Unwanted attention from the rainbow Magic Band on a child?

CapnJacksGirl

Mom to two little scalliwags!
Joined
Oct 25, 2006
My soon to be 12 year old son wants the rainbow Magic Band for our upcoming trip. He likes that it is bright colored and fun and doesn't know the significance of the rainbow. My question is this.....I think and have thought for a while now that he may be gay and hasn't quite figured it out yet or isn't yet willing to say. I want to be as supportive as possible and don't want to put him into any unnecessary, uncomfortable positions while he figures it out. If I get him the rainbow Magic Band, is it at all likely that someone will say something to him? It sounds preposterous to me that anyone would say something insensitive to a child, but I've been to WDW enough times to know that people can and will do just about anything. I'm just concerned that if I get it for him and someone says something stupid, it will make him uncomfortable and might cause him undue worry. I keep going back and forth on it. My gut says get it, explain the context, and prepare him so that if someone says something idiotic, he is ready to ignore it or tell them to mind their own business. I'm just trying to be the best mom possible so I can protect and support my kid. Any advice and positive thoughts are welcome! TIA!
 

crvetter

DIS Veteran
Joined
Nov 26, 2018
He likes that it is bright colored and fun and doesn't know the significance of the rainbow.
I personally don't think there is anything wrong with him wanting the band specifically for this purpose. I think it's great you are offering to explain the significance and at the very least he's an ally.
If I get him the rainbow Magic Band, is it at all likely that someone will say something to him?
I don't think it is likely. I go to WDW and DLR all the time with my partner. I've never once had anything said to us at either resort so I think the odds are fairly low that anyone would say anything about the MagicBand. It's most likely that people might not even notice it or even put two and two together on the short timeframe that they would see the MagicBand.
My gut says get it, explain the context, and prepare him so that if someone says something idiotic, he is ready to ignore it or tell them to mind their own business.
I don't have a child; however, I think explaining the meaning of the band would be a worthy discussion--it's a good time to show support for the community in general, which I personally think would be great moment with your son and at 12 I think your son would know your support would apply to him if applicable. Perhaps you could just mention off-handed that it's great he wants to support LGBT+ movement.

Anecdotally, I think I would have felt really uncomfortable if someone told me someone might say something. I might have avoided it for no reason.
 
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CapnJacksGirl

Mom to two little scalliwags!
Joined
Oct 25, 2006
Thanks for the comments! I fear I may be overthinking things in my efforts to make sure he is OK with things, whether it affects him directly or if he is simply a supporter of the community like me. I think you are right....he likes the Magic Band and it is a great opportunity to instill some positive values about supporting others. He's a pretty caring little dude so we'll have a good talk and he can wear his happy new Magic Band!
 
  • DISNEY1975

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    May 5, 2008
    My kids always loved rainbows, both sons and daughter. In our world, it means nothing, just something pretty. If I saw someone wearing a rainbow band, I would think absolutely nothing...well at least until now that you brought it up! I would like think nobody is really paying attention to anyone outside their own party at Disney. If that is the case that people are really checking out other people, I need to rethink wearing a bathing suit at the waterparks :rotfl2:
     

    MickyLynn

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    Apr 5, 2019
    Nobody said anything about DH's rainbow ears other than "I like your ears". But I agree that you might want to give him a heads up that in this case the rainbow design is significant.
     
  • SG131

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Apr 3, 2017
    WDW is a pretty inclusive place, I doubt you'll hear any comments than love your band. It still would be worth discussing what it stands for if for no other reason than to keep the lines of communication open with him and who knows maybe he already knew the meaning and it leads to another conversation.
     

    Jason_V

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    Mar 24, 2017
    Caveat: I'm not a parent and I likely will never be one. That being said, if he were my son, I'd let him pick his Magic Band and be done with it. I understand you wanting to protect him and prepare him for all sorts of contingencies, but that's not terribly realistic in life. If something happens, then you can address it.

    WDW and DLR are two of the safest/inclusive places you're gonna find. I doubt anyone will say anything aside from a "cool Magic Band"-type comment. I've gone to the parks multiple times on non-Gay Days holding my mixed race ex's hand and no one batted an eye. My guess is it'll be the same for you.
     

    Legolas813

    Earning My Ears
    Joined
    Jul 18, 2019
    I'm a new passholder and have never used or seen a magicband before. Where would I find a rainbow one?

    EDIT: I see now you can buy it on the Disney Shop. It's not available on the passholder magicband page.
     
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    jscunningham699

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    Aug 19, 2013
    I think you should just let him pick whatever Magic band he wants. The rainbow isn't only about the LGBQT community. Lots of religious organizations use it too that have nothing to do with the LGBQT community. Besides, I doubt anyone will say anything because the bands are on your wrist and there's too much going on for people to pay attention to someone else's wrist.
     
  • Dreamsofcolor

    Earning My Ears
    Joined
    Jul 15, 2013
    In all respect I think you might be over thinking this. I highly doubt anyone will say anything (let alone notice). Let him choose what he wants. :) On a side note, I am very happy to hear you are supportive if he does happen to be gay. Not everyone who comes out gets that blessing.
     

    Chuck S

    DVC Co-Moderator
    Moderator
    Joined
    Feb 6, 2000
    My question is this.....I think and have thought for a while now that he may be gay and hasn't quite figured it out yet or isn't yet willing to say.
    If he's 12 and in public school anywhere in the US, he likely already knows that a rainbow can, but not always, have a GLBT connotation. Sometimes a rainbow is just a pretty rainbow, and maybe he just likes rainbows and colors. I still like pastels and some fairly bright colors, I never liked dark colors. Of course, I was 12 many. many, many years ago. My Mom, bless her, had a talk and suggested I might be gay. At 12, I reacted like most 12 year olds when discussing human anatomy....with...."Eewwwwww!" She was right, of course, but it took a while for me to realize it. Some people know early in life, some don't, they just may feel "different." So gently keep the lines of communication open, I think discussing what the significance of the rainbow may be, and letting him know you're OK with gay people, in general, is a good start. And he may be pleasantly surprised that his Mom is so cool.
     

    anomamatt

    Fastpass+ Strategist
    Joined
    Sep 28, 2016
    FWIW:

    My 7-year old has the rainbow mickey MB. She gets positive comments from time to time, like "I like your magic band." or "great magic band". My daughter is also transgender, but that isn't really relevant to the question at hand. And my wife also has the rainbow mickey MB and she isn't LGBT.

    I would be shocked if anyone said anything other than very positive comments.
     

    Plasticletters

    Ride a Bike
    Joined
    Jun 8, 2009
    Disney is aware of their market with all of their rainbow gear (and how and when they feature it for sale), but literally hundreds of straight/cis people purchase those items every day without a thought towards what they might suggest to others.
    If some terrible homophobe wants to give your child grief for sporting a rainbow, then you're unfortunate to have crossed paths with them - but terrible people will find things to ruin in anything.
    Enjoy the rainbow magic band. It'll be fine :)
     

    MightyDuck001

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Oct 28, 2009
    The only time I've ever made comments on someone's pride themed attire in Disney was two women wearing matching pride shirts (castle with the rainbow) and I was two passion fruit vodkas slushes in at Epcot and said they looked adorable together then went on to say I'd just broken up with my girlfriend and I was going to die alone before my friend dragged me off.

    The kids I just assume like rainbows.
     

    DisneyOma

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jul 27, 2015
    I think you should just let him pick whatever Magic band he wants. The rainbow isn't only about the LGBQT community. Lots of religious organizations use it too that have nothing to do with the LGBQT community. Besides, I doubt anyone will say anything because the bands are on your wrist and there's too much going on for people to pay attention to someone else's wrist.
    Besides Rainbow Girls, I don't know of any other religious groups that use the rainbow to represent anything but inclusion and support of the LGBTQ community in this area of the US. Which other organizations use the rainbow?
     

    Lilsia

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Feb 17, 2018
    Besides Rainbow Girls, I don't know of any other religious groups that use the rainbow to represent anything but inclusion and support of the LGBTQ community in this area of the US. Which other organizations use the rainbow?
    The rainbow has been a symbol of Hawaii for decades. The rainbow is on their license plate and on all kinds of tourist items. Growing up, we had rainbows on all kinds of clothes and I still see that(although not as much anymore unfortunately) because little girls like rainbows. Adults should not ascribe ulterior motives to children when they see things like this. I would just assume that the child likes the colors of the magic band. I have zero issues with anybody or their preferences. But I do wish that the rainbow can just be a rainbow, especially when it comes to children wearing something with rainbow/rainbow colors.
     

    igrsod

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    May 11, 2010
    I've seen so many little kids wearing rainbow ears at Disney and no one bats an eye. I think it's awesome that you are thinking of him and also that you are so open and accepting of whatever his choice maybe in the future, but like others have said, you may be overthinking it. I would be so surprised if you received anything but positive comments. Most people are too busy trying to get to their next FP or dining reservation to notice lol.
     

    Mousemom234

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    May 12, 2012
    His magic band, his choice. Rainbows are pretty. They don't HAVE to mean anything. Your support will keep him from regretting getting it.
    If some terrible homophobe wants to give your child grief for sporting a rainbow, then you're unfortunate to have crossed paths with them - but terrible people will find things to ruin in anything.
    Enjoy the rainbow magic band. It'll be fine :)
    This. But I'll change it just a bit - you're FORTUNATE to have crossed paths. It's a good lesson on how rude and unthinking some people can be when they think they've the only correct way of thinking. I'd mention the possibility of an 'incident' to him, and make sure he knows he has your support and that you agree with most of us that some people only exist to take up space
     

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