

Discussion in 'disABILITIES!' started by Tempty, Oct 10, 2018.

  1. Tempty

    Tempty Earning My Ears

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    Hey all!
    So I suffer from VVS also known as vasovagal syncope, which is a condition where upon encountering certain triggers (my strongest ones being heat, lack of sleep, hunger, and stress) I will pass out. It's only for a couple of seconds that I'm fully unconscious, but it freaks out everyone around me (it still freaks me out sometimes too, tbh).

    I know how to manage my triggers and symptoms pretty well, and I know my limits for the most part. I did unfortunately pass out twice on my last trip 10/1-10/6, once in line for Expedition Everest (which of course petrified the cast members).

    I'm mainly just curious as to if Disney recognizes this condition as a disability? It's an invisible condition and until I actually do pass out, you wouldn't know something is wrong with me. I do have FMLA at my job so it is a real, medically diagnosed, legitimate disability but I feel like it may be something Disney would look at and go "yeah SURE you pass out, uh huh"

    I was too nervous/embarrassed to ask about it on my last trip and I'm wishing I had asked about it because maybe I could have gotten some accommodations to help with the trip. Does anyone have experience with this condition and interacting with Disney? What accommodations, if any, could you get?
     
  2. lanejudy

    lanejudy Moderator Moderator

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    What accommodation(s) do you have in mind? Disney doesn’t “recognize” diagnoses, the accommodations are based on needs. Specifically what is needed to make the queues accessible to you. You would have to explain those needs (not diagnosis) to request a DAS. You might benefit from use of a wheelchair or rollator, to provide a place to sit when needed. And trying to manage your triggers is key, as those may not really be things WDW can accommodate for you.

    I’m glad you enjoyed your vacation!
     
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  4. Tempty

    Tempty Earning My Ears

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    Thank you! I think a wheelchair would likely be the best thing, but the problem is I don't need it all the time. If I'm starting to feel faint, then I would need it. I would HATE to be "taking" a wheelchair from someone who actually needs it 24/7, which is why it makes me nervous and embarrassed to even talk about it to Disney. I would likely just need the wheelchair for the actual queues themselves, because standing with little movement for 45+ minutes in a hot space, with tons of people crowded together, is a huge issue for me. If I could have just sat down in a wheelchair I likely wouldn't have passed out in line for Expedition Everest. I also feel like since I don't need the wheelchair 24/7 I would be denied one, because some people really do need it. Is that fear just something I'm making up in my head?
     
  5. HopperFan

    HopperFan "It's a bug-eat-bug world out there, princess."

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    My DS was given this diagnosis about 6-7 years ago on top of multiple other disabilities. He actually just passed out two weeks ago so I was a bit nervous heading to Disney last weekend knowing it was crowded. He may or may not sense it happening and actually can faceplant before I can grab him.

    I am familiar with DAS. I honestly don't know how it would help and actually the traveling about getting it can be more tiring, more overheating than using the FP+ system. We prefer to use our FP+ early in day and then roll that 4th all day. This keeps us from too much walking, too much time spent out in the sun and avoiding waiting around and waiting. Sounds like understanding and highly utilizing the FP+ system back to back would be very helpful.

    AND if you think a wheelchair would help, get it, MANY people who use at Disney have no use for them any other time. Wheelchairs are rented to anyone who wants to rent them, they don't ask you any questions. You could also look at a rollator which would be less bulky but give you a seat. Disney does not rent those but outside companies do or they are inexpensive to buy.

    And staying aware of your triggers, that is huge.
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2018
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  6. Tempty

    Tempty Earning My Ears

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    Okay, that part about them not asking questions is mostly what I was concerned about haha
    Thank you! I feel much better and not as embarrassed anymore :)
     
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  7. MinnieMSue

    MinnieMSue DIS Veteran

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    My daughter and I both have it. Honestly as long as you aren’t by yourself whomever you are with should be able to tell everyone you are fine and will be getting up shortly and that it isn’t a big deal. The wheelchair is good. I use a rollator (it has a seat which helps with this but mostly I need it for my back ). A wheelchair is fine. You shouldn’t need any other accommodations most likely. We don’t do anything special except make sure my employee and coworkers know and her school/teachers/friends do. It is actually pretty common
     
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  8. OurBigTrip

    OurBigTrip DIS Veteran

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    It isn't an issue of Disney denying you a wheelchair - you rent one, so unless they're out for the day, it isn't an issue.
     
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  9. suemom2kay

    suemom2kay DIS Veteran

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    You can get a drive Medical brand wheelchair for about $110 large online retailer. Very lightweight and if you are flying airline will gate check it. That’s what we did when my daughter was non weight bearing on her right leg.
     
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