Any tips for hearing loss

Discussion in 'disABILITIES!' started by Atilley, Feb 25, 2017.

  1. Atilley

    Atilley Mouseketeer

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    Hi. A little background I am 37 and have had a profound hearing loss in both ears for as long as I can remember. I am very good at compensating in my everyday life as I don't wear hearing aids and have been told they may not make a difference. I am not one that like to admit I have an issue either.

    Here's my problem. I just got back from Orlando (was there for a conference). This was my first solo trip and only my second time flying. I found that I can not understand a word said when the flight attendant or pilot make announcements. I also had issues with some of the ride soundtracks at Disney.

    1) does anyone have tips for flying with hearing loss? On the return flight southwest gave me priority boarding so I could sit closer to the flight attendant but then I realized you can't lip read in the dark so that didn't help as much as I thought it would. I knew there were going to be storms and was worried the entire flight I would miss an important announcement about weather/turbulence.

    2) Any tips for the rides? To be honest Small World was the worst for me. It just sounded like constant mumbling. I hate knowing there are words and not being able to decifer what they are. I feel like I'm not getting the whole story.
     
  2. lanejudy

    lanejudy Moderator Moderator

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    WDW offers a few services for hearing disabilities. Some shows will have American Sign Language interpreters; I believe there's a set schedule. Or they offer assisted listening and handheld captioning devices that might help you. You can stop by Guest Relations for the devices.

    Here is the website page about accommodations offered: https://disneyworld.disney.go.com/guest-services/hearing-impaired-services/

    I don't have experience flying, but would think that if you inform the airline if your disability when you book, then it will get noted and the flight attendants should be sure to inform you of announcements.

    Enjoy your vacation!
     
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  4. Disneynerdz16

    Disneynerdz16 Earning My Ears

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    FYI its a small world song is a catchy song but it DOES get stuck in your head!
     
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  5. SueM in MN

    SueM in MN combining the teacups with a roller coaster Moderator

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    For the air travel, check the Airline’s website and identify yourself as hearing impaired when you check in. His is a link to Southwest Airline Page about Services for customers with hearing impairments.
    https://www.southwest.com/html/cust...el-needs/customers-with-disabilities-pol.html

    This is copied from the bottom of that page and I imagine that all airlines would be similar.
    We ask that Customers who are deaf or hard of hearing and require assistance identify themselves and the type of assistance they require upon arrival at the airport, at the gate, onboard the aircraft, at any connection points, and at the destination. If a Customer identifies his/her needs to our Customer Service Agent at the departure gate and to our Flight Crew once onboard the aircraft, we can be sure to establish an acceptable means of communication. We will ensure that the Customer has prompt access to the same information provided to other Passengers in the gate area and onboard the aircraft (e.g., boarding and baggage claim information, schedule changes, flight safety information, etc.).

    It sounds like what you thought would help - sitting near the front - really didn’t help. Next time, you might want to ask the flight attendants to provide information to you in writing or each announcement.
    I don’t have any hearing impairments, but find the pilot’s announcements are usually very difficult to impossible to understand, so I can see how it is probably totally impossible for anyone with a hearing impairment!

    I can see how Small World would be especially difficult - there are sometimes multiple voices singing at the same time - sometimes in more then one language. If the ‘confusion of noise’ bothers you, you might feel better wearing ear plugs to mask it a little more and rely on scripts or other written assistance.
     
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  6. Talking Hands

    Talking Hands <font color=purple><b>|,,|/</b> DEAF DISNEY LOVER<

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    my best advice to you is to learn ASL.
    Disney provides interpretation, reflective captioning, assistive listening devices and open captioning (in some lines). The equipment can be obtained at Guest Services for a refundable deposit. You need to pick it up and return it each day. They are programed for the park you are in
     
  7. Disneynerdz16

    Disneynerdz16 Earning My Ears

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    I know a little of ASL when someone else signs but not much signing for me bc of cerebral palsy.
     
  8. Talking Hands

    Talking Hands <font color=purple><b>|,,|/</b> DEAF DISNEY LOVER<

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    People will adjust to your signing. Just met a beautiful young lady at church who is deaf and has cp. all of us adjusted to her signs quickly. She signs a bit slower and her shapes are not perfect but she was understandable.
     
  9. Karin1984

    Karin1984 DIS Veteran

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    For most airlines, whether you have a problem walking, seeing, a mental disability, or anything else. You can have everything noted in your booking, being deaf or hard of hearing included. Then the entire crew should be aware and will be able to assist you like the regular flight safety announcements but also if there are additional instructions for turbulence or connection announcements. When it's in the booking it saves you the trouble to inform the crew yourself, although it never hurts. Most likely due to this being in the booking, the purser or flight attendant in your area will come up to you before the flight departs.

    With most airlines you cannot do this yourself online, but something that has to be done by contacting the service center.
     
  10. mgrayar

    mgrayar Mouseketeer

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    Being the father of a 4 year old with profound hearing loss, I have a small understanding of your challenges. If I may ask, do you have hearing aids or a cochlear? I’m just trying to understand if your struggles relate to the ambient noise muffling out the noise you want to hear. This is what happens to my daughter in noisy areas. She hears everything due to her hearing aids and her brain no longer can focus on specific sounds. We use an FMA system so she can hear our voices directly which helps. However I’m not sure there is anything we can do on noisy rides. She is very visual and still enjoys them, and maybe it’s a blessing the IASW won’t be ringing in her head like it does ours.

    If you have an FMA or could get one, you could have a flight attendant wear that during the flight and not miss any of her instructions.
     

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