Disney World Prices indexed by CPI and Minimum Wage

Discussion in 'The DIS Unplugged Podcast' started by Lance J, Apr 21, 2019.

  1. Lance J

    Lance J Earning My Ears

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    I few weeks ago on the pod cast the topic of increasing prices of WDW tickets and how does it compare to prices of yester year. From a few other Disney themed sites, the Census Bauru and some math. I came up with a few findings.
    If the Minimum Wage kept up with inflation from 1971 to now, it would be $10.04 an hour, as opposed to $7.25 currently.
    If a one day most expensive ticket kept that pave from its 1971 price is would be $39.09 as opposed to $159 currently.
    If the best annual pass kept up with inflation from 1982 to now it would be $263.42 as opposed to $994.00 currently.
    If Minimum Wage increased at the same rate as Disney World tickets from 1971 it would not be $44.24 an hour.

    [​IMG]
     
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  2. jcb

    jcb always emerging from hibernation

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    Interesting.
    I derived a slightly higher minimum wage ($10.19) when the 1971 minimum wage is adjusted for inflation using https://www.bls.gov/data/inflation_calculator.htm and the hourly rates shown on https://www.dol.gov/whd/minwage/chart.htm.

    The difference is not so significant that it throws off your other, main, points.

    A comparison to 1971 WDW prices is not easy because guests not only paid for park admission they also paid to ride each attraction. I'm not saying your numbers or assumptions are wrong. I would be interested to see what you based your calculations on.
     
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  4. Lance J

    Lance J Earning My Ears

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    I was unable to upload my sheet, or a picture of my sheet, I used the price of the highest prices ticket you could get in 71' I think it was 9 attractions. Also from 71 to late 70's there were some significant increases in minimum wages to take it from 1980 to now would be significantly higher.
     
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  5. TresGriffin

    TresGriffin Earning My Ears

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    Here’s an interesting observation I made via footage of Epcot circa 1983:

    In 1983 a 4-Day World Passport ticket (known today as a Park Hopper) was $45. Note that this was about a year after they’d abandoned the E-ticket system. In today’s dollars, $45 in 1983 is the equivalent of $115.83 in 2019.

    So, adjusted for inflation, the price of a 4-day Passport/Park Hopper in 1983 is essentially the same as a 1-day 1-park ticket in 2019.

    Now, granted, there were only 2 parks at WDW in ‘83 vs the 4 we have today, but still kinda crazy when you think of it. Disney was a lot more bang for your buck back in the day.
     
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  6. Lance J

    Lance J Earning My Ears

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    I noticed I differences in the different ticket types, some rose faster than others. I wonder what the numbers would look like when it comes to lodging cost through the years. I recall as a child staying on property was never an option due to cost, so I suspect it always been priced to exclude 50% of the population. I do enjoy staying on property, but I do acknowledge that I am not getting the quality of room the price should deserve, I’m paying for convenience of location and theme.
     
  7. TheMaxRebo

    TheMaxRebo DIS Veteran

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    I think that is an interesting comparison. I also think there was just a big evolution in tickets during the 80s (I know at one point there was a sentiment from financial people that Disney was way undercharging for their parks ... not saying the pendulum hasn't swung too far the other way, but I think some increase beyond inflation was understandable)

    If you look at the rate you site - 4 day "hopper" pass in 1983 was $45 - but 1989 that same ticket was up to $96 - so more than double in 6 years ... then by 1994 it was up to $125, so only a 30% increase over those 5 years, and by 1999 it was up to $167, about a 33% increase over those 5 years

    Then 2004 it was $202 (21% increase)
    in 2009 it was $277 (37% increase)
    in 2014 it was $354 (28% increase)
    now, in 2019 it varies by date, between $%11 and $682 - if we do a simple average that is $597 (increase of 69%)

    So you could see a bit of a market correcting in the 80s and then about a 30% increase every 5 years .. until the most recent where the average is up 69% (with the more expensive dates up even more than that)

    So 30% over 5 years is still going to outpace inflation, but seems reasonable or at leas tolerable - unlike the most recent increases
     
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  8. OKW Lover

    OKW Lover Retired and living 2 miles from The Castle. DIS Lifetime Sponsor

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    Fun to play with numbers. But what is the point? Isn't the pertinent question about value?
     
  9. Idaho Mouse

    Idaho Mouse Earning My Ears

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    I appear to be one of the only people out there that actually thinks that Disney is a good value. I was running a few numbers, if my math is correct.
    A 4 day park hopper ticket in the first week of August (the Dreams Party) is $550.06. If the parks only operate for 12 hours a day that comes out to $11.46 an hour.

    In my area a 3D movie is $14.09 or $7.05 and hour.
    A major league baseball game (for the cheapest seats) is $23 or $7.66 an hour.
    The Dreams Unlimited party in Pandora $95 or $47.50 an hour.

    I took it a step further and did a little more to save some money. I looked at the rate for a family of four (3 adult tickets, 1 child) to stay a week. A stay at All-Star Movies for 8/2-8/8/19 with a 7 day regular ticket is $3054.49.
    If you look at the stay as a whole, from the time you can check in to check out, it is $5.93 an hour per person. If you look at only open park hours it drops the price down to $9.09 an hour per person.

    I will agree that these prices are not low, but if we are considering everything that is include in general park admission I think it is actually a good value. I would pay $12 to see HEA, same with Illuminations. Not to mention parades, nighttime shows, rides, street shows, character meets, etc.
     
  10. TheMaxRebo

    TheMaxRebo DIS Veteran

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    Oh I agree with that - you get a lot for your money as there is entertainment provided for many full days . Doesn't mean the total figure isn't now a tougher nut for many families to swallow
     
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  11. MaryKatesMom

    MaryKatesMom DIS Veteran

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    My DH and I have been having the "value" discussion ever since FP+ came into existence. I think we can all agree that the crowd levels and number of resort rooms have gone up considerably in the last 10-15 yrs. Years ago EMH meant an practically empty park and a ride or two on several big ticket items. EMH is now something to avoid. We don't do Water Parks like we used to because we don't want to waste our FP because of the tiering involved.

    To achieve the same level of entertainment that used to be included I now purchase, DAH, dessert parties, EMM, dining packages and now Club Level FP.
     
  12. Louie7080

    Louie7080 Mouseketeer

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    Sorry if I missed this as part of the discussion but Disney's costs adjusted for inflation have probably gone up a lot as well?
     
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