The ABCs of Starting Over; A 2-Week Journey in Becoming a Kentucky Woman- O is for: Oh, Barstow! (11/27)

Steppesister

DIS Veteran
Joined
Dec 27, 2013
That chandeliers are fascinating. So are the salons and the ceilings and the bed and breakfast you stayed at.

Your breakfast conversation sounds like it was a very pleasant experience. I guess that is a benefit of staying at a B&B.
It certainly was an interesting place to visit, and I'm so glad I put it onto the list of stops!

I love staying at B&B's and don't think I've ever been disappointed in a stay. I'll continue to stay at them when it makes sense.
That is something that I never thought about before. What is the difference between a Marshall and a sheriff?
This is the best, most succinct explanation I found, but would add that only MARSHAL could ARREST a sheriff. LOL!

"What was the difference between a sheriff and a Marshall in the Old West?


Traditionally in the Old West, the sheriff was an elected county official. Towns elected or appointed marshals and also constables. A U.S. marshal was a federal appointment and covered outlaws who broke federal laws. ... Towns that were county seats, like Tombstone, would have both a county sheriff and a town marshal."
 

suse66

When you wish upon a star, your dreams come true!
Joined
Sep 3, 2008
Nevada has some very, very pretty places, and some very, very bleak places. But all of it interesting.

The Grand Canyon is a TOUGH slog. I've known loads of friends who've done it, but it is NOT easy. I"ve rafted it and it was SO much fun! Bryce and Zion are amazingly beautiful places I do hope you can tag along to see that area.
Rafting the Grand Canyon sounds amazing! Bill loves hiking and did a major trek on Lake Superior this summer. He has a few plans ready for some US travel now that the order is finally opening on November 8th! So exciting!
 

Steppesister

DIS Veteran
Joined
Dec 27, 2013
What a unique town - a lot of character and interesting history. Nice you had enough time there to really explore. Anxious to see your pictures of Mono Lake!
I"m so glad we put that on our list of places to visit! :) I'm glad we made the effort to see a bit more before we had to leave too.

Mono Lake coming up soon... but may be a bit before I can post again... a couple of big weeks ahead as I start my new job.
 

Steppesister

DIS Veteran
Joined
Dec 27, 2013
Boooooring.
:laughing:
I know. I accidentally left my busters backpack in the car, so they gravitated to it instead. And now, my car's a doombuggy. Which is super cool.
Like most of the younger set.
I confess, I enjoy a good sleep in now and then. Too bad that hasn't happened in months.

Thanks for pointing that out.
My pleasure!

Thanks for the tour. Lotta good shots there.
Why thanks.

Yes. you want to save the shutters… not the people.

:rolleyes1
:laughing:
I’d pay to do that. But I suspect they’d need rails like they put up for kids at bowling alleys.
Well, yeah, unless they want beer all over the floor. Messy for the bar top slots they have.
I didn’t think we had marshals up here until one knocked on my door.
Ummmm, ok then. Is is storytime with PK?
This is possible???
I know.... such a foreign, perhaps archaic concept.
::yes::
I saw a bumper sticker once that said:
“Driver picks the music, shotgun shuts his pie hole”
:lmao:
 

Steppesister

DIS Veteran
Joined
Dec 27, 2013
The lighting really is great here.
::yes::
Preferably soaked in gasoline if you can help it.
As old as that wood is, I doubt you'd need it, but there really is no such thing as doing "too good of a job", is there?
I've always wanted to do that! But I'd probably spill a lot of beer.
I'm sure no more than any other tourist. They could have a spillage trough and give it to the horses.

Looks like a classic Western shot there.
Mission accomplished. :)

Oh, come on. That doesn't happen.
Lost and dying art.
 

Steppesister

DIS Veteran
Joined
Dec 27, 2013
Rafting the Grand Canyon sounds amazing! Bill loves hiking and did a major trek on Lake Superior this summer. He has a few plans ready for some US travel now that the order is finally opening on November 8th! So exciting!
It's SUPER exciting!!! I could jump for joy for all of you who've been waiting... FAR too long. :dancer:
 
  • MAGICFOR2

    Condimentessa
    Joined
    Nov 29, 2005
    Day 1; Pt. 1- H is for: Hope on the Hazy Horizon

    Salem, Oregon to Klamath Falls, Oregon

    Thus began a most epic road trip- one that neither my traveling companion son Zach, nor I, will soon forget.


    I'm so glad you got to do this trip together. An epic memory for the two of you!



    For days, even weeks before our set date to depart, fires began to burn along the planned path of our first day.
    DUN DUN DUN


    . In its stead, we endured endless swathes of blackened and scarred landscape; forest after forest of towering, charred Douglas Fir, Cedar, and Hemlock stood as sickening remnants of a once thriving and vibrant ecosystem teeming with life and promise. The Jack Fire and Rough Patch Complex were actively devouring with hungry, angry flames both our enjoyment of the drive but also our chances of seeing the two long-awaited sights along our way. Our eyes burned and our throats felt dry – the taste of smoke was not unnoticed and water was inadequate in washing it away. Dozens of fire crew trucks passed us coming the opposite way, were pulled over here or there, coming out of hot shot camps- aside from us they were the only ones on this road over the Cascade Range.






    (Last year's fire- obviously we didn't get close to the one burning)
    We have been enduring this for several years now. This is due to laws enacted by those who don't live here, don't work in the forest and know nothing about it. We are no longer allowed to manage the forests, so they burn like this when lightening strikes. Horrible mis-management.

    gave my son-child AND $80 and was given a brand-new shiny National Parks Annual Pass in trade. A pretty fair deal I’d say except that on this day I think they should have given a discount.our Oblivious Captain (@Captain_Oblivious ) for that pass hack but little did I know,

    after hemming and hawing a great deal, just how much money I'd saved myself in deciding to pony up for the AP.


    Good move! Nice of the Captain to show us the way!













    I feel bad you didn't get the usual beautiful shots with blue sky and blue water. I guess you got one almost clear of Wizard Island at least,
    :rotfl2:

    Cute souvie of ....Mexico! :rotfl2: Oh well, I'm glad it made Zach happy!













    It's been so long since I've been here regularly, I have forgotten how to quote properly, I think - my comments are inserted above. :)


    Enjoying it so far! We went to Crater Lake a couple years ago and stayed in the lodge a couple nights. So beautiful - mid June and we got snow. You never know what you're gonna get!
    We have pictures of our kids and nieces sledding in snow on the side of the road up there in their shorts and tank tops because it was July!

    Well HI THERE!! Yes, you are about to be featured as Hostess Extraordinaire. :D Next chapter!


    We did camp in our car and I'm STILL paying for it almost a week later. But that's getting ahead of myself.

    Guenther House was absolutely lovely. :) Such a beautiful setting and such cool history. We got there before opening and Rope Dropped it.


    Well, a bit of a spoiler, but I wrecked my SA Day a bit with some Benedryl. :( With the humidity, heat, and my drug-induced stupor, we pooped out pretty quickly. But WHOA! That's a bit scary! We did make it to one (San Juan) and spent at least an hour there wandering the grounds. That was super fun!
    Well, I'm glad you survived! :) I'm sorry your SA day was a bust. At least you saw a little of it!
    It’s been YEARS since I’ve been on here so I’m dipping my toes back in with your report….
    YAY!! WINKERS! Fun to see you here!
    :cheer2:

    My Friends~

    I am home from an incredible, magical trip filled with lots of wonderful DISMeets and royal treatment! There were some very fantastical moments and pixie dusts, but there were also some not-so-fun things that happened as well. I suppose that's true with everyone's trips every time. In time, I'll share all of the stories and photos from this amazing 50th Anniversary Celebration trip- it truly was a good one.

    But I came home tired and developed some health issues while there. Now I need to focus on finding insurance (rememeber.... I'm between jobs), a doctor, and a job, helping my son buy a car and move into his apartment, unpack about 30 boxes (not kidding), you know... all little stuff. ;) It'll all fall into place, but is going to take time. Needing a bit more pixie dust in the real life zone right now.

    Here are a couple of teasers though!!

    Also, I HAVE NOT forgotten my Flower and Garden TR and WILL be finishing that one too. Promise. Just... a lot of my plate right now, and it's not Food and Wine. ;)


    View attachment 610054


    View attachment 610055

    (Yes, I realize this is blurry... it's a 3D experience so no clear photos. But I'll be giving my commentary when I get to this portion.)

    View attachment 610057
    Glad you had a good time - looking forward to seeing your thoughts.

    I is for: Into the Past- Day 1 Continued and the Start of Day 2

    Day 1- Continued...

    The day was wearing on; we’d been on the road since 7:00AM and both of us were just ready to be out of the car. I’d left off with us just leaving Crater Lake on a smoky, hazy day with our night’s destination Klamath Falls. As we drove by Klamath Lake, the large birds I didn’t often, or ever, see in Salem caught my eye, which begged a few photos. Which didn’t turn out very well. But it was fun to see giant pelicans in the Pacific Northwest as well as some other water-type birds.


    Jim's HS mascot - Fighting Pelicans!!! :)




    We pulled up to Tammie’s home right about 5:00 or so, took some of our bags in, and the four of us took off for dinner a one of their local favorites, The Pikey. Here’s the FB website and menu in you’re interested.


    It is very casual and low-key and we all enjoyed a beer, wine, or cider as we looked over the menu. Not being a huge burger aficionado, I opted for a salad and filched a bite of burger off of Zach. Jim, Tammie’s hubby, ordered some Irish Nachos for the table to nibble on as well. The burger menu is fairly extensive with some not-so-common options and Zach chose the peanut butter burger. I was a skeptic. I am not anymore.

    I sat across from Jim having just ruined my dinner by putting the jalepeno ranch on my salad that I’d ordered.

    I tried to tell him to let you put your own salad dressing on
    I think the person who did the cooking/saucing made a horrible mistake and got carried away with the chili oil/powder/whatever and I literally choked on the first bite. It was totally inedible. Sometimes I wish I had more guts to send stuff back, and I just asked for some plain ranch to dilute the rest of my drowning salad. Such a bummer.



    It was terrible. I thought you were okay with adding the ranch. Should have sent it back for sure. I bet it happens all of the time.





    Dinner finished up, we headed for the car passing an evening tweaker doing what tweakers do on the way.

    Nothing like showing off your local streetmosphere! :rotfl2:

    I slept okay and we were up and out fairly early after a quick picture together. But not before Tammie rustled up a pillow to replace the one I’d left on Marcia’s bed back in Salem. Not everyone loses and forgets stuff as expertly as me- it’s a tough job, but someone’s got to do it.


    Day 1 Wrap up:



    304 miles give or take

    5.5 drive time

    Start 7AM; Finish 5PM

    Highlight- Crater Lake despite the smoke and haze, Dinner with sweet DISFriends, the beautiful Umpqua River



    Bummer(s)- The fires destroying our chances of seeing a planned stop and the view that should have been at Crater Lake

    It was great spending time with you and Zach. So fun to see him all grown up again!







    As planned, we headed towards the 395, but took a detour on a less-tourist traveled road to get there. Along the way, we made a couple of stops WELL worth your time if you want quiet places to contemplate some of our more ugly history. My intention isn’t to bring negativity here, but simply to give my thoughts and feelings as we visited the sites we stopped at.

    Warning: I’m going to give a little possibly unpopular, personal opinion. Happy to discuss but won’t argue here.

    Just south of the Oregon-California border I spotted some old, weathered buildings that looked like a ghost town. I am one to never pass up browsing around a ghost town and quickly pulled the car over to read the signs along the road. Everything was gated and barbed wired, but here is what we stumbled on (This was not planned, and we happened upon it wholly accidentally.):









    I know there are some who would like to see all traces, or ones that only fit the current PC narratives, of the past taken away or erased; I disagree. As Zach and I stood there a great melancholy washed over me and I was able to share with my son this terrible time in our history in which he had no idea had happened. It’s just not taught anymore, but here stood a tangible testament that served to remind us that there was a time that terrible things happened, and one group of people was singled out for the sole reason of race. We need places like this to continue to provide concrete reminders where one can go and be led to places of deep contemplation and fresh realization. Even if they are of figures who committed unsavory acts of hate. There not to celebrate, but to commemorate. And learn. There is no better teacher than seeing things with one’s own eyes; reading in books just can’t do the same thing.

    At the same stop a giant antique harvester stood as an altogether different testament to the area’s past. While not as emotionally evocative, it was interesting to learn about the large numbers needed on a crew to get the crops in for this community. It’s too bad that it can’t be put covered in some fashion. I’m sure the weather is pretty brutal to it.





    We didn’t linger too very long here as the day was marching on and we had other things we wanted to see….

    Our next stop was in the Lava Beds National Monument and Captain Jack’s Stronghold.



    Captain Jack was a Modoc Tribe Native leader who took his people to this area of lava tubes and natural (small) caves to seek refuge from the US Army after the Modoc War. For their numbers, they held out surprisingly long. If you want to read more about this area and its history, you can HERE. I, for one, LOVED the little self-guided interpretive trail about 0.5 miles long that Zach and I did tons of exploring on. A lot of the landscape, located inside the Lava Beds National Monument, is rough, jagged landscape covered with basaltic lava and ʻAʻā with numerous collapsed and intact lava tubes. While not really “desolate”, this area is remote and very unique.

    Before we even got started on our hike, we came across a herd of grazing White-tailed Deer. They seemed wholly unconcerned but curious about us and stood for quite a while half keeping an eye on us and half nibbling on the high desert grasses in a little low area near the parking lot. We took quite a few pictures until they decided they were done with us watching them have breakfast and disappeared over a hill and we continued on our way in the opposite direction. ** Warning: Excessive photos of deer to follow **




    We moved along... every little while there were numbered signs that corresponded with a trail guide which we didn’t have. I suppose had we come into the Lava Beds National Monument through another entrance we might have been able to get one. I also might have gotten to gloat a little when they asked me to pay. I’d have whipped out my handy-dandy little AP card and said, “In yo’ face!”. When we came out the other side with no entrance kiosk in sight, I confess, I was a little deflated. Anyway, the absolute highlight of this little stop was finding the petroglyphs left by the Modoc People. Super cool! They are a bit of work to access with some rock scrambling involved but totally worth risking a broken leg or neck. Well, okay, maybe not a broken neck, but certainly a broken leg.


    (Zach's photo)






    Thankfully, both of us made it out unscathed from this short, but sturdy little cave area. I pictured food being cooked over open fires, cozy blankets to keep people warm during the winter months, stories being told, hunting plans being made… Then again, it’s probably a wholly romanticized, inaccurate picture; who am I to know? I do know that it was a part of history I had no idea happened (this particular Native American injustice) and was thankful for the chance to come to that place to, again, contemplate and learn.




    I took a few photos along the trails, and you can see that it was still quite smoky here as well. It didn’t clear up until we reached as far as Virginia City, but from there on, for the rest of our trip, we were able to enjoy bluer skies and better air.














    (Some odder sort of volcanic rock)

    After our nice little morning hike, it was time to make some serious tracks on the drive to Virginia City. For the few days prior to our road trip I-395 was closed near Doyle due to the Dixie Fire, but the day of our departure it serendipitously was open again, so there was no need to make a lengthy detour off of the more direct route through Reno. Zach drove about an hour of his grand total 4 hours for the entire trip. There were many reasons for that, but let’s just say I was more happy driving myself.

    Until Reno.

    Navigating through Reno sucks. I can’t remember a time I got more turned around, missed more turns, or swore with more punctuation. Miraculously, I eventually managed to steer us up the right road and we headed up the steep and winding grade on our last leg from Reno to Virginia City- the Geiger Grade Rd where I'll pick it up next time...
    Lots of sad history - Wendy - JordanYost's cousin shared that her grandparents were in those camps. I believe her parents were actually children there. It is important to remember the mistakes of the past so it doesn't get repeated, however ugly.
    Captain Jack and his tribe is another tragic story,
    I see you found the petroglyphs! I know you have to take the back road to see them - I don't think I ever have..

    Why did he do that?:duck:I thought you were joking - good one



    What happened during World War II was something that I hadn't learned about until I was out of school. It needs to be remembered so that it will never happen again.
    Amen! I learned alot about these things in school - from the standpoint of explaining why these things were so wrong. From multiple teachers. I can't believe it is being glossed over in these days.

    I like to imagine how the people were living when they made the petroglyphs. The Modoc people are another group I haven't heard of.
    There are some good displays in the museum depicting the lives as they were then. Pretty cool.

    Very nice of her!

    So there was a temporarily lost phone also - so I did ask if she remembered her underwear! :rotfl2:


    You're an expert at it!

    Very nice shot of you guys... but I think you lost your shoes.




    And right there. That's why.
    "Hey! Let's do this thing."
    "No we shouldn't. They did that back in ____ and it was terrible."

    EXACTLY
    Liesa and Zach were great houseguests - just wish we had more time to visit!


    Adequate clothing.

    Including underwear. 😆



    Exactly. Or at the very least cause one to pause and remember. Or lead one to study and become aware or educated. But to bury and pretend it never happened? Or take away the visible impetuses to do so. FAR worse. I think people mistake remembering or memorializing for honoring. They are not the same and some assume the latter is happening for anyone visiting.
    Nothing makes sense anymore.


    Great shots, minus the smoke! I'm looking forward to catching up with the next chapter!

    Sounds like things are falling into place - glad to hear it. How is Zach liking his new job and apartment?
     

    pkondz

    Brace yourself for immediate disintegration
    Joined
    Mar 9, 2007
    I know. I accidentally left my busters backpack in the car, so they gravitated to it instead. And now, my car's a doombuggy. Which is super cool.
    :lmao:
    I confess, I enjoy a good sleep in now and then. Too bad that hasn't happened in months.
    Amen, sister.
    Ummmm, ok then. Is is storytime with PK?
    Not much of a story.
    We bought a house and only later found out that the former owner had gone bankrupt. For a while we kept getting his mail… including bills. One day a Marshall came a callin’ looking for him.
     
  • vamassey1

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Oct 13, 2005
    I can not tell you how much I'm enjoying your travels. Some many interesting places with so much history. Your photos are always outstanding. I'm also learning so much. I really love the B & B you stayed in. Virginia City looks like quite the gem.
     

    MAGICFOR2

    Condimentessa
    Joined
    Nov 29, 2005
    So many interesting facts to dig up in Virginia City! Thanks for the tour! I'm glad you were not bothered by the hauntings. :)

    Too bad I didn't know you had a hankerin' for some pilfered shampoo - I could have obliged you. Although it might not have been as fun if just offered. :rolleyes1
     

    Steppesister

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Dec 27, 2013
    L is for: Life in Bodie- Pt. 1 (Day 3, Cont.)



    Because life has suddenly taken a turn for the overly stressful with starting a new job, this update, and very possibly those for the foreseeable future, will be photo-heavy and prose-light. I detect very little complaining (😉) so will assume that’s acceptable. Let’s journey on, heading south of course, leaving Virginia City, NV and taking some time to visit Bodie, CA. Bodie saw its heyday in 1880 with a Main Street that was over a mile long and whose population was more than 10,000. By 1940, however, it was declared a ghost town. It was abandoned so quickly that many, many artifacts were left behind intact. Now, the California State Park system keeps it in a state of suspended decay where visitors can see a glimpse of what life may have been like for those who flocked to this mining town during its boom.





    And now, let’s let the photos do the talking; I took so many that I have to break them up into 2 posts. Enjoy!!


































     

    Steppesister

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Dec 27, 2013
    L is for: Life in Bodie- Pt. 2 (Day 3, Cont.)


    (My kids potty-trained on one of those!)


    (An impressive intact bottle collection)


    (Fiestaware?!)


    (The most ornate potbelly I've ever seen!)


    (LOVE old gas pumps!)


    At the assayers


    The seamstresses shop



    At the Sundry Store


    Pharmaceuticals



    Spice cannisters


    The firehouse- I thought this was particularly cool!
    "At one point in time, there were four fire companies for Bodie! At one point, a fire broke out at the Central Market, and all four companies came to the rescue. There wasn’t a problem until they all tried to hook up their hoses to the hydrant. Who had the authority!? Who was going to be the one to put the fire out!? Luckily for Bodie, shortly thereafter, all four companies were combined into one and fire districts were laid out for them to serve.

    On the night of August 10, 1941, the bronze bell from the firehouse belfry was stolen. Soon after, on September 28, 1941, it was returned to Bodie and is still on display today."-https://www.bodie.com/history/structures/bodie-firehouse/


    The Standard Mill-

    Here’s the Standard mill, which processed ore from the Standard Mine. (The mine was originally named the Bunker Hill mine when it was first registered in 1861.) Most of the inner workings are still in tact. During the summer months Park Aides conduct a history talk and guided tour (for a fee) where you can see some of the interior of the mill. There is a limit on the number of people per tour, and they only do a few tours a day, so make sure the Museum is your first stop when you get in town to get your tickets, as they do sell out. You can also book private group tours if you contact the Park.

    In its heyday, the mill processed more than $14 million worth of gold and silver over 25 years. On October 6, 1898 the original mill burned down, as it was built of mostly wood. In the dead of winter, at nearly 9,000 feet elevation and likely with 20 feet of snow, they immediately began rebuilding the mill. On February 1, 1899 – just a few months later, the Standard Mill re-opened. The new mill is also wood framed, but mostly covered with sheets of corrugated steel.

    Standard Mill in 1890s - Bodie.com
    In the enlarged 2001 picture of the mill (above,) you can barely see a pole at the top of the hill. It is from that point on the hill that Andrew Hallidie (inventor of the San Francisco cable railway,) designed and built an ingenious gondola system that was used to carry ore from the mine directly to the mill. This saved dozens of horses and men literally hours of work for each load of ore that was to be delivered for processing. Gondolas would be loaded at the top of the hill, and run down a “never ending cable” to the mill, where the bottom would automatically open to drop the ore into a bin.

    Also to note, according to State experts, the Standard Mill is the “most in tact” mill in California!-


    Standard Mill in 1890s - Bodie.com
    In the enlarged 2001 picture of the mill (above,) you can barely see a pole at the top of the hill. It is from that point on the hill that Andrew Hallidie (inventor of the San Francisco cable railway,) designed and built an ingenious gondola system that was used to carry ore from the mine directly to the mill. This saved dozens of horses and men literally hours of work for each load of ore that was to be delivered for processing. Gondolas would be loaded at the top of the hill, and run down a “never ending cable” to the mill, where the bottom would automatically open to drop the ore into a bin.

    Also to note, according to State experts, the Standard Mill is the “most in tact” mill in California!- https://www.bodie.com/history/structures/the-standard-mill/








    "The schoolhouse is one of the better looking buildings in town. It was originally the Bon Ton Lodging House in 1879, but was later converted to the school house, after the first one was burned down.
    The first school house was burned down by a small boy who had gotten in trouble, and was sent home. He went to the backside of the school and began setting fire to the dry brush for fun. It spread to the building and burnt it to the ground. I guess the teacher learned a lesson that time…

    Inside the Bodie Schoolhouse | Bodie.comBodie School house - interior | Bodie.comA view from inside the schoolhouse, gives you the feeling that the children are just out at play during a break. The town was abandoned so abruptly, that thousands and thousands of artifacts were simply left behind because they were too heavy, or too much to haul from one place to another.

    Of the many books, desks and toys left behind, only a portion are seen here. Hundreds more are in a back room of the school being used as an archive of sorts." - https://www.bodie.com/history/structures/bodie-schoolhouse/








    The Power Station-
    "This brick building, attached to the Wheaton and Hollis Hotel, helped bring Bodie into the 20th century. It houses transformers once used for powering the Standard Mill. You can see what is left of the white paint that covered the walls.

    Originally, the mill was run by steam power, but wood was a costly resource that was expensive and eventually became more and more scarce. Prior to November 1892, Tom Legget convinced James Cain to invest in his idea of transmitting power over a long distance. The power was to be used to in the mill, which would reduce the amount of wood needed. Cain agreed and work began. The mill had new electric equipment installed, this power substation was built, and lines were run from the mill to the substation, and from the substation to Green Creek, where the Hydroelectric Power Plant was built. In fact, the lines were run 13 miles in a straight line! At the time, engineers were afraid the power running through the lines would not be able to turn sharp corners and that it would ‘jump out of the line and into the ground’.

    Local newspapers and residents thought the whole idea was crazy and wouldn’t work. They had been calling the whole operation “Legget’s Follie” and expected the worst. Thousands and thousands of dollars had were being spent to build buildings, run lines, purchase, and install equipment at the mill. It was a big deal in Bodie.

    So, November 1892 a large group of people met at the mill for the magical moment. A signal was sent via telephone line to Green Creek, and the switch was thrown. Nothing happened. People began laughing and chattering, believing that they had been right all along. Several minutes passed, and suddenly the motors at the mill began to hum! What an exciting moment!!

    Bodie became the first town (in the world?) to have an electric stamp mill! A huge party was thrown that night and everyone celebrated this new technology and the further success of Bodie." - https://www.bodie.com/history/structures/hydro-electric-power-substation/












     
    Last edited:

    suse66

    When you wish upon a star, your dreams come true!
    Joined
    Sep 3, 2008
    Wow! I can't believe how much of the town is intact! I wonder what caused it to be deserted so quickly? You are certainly seeing so many interesting places.

    I have a report going for my trip with Jack this summer. Come on over when you have a minute! :)

     

    Steppesister

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Dec 27, 2013
    Wow! I can't believe how much of the town is intact! I wonder what caused it to be deserted so quickly? You are certainly seeing so many interesting places.

    I have a report going for my trip with Jack this summer. Come on over when you have a minute! :)

    I know!! It's really amazing!

    I think they just saw the ore vein dry up and left for "golder" pastures. I have so many more places to show you too!

    I will hop on over and sub in right now! I'm on call all weekend and trying to catch up on sleep when I can, but I can start reading for sure!! Thanks for the heads up; I'm so very behind on EVERY thread I'm following or want to. :hug:
     

    Steppesister

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Dec 27, 2013
    OF COURSE YOU DID! Congrats!!!!:banana::banana::banana::cheer2:
    It's certainly been a challenge so far!
    Hey there! So fun to see you here too!
    Yes!!

    And the celebration is for 18 months. I'm pretty sure there will be more.
    Exactly!

    It's been so long since I've been here regularly, I have forgotten how to quote properly, I think - my comments are inserted above. :)
    They were and I'll try to go back and capture some of them and pull them to here.

    Glad you had a good time - looking forward to seeing your thoughts.
    My thoughts will have to be abbreviated for a spell while I wrap my energies up into this new job. :)
    There are some good displays in the museum depicting the lives as they were then. Pretty cool.
    Wish we'd have had time to see it.
    Liesa and Zach were great houseguests - just wish we had more time to visit!
    :goodvibes:
    Nothing makes sense anymore.
    Nope. All completely upside down.
    Sounds like things are falling into place - glad to hear it. How is Zach liking his new job and apartment?
    Slowly, yes! :) He is liking it a lot. He got put onto full time already and will be starting that next week. His roommates are all solid guys which makes me worry less. It's a nice 3 bedroom house with a small common area and kitchen. He shares a bath with one of the guys.
     

    Steppesister

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Dec 27, 2013
    I'm so glad you got to do this trip together. An epic memory for the two of you!


    @MAGICFOR2

    It really was!! I hope he remembers it for a long time!

    We have been enduring this for several years now. This is due to laws enacted by those who don't live here, don't work in the forest and know nothing about it. We are no longer allowed to manage the forests, so they burn like this when lightening strikes. Horrible mis-management.

    This!!



    Cute souvie of ....Mexico! :rotfl2: Oh well, I'm glad it made Zach happy!

    RIGHT?!! I did try to tell him, but he wouldn't listen that he'd see so MUCH more!

    Jim's HS mascot - Fighting Pelicans!!! :)

    For reals?!! :lmao:



    I tried to tell him to let you put your own salad dressing on

    I actually had put my own on, but it was SOOOOO spicy that even just the tiny bit I did wrecked the whole thing!

    I tried to tell him to let you put your own salad dressing on
    Well, I'm glad you survived! :) I'm sorry your SA day was a bust. At least you saw a little of it!
    I wouldn't say it was a bust per se; we did do a few fun things despite my mosquito bite issue.

    Lots of sad history - Wendy - JordanYost's cousin shared that her grandparents were in those camps. I believe her parents were actually children there. It is important to remember the mistakes of the past so it doesn't get repeated, however ugly.
    Captain Jack and his tribe is another tragic story,
    I see you found the petroglyphs! I know you have to take the back road to see them - I don't think I ever have..
    That is crazy that I know of someone with a direct connection there. WOW! And yes, omitting it because it's sad or hard or unsavory isn't the right response. :/

    Yes, we did. There certainly may be more out there that we didn't find, but the ones we did sure were exciting to see!!
     

    Steppesister

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Dec 27, 2013
    Not much of a story.
    We bought a house and only later found out that the former owner had gone bankrupt. For a while we kept getting his mail… including bills. One day a Marshall came a callin’ looking for him.
    Well, that's certainly not something that happens everyday!
     


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