Chronic Pain

Mittz

Earning My Ears
Joined
Jun 11, 2014
Hey everyone,

So I’ve always been a Disney fan and dreamt of the days I would be able to take my kids to the parks. Now that I have a 5 and a 2 year old my spine has finally caught up to where the doctors thought I would be as an infant. I have stabbing pain at the top of my head and neck that never goes away, and I struggle with breathing as my rib cage is so twisted my left lung can’t expand (sorry for the over share). My 5 year old really wants to take a trip to Disney, but I’m just curious how others have tackled their chronic pain issues with days at the park and ways you found to take tests throughout the day without going back to the resort. Thanks for any help!
 

gap2368

DIS Veteran
Joined
Feb 27, 2015
My friend was able to do Disney by using an ECV taking thing slow not doing any rides that would cause her pain ( like the coaster ) having her pain medication if she needed it
 

`OhanaHare

"Stitch not bad! Stitch fluffy!"
Joined
May 18, 2019
My advice is to go when it is "cooler" out in FL. That may be better for your breathing issue than the heat of May-Oct with major humidity.

Good luck, I hope you get to take your kids. :)
 
  • Mrsjvb

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Sep 5, 2007
    mid winter.. November through about February( January is a good month as it seems to be slightly less insane in the parks.) ECV or wheelchair. do NOT try commando style. pick one park and take your sweet time. Fast pass the must do rides. I always do table service in the parks for a built in break. stay on site, if you plan to do most of your trip at MK, do a monorail resort. take a day off from the parks at least once in a week long trip.
     

    theluckyrabbit

    Moderator
    Moderator
    Joined
    Jul 23, 2012
    Be willing to spend what you can to help you have an easier trip. Budget for this. Think of it as an investment in your family's memories. I've found that "penny wise and pound foolish" really is true when it comes to putting the budget ahead of my health on a Disney trip. Being virtuous with the budget wasn't doing any good when it was costing me pain and causing illness. If you do whatever you can to make the trip easier and more comfortable for yourself, you'll have more energy to pour into your family. Then they'll have a better trip and you'll have a better trip!
     

    Floppy-Dee33

    Registered
    Joined
    Jun 6, 2019
    Would it be just you going with your kids?
    I'd definitely ask a family member of friend to come along.

    I'd also say go sometime between November and February so that the heat of the summer months is not added to the already difficult situation of your chronic pain.

    Maybe an ECV is a good option for you as long as you have another adult with you to manage the kids since you cannot have them ride on it with you.

    I'm no doctor but you may want to ask your doctor about something that may help like a pain patch etc.

    If another adult cannot go with you then I'd say you need to know your limitations as far as how long you can last in the parks and how long of lines you can handle.

    Use FP+ whenever you can and in your particular case even though it is a mobility issue since you also have kids so you may not be able to use n ECV if going alone DAS may be an option for you.
     
  • kaytieeldr

    Post hoc, ergo propter hoc
    Joined
    Jun 11, 2005
    If another adult cannot go with you then I'd say you need to know your limitations as far as how long you can last in the parks and how long of lines you can handle.
    Honestly, if the OP is going without another adult and using any mobility device, I would recommend taking only the five year old. If, of course, there is somebody at home who can take care of the toddler.
     

    OurBigTrip

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    May 27, 2013
    Use FP+ whenever you can and in your particular case even though it is a mobility issue since you also have kids so you may not be able to use n ECV if going alone DAS may be an option for you.
    The DAS is there to provide accessibility to attractions for guests who can’t wait in a standard queue due to non-mobility related disabilities. It’s not there, and no one should expect to get one for, helping guests with mobility issues care for their children. OP’s mobility disability can be managed with an ECV. The childcare issue, while disability related, is up to the OP to manage, not Disney.

    OP, not saying that you would try to “game the system”, just pointing out that the DAS is not meant for mobility related issues.
     

    mamabunny

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Oct 11, 2012
    Honestly, if the OP is going without another adult and using any mobility device, I would recommend taking only the five year old. If, of course, there is somebody at home who can take care of the toddler.
    I know this sounds crazy, but I agree with @kaytieeldr for a couple of reasons here: First of all, despite popular belief, little nuggets don't really remember their first Disney trip before about the age of 5, no matter *how* Magical it is! Yes, the *parents* (and grandparents) get to make memories, but if you are taking your child so that they will have a "magical first memory"... then wait a few years until they really can enjoy it, create a permanent memory of the occasion and truly "get" the Magic.

    Secondly, WDW really isn't great for littles. When you think about it, if they are riding in a stroller, all they see are butts, and it's *really* hot down there by the asphalt. If they are walking, all they see are butts, and it's still really hot down there by the asphalt. And even if they are being carried, and can theoretically see better, how much can they really understand of everything around them? Yes, they could well recognize specific characters in isolated instances, but overall, it's just chaotic and sweaty and possibly scary for a little one.

    People will always bring their babies and little ones to WDW - I know that. And I know I am in the minority for making our daughter wait until the ripe old age of 10. But she agrees with me now (15 years later) that she can actually remember the excitement, the amazement, and the Magic from her first trip.
     

    kaytieeldr

    Post hoc, ergo propter hoc
    Joined
    Jun 11, 2005
    And I know I am in the minority for making our daughter wait until the ripe old age of 10.
    Ha! Ten is nothing! My parents made us wait until we were adults and could afford to go on our own!

    My mom's best friend was a Disney fanatic, so my parents went several times. Never even once suggested taking any of (the many of) us kids.
     
  • SirDuff

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Mar 19, 2014
    Use FP+ whenever you can and in your particular case even though it is a mobility issue since you also have kids so you may not be able to use n ECV if going alone DAS may be an option for you.
    How would a DAS help? If anything, it would make things worse since there'd be a lot more walking (the OP would need to take both kids with her to get a return time, then leave, then come back to ride) and needing to control the kids in an open environment.
     

    Selket

    Been there - done that
    Joined
    Feb 28, 2000
    I’m just curious how others have tackled their chronic pain issues with days at the park and ways you found to take tests throughout the day without going back to the resort. Thanks for any help!
    As I'm sure you know, there's not much rest with little ones! :) It would help if you posted back with info on whether you have another adult or older teen who can travel with you to watch the little ones and help you out. If so it would of course be a lot easier since you could take breaks to rest at First Aid; you could rent an ECV while someone else pushed a stroller for the little ones, etc.

    There's also the option to hire someone to help you out in the parks or to watch the children in the room. Disney suggests this: https://disneyworld.disney.go.com/guest-services/child-care-services/. I'm betting there are other agencies in Orlando who also will send someone out to be a "mother's helper" or to babysit - perhaps check the Family board here for recommendations. That would definitely add some cost to the trip but it could definitely be helpful.

    Staying closer to the MK would be ideal - it's probably the park your kids would enjoy the most going by their ages. The CR has a walkway which isn't bad but any of the monorail resorts would keep you off the busses - and allow easier access to the MK for going back and forth to the room. If you have someone to take the kids then you could always go back to rest. Definitely you'd want to get fast passes to minimize wait times in lines - and I have had good luck with the "refresh" strategy of getting additional fast passes after I've used the first 3. There's more info on that on the Theme Park board.

    Any additional info you have (another adult traveling with you? would an ECV help?) would be useful.
     

    mamabunny

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Oct 11, 2012
    Ha! Ten is nothing! My parents made us wait until we were adults and could afford to go on our own!

    My mom's best friend was a Disney fanatic, so my parents went several times. Never even once suggested taking any of (the many of) us kids.
    I think your parents and my parents had the same kind of parenting style! LOL
     

    theluckyrabbit

    Moderator
    Moderator
    Joined
    Jul 23, 2012
    One big plus about waiting to do a trip with older kids is that the kids will be able to help, and the older the kids = more help. They'll be able to help carry things, help with lines, help by remembering details so that mom doesn't have to remember everything by herself, take themselves to the restroom and help mom with any restroom needs, etc. Just a thought...
     

    Bjkandma

    Earning My Ears
    Joined
    Apr 29, 2019
    Of you are the only adult going, I would recommend that you wait and go when youngest one is fully potty trained and a little independent. I'm handicapped, in scooter and took granddaughter when she was six. She was able to hold elevator doors, ask questions and understand. It was the perfect age, in my opinion. Still believed in the magic, and old enough to remember! If you still want to go there is a company called "Kids Night Out". They offer in park assistance, but it is a paid (fee per hour) and you need to pay for their park admission. Definitely not cheap!
     

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