Ideas about store electronic carts

Discussion in 'disABILITIES!' started by SpiritedHaunts, Aug 8, 2018 at 5:36 PM.

  1. SpiritedHaunts

    SpiritedHaunts Mouseketeer

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2008
    Messages:
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    I would like some help on using in store carts. We regularly visit Target and I use a cat while mom, who should also be using one, uses a bit buggy.

    Often I have had to get one or two carts because they die on me. Is there any advice to help? Should I turn it off while looking at items? Or keep it on?

    They have older bigger cars that I have actually moved moved displays with. These are not as easy to maneuver but seem to last longer. The other newer carts are way faster, can turn around in most isles but run out of power very quickly.

    Any advise? I have to use a cane when I leave the house or at home even if neededIn.I have a rollator for when I am going to have to wait line or be at our bookstore for awhile.

    Also, I met a woman who was in a small scorer she said she got off amazon. It was a two word name that was something like future and mechanical. I fear I may be needing my own. I'd like to see if there are any small, portable cart that I can tool around in. But how could that work in a store or just to even hold my bag (s).

    As you can tell I need a lot of help in this transition. All and any advice is definitely welcomed.
     
  2. kaytieeldr

    kaytieeldr Post hoc, ergo propter hoc

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2005
    Messages:
    41,976
    I would say take it up with Target. I think they have only two carts*, so can't let them fully charge between users. Or it might be time to investigate purchasing your own.

    *At least my local Target and Wal-Mart each only had two when I needed them. No
     
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  3. mamabunny

    mamabunny DIS Veteran

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2012
    Messages:
    1,550
    I agree with @kaytieeldr - it sounds like the newer, faster carts are more popular, and so they aren't getting enough "down" time to fully charge. That, and often customers don't take a moment to do the simple courtesy of plugging the store scooter back in so that it charges (even a little bit). Our local Target & Wal-Mart stores have nearly 2 dozen of these carts between the two of them, but on a weekend there will literally be folks sitting on the benches at the front of the stores, waiting for someone to bring one back.

    You need to approach your local Target management and let them know that you require the scooter to shop, and that they frequently are not useable because they are not being allowed to recharge.

    Yes - turning off the cart when you are stopped for any amount of time will help the battery last longer. Additionally, planning your trip through the store (so that you don't have to backtrack, or go back and forth across the entire store multiple times) will help. Use common sense to your advantage as well - for example, plan your trip around the store so that you pick up the heaviest items last (like a case of water bottles) and you aren't carrying the heaviest stuff around the longest.

    But at the end of the day, you may have to rely upon the store to insure that the carts are being kept in a useable condition. Remember that these are considered to be a "courtesy cart" - they are NOT required to offer them to customers as an accommodation, and they are NOT required to do anything other than make sure that the store itself is accessible and useable by everyone. (So, handicapped parking spots, ramps to entrances if required, aisles wide enough to accomodate mobility devices, restrooms to accommodate mobility device users, assistance with shopping if required/requested and facilities that allow the customer perform (essentially) the same shopping functions as an able-bodied person).

    If you have arrived at a point where you require the use of a motorized store cart to shop, you may want to consider purchasing a lightweight scooter that you can take wherever you want. Because I own my own personal scooter, I never have to worry about the condition of the store carts anymore; and I can go and do things at places where a "courtesy" or rental cart is typically not available, like art museums, small local festivals, tourist attractions, etc.
     
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