Does anyone have a picture of the manual wheelchairs they rent at Disney?

KarenP64

Mouseketeer
Joined
Mar 16, 2016
I wanted to see if you can purchase one somewhere (like Amazon). I rode in one when we were there in 2014, but I don't have any pictures to see what exactly they look like. I realize they would have very rugged wheels to make it easy for someone to push around the park all done. Any assistance/photos would be very helpful! Thank you!
 

RaySharpton

Retired and going to Disney.
Joined
Oct 28, 2000
https://disneyworld.disney.go.com/guest-services/wheelchair-rentals/

Wheelchair Rentals
For Guests requiring assistance, wheelchairs are available for rent at all Walt Disney World theme and water parks as well as Disney Springs.

For more information, please contact Disability Services at (407) 560-2547 or email disability.services@disneyparks.com.


Price


Walt Disney World Theme Parks
  • Daily: $12
  • Length of Stay (multi-day): $10 per day
Walt Disney World Water Park and Disney Springs
  • Daily: $12
  • A refundable $100 deposit is required at these locations.
Daily rentals are transferable between all locations. You pay just once for the day.

Length of Stay Rentals are transferable between Disney theme parks only. If you’ll require a wheelchair for a multiday visit, you can save time and money by pre-paying for all days at the first theme park you visit. Please note that Length of Stay rental tickets may not be available during peak periods.

When Leaving Your Location
Wheelchairs may not be removed from the destination where they were rented. When exiting your location, simply return your wheelchair to the rental counter. If you’re at a Disney water park or Disney Springs, your deposit will be returned at this time. When you visit your next destination, present your rental receipt to secure another wheelchair, if available.

Know Before You Go

  • Wheelchairs are available on a first-come, first served basis.
  • Reservations are not accepted, and quantities are limited. Please plan to arrive early.
  • Guests must be 18 years of age to rent wheelchairs. A photo ID is required.
  • The maximum weight is 350 pounds. Wheelchairs are not designed to hold more than one person.
  • You are welcome to bring and use your own wheelchair throughout Walt Disney World Resort.


A long time ago before using a scooter and wheelchair and just using a walking cane, I tried using a wheelchair from the parks and it was very, very difficult to roll it by myself.




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  • Staren

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    May 24, 2017
    Having used these chairs myself, I would strongly agree with @RaySharpton. These are not great wheelchairs for pushing yourself. I don't know most wheelchair models by sight, but there are a couple of brands that use very similar generic hospital grade designs. A few that come to mind are Drive Medical, Invacare, and Medline. These kinds of chairs are available on Amazon in the $150 - $250 range. Now, these kinds of chairs will get the job done, but they are not what anyone in the know would consider good wheelchairs for a lot of reasons. That's a lot more involved of a conversation though, and the price jumps pretty quickly. What I would consider an acceptable, but not good chair starts around $600 and it goes up from there.
     

    KarenP64

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    Mar 16, 2016
    Thank you so much, everyone!! That's extremely helpful! Actually, I wasn't going to push it myself; my husband pushed me when we rented them on our 2014 trip. After that trip, I bought one of those low priced wheelchairs to use around town but found they are not good at all for theme parks/zoos, etc. because the front wheel is so small & they don't have that big, cushiony rubber on the wheels like the WDW ones do. Those pictures really helped me see what the difference is! But I haven't seen on Amazon a wheelchair like this with that thick rubber. Anyone know if that is sold anywhere in the $200-ish range online? Thanks again for all the assistance!!
     

    RaySharpton

    Retired and going to Disney.
    Joined
    Oct 28, 2000
    I have no experience with buying a wheelchair except for renting, only one time, a wheelchair at the EPCOT park to use for myself and with no one to push me. But I thought that this information might help you make a decision when searching.

    The
    Invacare Tracer
    wheelchair shown below has been discontinued. But, I thought the other info might help you.


    Wheelchair Wheel Choices

    Selecting the right wheel components can have a profound effect on the performance, maneuverability and comfort of your wheelchair.

    There is more to a wheel than just being the part of the wheelchair that gets you from point A to point B. How and where you use your chair will make a difference in which wheel accessories you will want on your chair.

    Wheelchairs typically have two sets of wheels – two large ones in the back and two smaller ones in the front. However, some everyday and specialized sports (e.g., tennis) wheelchairs have only one small wheel in the front and some high-end power wheelchairs have three sets of wheels (six altogether)!

    A wheel consists of theses components: tire, rim, pushrim, spokes or MAGs, and a hub. The tire is the only part of the wheel that makes contact with the ground. It is not uncommon for manual wheelchair riders to have a couple sets of tires to accommodate for season or climate changes.

    For most manual wheelchairs that you self-propel, the rear wheels are the largest. The rear wheels are generally referred to as the "drive wheels" because they have pushrims attached to the rims of the tires that are used to help push the wheelchair forward.


    Invacare Tracer: Urethane rear tires, mounted on "no flex" wheels, offer superior performance.

    Wheelchairs designed for an attendant or caregiver to propel (typically seen in a hospital or long-term care facility) may have larger tires in the front since there is no need for "drive wheels." This feature inhibits you from being able to independently propel your own wheelchair.

    There are several factors to consider when choosing the most suitable wheel and tire configuration for your wheelchair. Many wheelchair frames cannot be modified to accept all the sizes of wheels and tires that are available. Therefore, if you are replacing a wheel, you should check your purchase record to determine the specific configurations available for your particular model wheelchair. The wheelchair’s serial number should help you find the right tires if you have not changed from the original wheel configuration that came from the factory. It is also helpful to have the seat width and depth as well as the frame color of your chair to make sure that SpinLife.com has the right wheelchair information from the factory.


    What’s Suitable For You?

    The tires are what can go flat and what can make your ride more or less shock proof. There are two classes of tires -- pneumatic (air) and puncture-proof -- and how you use and where you ride your chair will help you decide which is right for you.

    Indoor vs. Outdoor

    Indoor:

    Smooth, lightly treaded, skinny tire for ease of mobility

    Outdoor:

    Medium knobby tread, wider, for better traction





    Pneumatic Tires

    These are commonly made of rubber and require an inner tube which is filled with air to a recommended pressure (pounds per square inch or psi).

    If you want higher performance, a combined tube and tire (e.g. sew-up) or a Kevlar® (material used to make bulletproof vests) tire with a high-pressure tube (e.g., 180 psi) may be more desirable.

    Pneumatic tires are widely used on most manual and power wheelchairs because they are generally lighter, shock-absorbing and offer good traction on most terrain types.

    While pneumatic tires are the most popular kind, they require the highest degree of maintenance. This is because the air insert consists of a thin liner that can be easily punctured by thorns, nails or other sharp objects that penetrate through the tire. With these tires, you must always be prepared for encountering a flat-tire, especially if you spend a lot of time outdoors. You can learn to change your own tire, or you can go to a local bike-shop, attendant or friend who is familiar with bike and/or wheelchair maintenance. In addition, you must keep a close eye on maintaining the appropriate pressure level since air tends to leak out of the pneumatic tires over time. Tires need to be replaced when the tread on the tires have become worn or cracked. If the inner air tubes have been punctured, they can be reused if you patch the tear with a "patch kit" but should be replaced every couple months to reduce the incidence of flats due to wear.

    Puncture-Proof Tires

    These are made of rubber or plastic (e.g., usually polyurethane). The rubber puncture-proof tires are similar to the pneumatic kind, but the inner tube consists of a solid material such as foam, plastic or rubber. These tires are essentially flat-free and require less maintenance then the pneumatic rubber tires. However, a single solid insert is generally heavier by an average of 1.5 times that of a single pneumatic insert. The combined difference in weight between having two pneumatic inserts and two solid inserts is approximately two to four pounds depending on the material. While this doesn’t seem like very much, this additional weight can have a significant impact when it comes to transporting and propelling the wheelchair. They are also stiffer (not as shock-absorbing) and tend not to grip the ground as well. These features may adversely affect the performance of your wheelchair if you spend time outdoors in slippery conditions, if you commonly travel up and down inclined surfaces and/or if you propel upon rough and/or rocky terrain.

    Replacing a solid insert can be very difficult to do on your own and should be taken to an authorized service center. Unfortunately servicing a wheel can be expensive. Most wheelchair dealers will charge by the hour and the cost ranges from $30 to $50 per hour. Changing a tire with a solid insert takes a little longer than a pneumatic insert so you can expect the cost for service to be higher. Bicycle shops can also provide repair or installation services on most wheelchair wheels and tires and are generally more economical. Labor costs are around $5 to $10 to change an insert.

    There are also puncture-proof tires that consist of a solid plastic (no inserts). These tires are generally the least expensive but are also low performance, greatly reducing your comfort and can become damaged rather easily. Solid plastic tires are commonly found on depot (hospital) wheelchairs that are designed for indoor usage.

    New technologies have enabled puncture-proof tires to become more lightweight and comfortable for the user while still providing for longer wear times. These tires typically are constructed of a semi-pneumatic foam and/or rubber combination and come in various tread designs and sizes.

    Pneumatic tires and tubes are the most inexpensive combination to purchase. For a standard 24" x 1 3/8" or 1 1/4" tire (most common rear tire size for self-propelling manual wheelchairs) prices range from $10 to $45 per tire and mostly depends on the materials they’re made of. The more inexpensive tires are made of a lower grade rubber with simple wire reinforcing bead (holds the tire inside the rim edges). The more expensive tires are made out of a higher quality rubber while reinforcing on the sidewalls and bead is made out of a Kevlar® material. Tires with heavy tread and high-pressure tires tend to be more expensive also. The costs of pneumatic tubes also depend on material. A standard rubber tube can cost anywhere from $3 to $7. A pneumatic tube consisting of a higher-grade lighter-weight material such as latex is around $20 each. The solid and semi-pneumatic tires and inserts are in the range of $10 to $50 each. In general, puncture-proof inserts made of hard plastic are cheaper than those made of foam.

    Tires are available in many different tread designs and widths to accommodate almost any type of terrain, as well as your mobility needs. Treads range from very smooth to extremely knobby, such as those typically seen on high performance mountain bikes. The smoother the tread and the skinnier the tire, the less rolling resistance you will have. The lesser the resistance, the lesser the force or energy that is required to push your wheelchair. If you spend a majority of time indoors, a smooth to lightly treaded skinny tire is most desirable. However, if you spend a lot of time outdoors, a wider tire with a medium knobby tread is more appropriate so you have better traction on rough surfaces. There are special tread designs and widths available for traversing over snow, dirt, turf and grass.

    Power wheelchair users tend to have medium treads and thicker tires on all the wheels to accommodate many different surfaces and the weight of the wheelchair/user. Smooth treads aren’t a consideration since rolling resistance is not a problem when the wheelchair is powered with electronics verses "human" power.

    The most common rear tire diameters for manual wheelchairs are 22, 24, and 26 inches for adults. Tire sizes for pediatric wheelchairs and power wheelchairs are smaller. Many manual wheelchairs are equipped to support only a couple different wheel diameters. The most appropriate diameter is determined by how long your arms are and how high (or low) you sit in your chair. You should be able to easily reach the entire upper half of the pushrim without bending forward, without hunching your shoulders, and without flexing your elbow too far outward.


    Frog Legs Suspension Casters place a polymer shock absorber at the point where the most vibration occurs.
    Casters
    The front tires on a wheelchair are generally referred to as casters and are necessary for steering and maneuvering the wheelchair. Smaller casters provide for greater foot clearance and agility but are more apt to get stuck in bumps or cause forward falls. They are often found on high performance, ultralight and sports wheelchairs. The smallest casters available for manual wheelchairs are approximately 3 inches in diameter and are the same kind used on most "in-line" skates. Casters are found to be as large as 8 inches in wheelchairs designed for daily use. The larger casters can provide you with more security since they wheel over changes in surface height more easily. Like the rear tires, casters can be either pneumatic or solid (usually made of polyurethane). The polyurethane casters are durable but don’t offer you as much comfort as the pneumatic tires.



    Pneumatic Tires - Pros and Cons

    Pros

    • More lightweight
    • More shock absorbing
    • Good traction on most terrain

    Cons

    • High maintenance
    • Air insert has thin liner that can be easily punctured by sharp object
    • Maintain PSI since air tends to leak out over time
    • Inner air tubes should be replaced every 3-4 months depending on usage to reduce potential for flats due to wear
    • Replace outer tire 6-9 months when tread appears worn or cracked.


    Puncture Proof Tires - Pros and Cons

    Pros

    • Essentially flat-free
    • Requires less maintenance (the same pair of solid inserts can be used over and over again)

    Cons

    • Heavier
    • Less shock absorbing
    • Replacement can be costly and difficult
    As I have mentioned before, I have no experience in manual wheelchairs, but here is some info at Spinlife.com.

    Weight Weight Capacity Overall Width Legrest Options Seat to Floor Heights Warranty
    34 lbs. 250 lbs. 22.5" to 30.5" Swing Away ,
    Elevating 17.5" to 19.5" 5 Year Limited
    Weight Weight Capacity Overall Width Legrest Options Seat to Floor Heights Warranty
    31 lbs. 250 lbs. 21" to 29" Fixed ,
    Swing Away ,
    Elevating 14.5" to 19.5" 5 Year Limited
    Weight Weight Capacity Overall Width Legrest Options Seat to Floor Heights Warranty
    33 lbs. 250 lbs. 23" to 27" Fixed ,
    Swing Away ,
    Elevating 17.5" to 19.5" 5 Year Limited
    Weight Weight Capacity Quick-Ship Overall Width Legrest Options Warranty
    25 lbs. 250 lbs. Yes 23" to 27" Swing Away ,
    Elevating Lifetime Limited
    Weight Weight Capacity Overall Width Legrest Options Seat to Floor Heights Warranty
    28 lbs. 250 lbs. 21.5" to 27.5" Swing Away ,
    Elevating 13" to 20.5" Lifetime Limited
    Weight Weight Capacity Overall Width Legrest Options Seat to Floor Height Warranty
    29 lbs. 250 lbs. 24" to 26" Swing Away ,
    Elevating 20.00" Lifetime Limited
    Weight Weight Capacity Quick-Ship Overall Width Legrest Options Warranty
    19 lbs. 220 lbs. Yes 27" Swing Away Lifetime Limited
    Weight Weight Capacity Overall Width Legrest Options Seat to Floor Heights Warranty
    28 lbs. 250 lbs. 20" to 28" Swing Away ,
    Elevating 15" to 19.5" Lifetime Limited
     

    Staren

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    May 24, 2017
    This is the main thing with wheelchair tires. The stock tires on pretty much any wheelchair are junk. You can either go to somewhere like Spinlife or SportAid to buy a chair with your choice of tires, or you can buy a chair and take it to a bike shop. Most of these cheaper chairs are not set up for air filled tires, but solid no flat bike tires can usually be swapped in. Actually got myself through Boy Scouts back in the day with that trick.
     
  • Groot

    Still recovering from the events of Endgame.
    Joined
    Aug 24, 2018
    I’d be careful with getting a generic manual chair. From my experience, the ones at Disney, after heavy use, at least one of the rear wheels, or casters, or BOTH tend to go flat pretty quick. Also, with those rear wheels, pushing them up a hill is daunting and the armrests can sometimes impede your ability to self push. I’d recommend getting a manual chair that has armrests that are removable or one that you can have the option of not getting any armrests at all.

    If you can, there are some PORTABLE folding powerchairs that can fit inside your car trunk that’ll make getting around easier. (Like the Fold and Go.) But the only thing is, these chairs can weigh as much as 55 lbs. (24.94 kilograms). But luckily, Fold and Go is currently developing a chair lift so that getting the chair in and out of the car much easier. (Another thing, Fold and Go is the ONLY WATERPROOF powerchair on the market.)

    Now, I know a powerchair is more expensive, but when all you have to do is push a joystick with 1 finger vs. pushing with your arms, the powerchair is worth it. (Plus some companies have layaway, rent before you buy, and other payment plans so that you can find the chair that’s right for you.)
     
  • RaySharpton

    Retired and going to Disney.
    Joined
    Oct 28, 2000
    They mentioned this on their Facebook page.
    Is it possible that you could find that info about Fold and Go Wheelchairs developing on Facebook? I looked on Facebook and their website and I couldn't find any information about a lift for their wheelchair to lift into a car. I presume to lift into the trunk. That is what I would be interested in buying. Not one of those lifts on the market that look like a construction lift that is bolted into the trunk and not something that attaches to the tailgate hitch. It would be great if they developed one.
     

    Staren

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    May 24, 2017
    And I thought we might be able to avoid the power chair vs manual chair debate in this thread. :P I personally avoid power chairs. One more thing to charge. Plus mechanical devices are generally more durable than electrical devices. Plus when they do break, they are generally easier and quicker to fix. Now this is the opinion of someone who can very easily use a manual chair.

    If someone was looking for a folding chair for long term use, I would defiantly point them in the direction of the folding ultralights by TiLite, Quickie, Motion Composites, ect. Your quality of life with these chairs compared to hospital grade goes up by magnitudes. However, they are not cheap, and they are made to measure. You are looking at paying out of pocket $1,500+ or dealing with insurance, and waiting for the build time. While I am a proponent of getting a good wheelchair if you need a wheelchair, you do need to take the realities of doing so into consideration.
     

    RaySharpton

    Retired and going to Disney.
    Joined
    Oct 28, 2000
    Hi, Staren. I am not advocating the poster to buy a power chair. I was just responding to the possibility of a lift specifically for my go and fold wheelchair. At 68 years old, I may eventually need help with lifting. Right now I don't own a car and I rarely rent a car. I really do not want to go into my personal medical reasons for not getting a manual wheelchair. If I could, that is the route of a manual chair that I would consider that you mention. Thank you for all of your advice on manual wheelchairs. No offense intended.

    And I thought we might be able to avoid the power chair vs manual chair debate in this thread. :P I personally avoid power chairs. One more thing to charge. Plus mechanical devices are generally more durable than electrical devices. Plus when they do break, they are generally easier and quicker to fix. Now this is the opinion of someone who can very easily use a manual chair.

    If someone was looking for a folding chair for long term use, I would defiantly point them in the direction of the folding ultralights by TiLite, Quickie, Motion Composites, ect. Your quality of life with these chairs compared to hospital grade goes up by magnitudes. However, they are not cheap, and they are made to measure. You are looking at paying out of pocket $1,500+ or dealing with insurance, and waiting for the build time. While I am a proponent of getting a good wheelchair if you need a wheelchair, you do need to take the realities of doing so into consideration.
     

    Staren

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    May 24, 2017
    No offense taken. The introduction to my last post was a bit of a half joke mainly in response to @Groot bringing up one specific power chair brand when up until that point the conversation had been on manual chair options. Being a social worker in the disability field along with living with a disability myself, anything that comes even close to a sales pitch for one option rubs me the wrong way. That's why I'm always careful to offer a few different brands when I talk about a type wheelchair or other mobility device.
     

    RaySharpton

    Retired and going to Disney.
    Joined
    Oct 28, 2000
    No offense taken. The introduction to my last post was a bit of a half joke mainly in response to @Groot bringing up one specific power chair brand when up until that point the conversation had been on manual chair options. Being a social worker in the disability field along with living with a disability myself, anything that comes even close to a sales pitch for one option rubs me the wrong way. That's why I'm always careful to offer a few different brands when I talk about a type wheelchair or other mobility device.
    Thank you, Staren. I am retired and for another couple of years still a Registered Respiratory Therapist. But I really don't think that I will be going back to work even PRN.

    And I plead guilty in one of my previous threads bringing up one specific electric wheelchair that I bought recently.

    I was just so excited when I used it at WDW and then buying one. So much better than my other mobility scooters.

    I'll try and be more careful when posting. Thank you again.
     

    Groot

    Still recovering from the events of Endgame.
    Joined
    Aug 24, 2018
    Is it possible that you could find that info about Fold and Go Wheelchairs developing on Facebook? I looked on Facebook and their website and I couldn't find any information about a lift for their wheelchair to lift into a car. I presume to lift into the trunk. That is what I would be interested in buying. Not one of those lifts on the market that look like a construction lift that is bolted into the trunk and not something that attaches to the tailgate hitch. It would be great if they developed one.

    8DCCEE73-DCBD-4B2E-902C-17004B28E800.jpeg
     

    mamabunny

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Oct 11, 2012
    I think the hardest part about the manual wheelchair issue at WDW is the number of folks who think they can just roll up (pun intended) and hop in that chair and self propel all over WDW.

    At MK, they get from the rental location to about the Castle Hub before it sinks in that they *might not* be able to do this for very long... And if they do manage to go longer, the next day their arms and shoulders are screaming, and probably feel like limp noodles. Most people have no idea how well conditioned your arms become when you use a chair, and how crucial the difference is between a generic rental and a custom chair, like a TiLite. (disclaimer: our daughter's chair is a TiLite)
     

    Groot

    Still recovering from the events of Endgame.
    Joined
    Aug 24, 2018
    I think the hardest part about the manual wheelchair issue at WDW is the number of folks who think they can just roll up (pun intended) and hop in that chair and self propel all over WDW.

    At MK, they get from the rental location to about the Castle Hub before it sinks in that they *might not* be able to do this for very long... And if they do manage to go longer, the next day their arms and shoulders are screaming, and probably feel like limp noodles. Most people have no idea how well conditioned your arms become when you use a chair, and how crucial the difference is between a generic rental and a custom chair, like a TiLite. (disclaimer: our daughter's chair is a TiLite)
    Or that one hill in between France and England...
     

    RaySharpton

    Retired and going to Disney.
    Joined
    Oct 28, 2000
    Thank you so much, Groot. I am so excited about this. I must be on a different Facebook page because I didn't see any of the info that you posted, but I am very grateful for you taking the time to show it to me. Thank you so much.

    Edited to say I found the posts under the Tripod Seat thread.
     
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