How To Slow Down?

trubgerg

Earning My Ears
Joined
Dec 14, 2017
When you go to the parks with people who don't keep up with you, what do you do to make sure you don't annoy them too much?

I ask this as a 42 year old with no kids who has to constantly stop and look back for his parents. I still have the energy to get to wherever I want to go in the parks, but when I'm with them I make sure I slow down so I don't get too far ahead. The last time I was there with them they were both using telescoping metal walking sticks to help with back pain, so as long as I heard the tapping of the walking sticks I knew they were within range.

But aside from literally slowing down your walking speed, what are some ideas for making sure our not-so-fast family members can keep up and have fun without feeling like they're being rushed?
 

Meglen

DIS Veteran
Joined
Jul 16, 2016
Maybe rent scooters? Other than that it's just the way it is. Also if they want to take it slow and you don't maybe split up for a bit ? Let them shop around while you go do a few things.
 

LuvMyEAR

Mouseketeer
Joined
Sep 23, 2009
I understand completely, from both sides! I started my love affair with Disney Parks at 40, with lots of energy and a “brisk“ touring style, not to mention that I wanted to rope drop AND close a park every day. Fast forward to 65... with a few health issues for good measure and I now feel like the anchor dragging on the ground. We have done trips with grandchildren, starting at ages 3, as well as 2 trips with my mother, who made her first WDW at 89! Now, those super-fit grandchildren do everything at warp speed, and while we don’t want to slow them down, we do want to spend time with them.

The most important thing is to set expectations and have everyone on board. Plan what you will do together, as well as time apart. Be realistic about it. If “shopping on Main St” is something you all enjoy, take into consideration what that means. DH really likes to shop, but only for men’s clothing and maybe Christmas ornaments. DD and I like to linger over every display of sparkly things, as well as lots of other stuff. We can easily spend an hour in the Emporium or MouseGear. Those are 5-10 min stops for DH. He is happy to rest his feet and rehydrate while we browse. DSIL and sons will be in a line for an attraction. It’s all good!

We find this “separate and regroup” style fits well. Are your parents comfortable navigating on their own? Do you have at least 2 cell phones along? If so, things are much easier. Once inside the park, reassure your folks that they can set their own pace and enjoy whatever catches their fancy. Explain where you are headed and pick a spot for a rendezvous-vous. Tell them not to hesitate to call or text if they get diverted or stop for a snack as you might like to join them. We always make a point to eat and do specific attractions together.

ECVs are wonderful, however they can be daunting in the heavy crowds. I have used them myself and they are great for keeping up with a group. Often, I am the leader, as they do attractions that no longer interest me. (Tomorrowland Speedway - I am done with you!) I will move on to a vantage point to watch, and let them catch up to me. On the whole, young and energetic ones can definitely move much faster through a crowd than an ECV, but an ECV will let you take a longer, less crowded route without sapping precious energy.

If a day of walking is painful for one or both of your parents, an ECV is a game changer. Or a wheelchair, if you are willing to push. That certainly keeps you together. It could be that one wheelchair would help, with your parents doing a walk/ride share in order to let them go longer without discomfort. Of course, that would absolutely tie you to the slowest walker’s speed.

I am sure your parents will enjoy their trip best if they are neither rushed nor feeling like they are holding you back. Hope it is a wonderful time for all of you!
 
  • DisneyOma

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jul 27, 2015
    When you go to the parks with people who don't keep up with you, what do you do to make sure you don't annoy them too much?

    I ask this as a 42 year old with no kids who has to constantly stop and look back for his parents. I still have the energy to get to wherever I want to go in the parks, but when I'm with them I make sure I slow down so I don't get too far ahead. The last time I was there with them they were both using telescoping metal walking sticks to help with back pain, so as long as I heard the tapping of the walking sticks I knew they were within range.

    But aside from literally slowing down your walking speed, what are some ideas for making sure our not-so-fast family members can keep up and have fun without feeling like they're being rushed?
    Why not just literally slow down your walking speed? Why focus on them keeping up when it is within your power to slow down?
     

    Turksmom

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Mar 2, 2018
    Why not just literally slow down your walking speed? Why focus on them keeping up when it is within your power to slow down?
    It's really difficult to do that if you are naturally a fast walker. I often joke that after every 5 paces, I'll take 2 in reverse, so I don't lose the rest of my party.

    I can't really help the OP, as I haven't found a solution either.
     
  • OKW Lover

    Retired and living 2 miles from The Castle.
    DIS Lifetime Sponsor
    Joined
    Apr 29, 2004
    Good suggestions above. Another option is to agree on a meeting place. Something like, "I'll see you in the UK pavilion in 10 minutes".
     

    _19disnA

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Aug 8, 2018
    I think you need to be sensitive to the others you are with when on vacation. Disney involves a LOT of walking and someone who is 25+ yrs older probably won't be able to walk as fast/far as someone much younger. Perhaps agree to split up at times since some in your group may want to spend time shopping or checking out various exhibits. The vacation will be a lot more enjoyable if some aren't exhausted trying to keep up with others who are younger and/or used to walking long distances.
     

    DisLiss

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    May 2, 2018
    When I am with a parent who walks slower than I do, I allow them to take the lead. Then they never feel like they are slowing me down because they are never watching me get farther and farther in front of them, nor do I have to keep checking to be sure they are near, because I'm right behind them and can see them.

    This also allows them to point out things they want to do or see and it allows me to more easily notice if they seem interested in something or if they seem to be tiring and need a rest.
     
  • bakerworld

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    May 24, 2010
    When you go to the parks with people who don't keep up with you, what do you do to make sure you don't annoy them too much?

    I ask this as a 42 year old with no kids who has to constantly stop and look back for his parents. I still have the energy to get to wherever I want to go in the parks, but when I'm with them I make sure I slow down so I don't get too far ahead. The last time I was there with them they were both using telescoping metal walking sticks to help with back pain, so as long as I heard the tapping of the walking sticks I knew they were within range.

    But aside from literally slowing down your walking speed, what are some ideas for making sure our not-so-fast family members can keep up and have fun without feeling like they're being rushed?
    Seriously, tell them you'll meet them for dinner. If they're any fun at all, you could meet them for a drink :).

    I'm 63 and well aware I cannot walk as fast as my 38yo.
     

    StageTek

    It's kind of fun to do the impossible.
    Joined
    Apr 20, 2007
    It's really difficult to do that if you are naturally a fast walker.
    Sometimes it's important to do something that is difficult in order to make others comfortable.
    But aside from literally slowing down your walking speed, what are some ideas for making sure our not-so-fast family members can keep up and have fun without feeling like they're being rushed?
    I have no other ides. Literally slowing down your walking speed is the only way I know of to make sure your no-so-fast family members are not feeling rushed.

    Allow them to take the lead and enjoy the park at their speed. Who knows? You may see and experience things you miss when you are walking at your normal speed. At the very least you will make your no-so-fast family members happy. I can't see any downsides to that.
     

    Disney Frenhines

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Aug 28, 2013
    All walk together at their pace, but, have times where your parents can sit and people watch or enjoy a snack and you can have maybe ab hour to head off to do what you want. Doing this several times during the day may be an idea. There is nothing better than taking time out just to watch the world go by sitting on a bench. It is all about compromise and they won't be alone.
     

    seashoreCM

    All around nice guy.
    Joined
    Aug 25, 2001
    Very bad to make someone who is healing from an injury or who is a little ill or who has shorter legs (read: child) to have to hustle to keep up with you and get all hot and sweaty trying to do so.
     

    Turksmom

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Mar 2, 2018
    Sometimes it's important to do something that is difficult in order to make others comfortable.
    Maybe I'm really bad at walking because I have trouble maintaining a slower pace and either speed up without thinking or stumble over my own feet. Nobody in my family is uncomfortable with it. I don't mind if they walk at their own pace and I don't mind meeting them or waiting a little further ahead. I'm not tapping my foot or yelling,"Move it!". They think it's funny that I'm the speedy one because I'm also much shorter than the rest.
     

    DVCkidsMOM

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    May 29, 2003
    I'm really glad there are a few ideas above.
    Sometimes it's important to do something that is difficult in order to make others comfortable. ...
    From 10+ years leading backpacking groups, I want to defend the OP. I have observed repeatedly that it is often JUST as painful to slow a fast pace as it is to "have to keep up." I'm sure there is a range of normal-ish paced walkers who can slow down as needed and only be slightly out of their comfort or preferred zone, but there really are people for whom slowing down is extremely uncomfortable. The walk and wait at an agreed upon location works best for us, with some "you do you while I do me and we'll meet in a few hours" sprinkled in. Good luck to the OP.
     

    trubgerg

    Earning My Ears
    Joined
    Dec 14, 2017
    Thanks for the replies.

    I certainly wander off when my parents sit down for a 10 minute break, but I don't want to split up for long periods of time. And there are sit down things we enjoy... the Baseline Tap House and the beer stand outside of the American Adventure pavilion are two of our favorite places to get a beer and people watch.
     

    StageTek

    It's kind of fun to do the impossible.
    Joined
    Apr 20, 2007
    Ya'll are making my point for me. Thank you.

    Yep, sometimes it's uncomfortable, sometimes extremely uncomfortable to so something that makes others comfortable. And most of the time doing that is a caring, compassionate thing to do.
     



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