Am I just being overprotective about my son's football team?

ajk912

<font color=purple>Dum..dum...dum...we are in the
Joined
Jul 21, 2004
So I have to say, I am not sure if I am just being overprotective or if this is nuts or what? :confused:

So my son plays football for his elementary school. It's the second week of practice, it's 5 nights a week from 6-8. Yesterday was the first day they actually were in full gear, and most of the kids are first year tackle (my son included) so they are still learning the ropes. It happened yesterday and today that I guess my son wasn't applying himself as much as the coaches thought he should, so they told him to go run a lap around the playground (another kid as well, he was never by himself). To me, this is just over the top..we are having a heat wave here in VA, it was 95 degrees today, they were in full gear. So he wasn't at his best, who the heck cares. :confused3 We aren't talking pop warner here (I have heard those horror stories!) but 8 & 9 year olds playing for the public elementary school athletic assocation.

I was kind of griping about it to the other parents, and they just said, that's why the moms don't coach. :lmao: That is true, I would have cancelled practice being so hot. They only cancel practice if it's thunder and lightning, downpours are ok..which I know the boys find fun.

Thoughts? Am I being overprotective that this bothers me? I don't think I am going to say anything to the coaches, I don't want to do that. I don't think.
 

Pembo

OH-IO
Joined
Aug 19, 1999
My nephew played for our elementary league and my brother said the coaches were tougher on the kids that age than when he got to junior high and high school!

I don't think you are overprotective and I'd be very vigilant about heat exhaustion. That's a real hot button (pardon the pun) in sports right now.

My opinion here - sometimes the "volunteer" coaches think they are in the NFL. The paid coaches in the schools have a bit more knowledge...again my opinion
 

ajk912

<font color=purple>Dum..dum...dum...we are in the
Joined
Jul 21, 2004
My nephew played for our elementary league and my brother said the coaches were tougher on the kids that age than when he got to junior high and high school!

I don't think you are overprotective and I'd be very vigilant about heat exhaustion. That's a real hot button (pardon the pun) in sports right now.

My opinion here - sometimes the "volunteer" coaches think they are in the NFL. The paid coaches in the schools have a bit more knowledge...again my opinion
That's the only reason I was/am upset. I am sure it has to feel 15 degrees hotter with all that padding and that helmet on. I am like..these are KIDS. :mad: If it was a cool 70 degrees out, yeah, I would be ticked at my son for being a lazybutt. But when it's ALREADY over 90 degrees, these kids get props just for standing up. :lmao:

But I guess that goes back to the logic of, "This is why the moms don't coach football."
 
  • S. C.

    The mitten state
    Joined
    Nov 17, 2002
    I think you are correct for being concerned. I read an article last week where an athlete had died after practicing in extreme heat.
     

    minkydog

    DIS Cast Member
    Joined
    Dec 8, 2004
    I agree with the above poster. It's too hot at 95 degrees to be running around anywhere. Kids die every year because they were made to work out during extreme heat and not allowed enough water breaks.

    What are the league rules regarding extreme heat? In my county the school board has ruled that if the outside temps are above 88 degrees student athletes and band members are forbidden to work out in pads or wool uniforms, and must be allowed a 10 min water break every hour. Coaches and band directors are quite vigilant, too. If a student gets sick from heat, the adult in charge has to answer to the principal and the school board.

    We have had no incidents of heat exhaustion this year. :cool2:
     

    Smooshdog

    Dis Vet & Galactic Hero
    Joined
    Aug 14, 2006
    I played football through every stage of my life, and can say that taking a lap is not a big deal, its a very common way to attempt to get the kids to try harder. If I had a dollar for every lap I took, well I'd have spent that money by now. :rotfl:

    Point being, don't worry about your son taking a lap, that's just part of football and almost every sport. Sports involve running/hitting/tackling/ and the elements are also a part of the game.

    When you need to worry and step in is if your son or any other kids on the team are not allowed frequent water/rest breaks. Extreme heat is not the problem, the problem is not getting the frequent water breaks.

    Heck get the other moms to join you and pitch in and bring waters/poweraides/fruit up to the practices for the team, I'm sure the coaches wouldn't mind at all and that way you have peace of mind.
     

    daisyduck123

    <font color=green>I just love those parmesan mashe
    Joined
    Aug 18, 2005
    Hey we're over here in Maryland and my DS11's football team (his first year as well) has been practicing M-F every day 6-8pm since July 27, and they've been in full gear since July 28. And boy, has it been HOT. My DS has had to run some extra laps as well.

    I have learned in these past few weeks to just STAY HOME and let DH go to the practices. ;)
     
  • Momvic5

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Sep 24, 2007
    It is crazy isn't it??...We live in Texas, and it is almost always over 95 degrees at this time of year. My older Ds played football from the ages 8 to 11, and they ran like mad dogs in full gear in the summer heat. It was intense, and the boys cried tears regularly (of course more loudly as they passed mom)due to the heat, but they somehow continued on and loved it. Though tears were shed while running laps, the boys always found renewed strength after practice and would chase eachother around in full gear with sweat pouring from them.
     

    Jaimee

    <font color=red>DIS Veteran<br><font color=blue>Th
    Joined
    Nov 23, 2000
    My DS played his first year of tackle last year at 10 yrs old. I agree that as long as they are getting water breaks he should be fine. DS hated the running at first, but said it got easier after the first 2 weeks. He decided not to join this year because our local teams is a most popular dads club :rolleyes1 Being a single mom I didn't fit so DS didn't get to play as much as he'd like. For some reason only the kids who had dads that were coaching were getting to play every game. So, DS is sticking to basketball and we're all much happier lol.
     

    ksjayhawks

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Feb 14, 2004
    I played football through every stage of my life, and can say that taking a lap is not a big deal, its a very common way to attempt to get the kids to try harder. If I had a dollar for every lap I took, well I'd have spent that money by now. :rotfl:

    Point being, don't worry about your son taking a lap, that's just part of football and almost every sport. Sports involve running/hitting/tackling/ and the elements are also a part of the game.

    When you need to worry and step in is if your son or any other kids on the team are not allowed frequent water/rest breaks. Extreme heat is not the problem, the problem is not getting the frequent water breaks.

    Heck get the other moms to join you and pitch in and bring waters/poweraides/fruit up to the practices for the team, I'm sure the coaches wouldn't mind at all and that way you have peace of mind.
    Couldn't have said it better!

    Yes, you are being overprotective. Let the coaches coach. The lap won't hurt him or the others. Make sure they have plenty of water to drink.
     

    IDoDis

    Knows the password to get into the Moose Lodge
    Joined
    Jan 14, 2006
    My 10 yr old DS is in his 2nd year of YAFL (Young American Football League). They've been practicing since July 20th from 6-8pm out here in the desert heat which has been in the high 90s each day. They were in shorts & helmets the first day, but after that it was full pads, too. Same thing last year as well. One thing the coach is doing this year is having them do their exercise laps at the end of practice when it's cooler instead of at the beginning when it's blazing hot.

    Running a discipline lap is not unusual. Sometimes it's one kid and sometimes the whole team. Today the whole team was goofing off and not listening to the coach so they all had to run a lap at two different times. It's also bad form to come in last place when doing those laps. Last year, DS was not in shape for running and used to cry almost every day after running 3 laps. He'd come over to get water afterward and be sobbing. The coach used to run behind him and push at his back a little to encourage him and keep him going, because if he stopped to walk, he'd have to run an extra lap.

    Now DS runs and finishes about 6th place in the laps which is a huge improvement for him. He says running laps is not so bad now. It's the suicide drills that still make him almost cry though.
     
  • SandrA9810

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jul 24, 2005
    It's tough for any kid to run laps at first.
    I was in the colorguard my freshman year of HS, running laps and push ups were two major punishments for not doing the right thing. Every first year person thinks it's cruel and unusual punishment, but by the end of the year no one thinks anything of it. By then, most kids learn how to stay out of trouble. There's kids all cross the US that play football in the heat. Here in Florida it doesn't get into the 80's till half the season is over. And I'm sure in the desert it's just as bad for summer practices.

    We're just too accustomed to our air conditioned house, to get into our air conditioned car, to park as close as possible to get to the air conditioned building. But once you get used to working out in the heat, it's really not that bad.

    Water breaks are the most important part and that's what you should be vigilant about.
     

    pirateofthecarolinas

    <font color=FF00CC>AIN'T ain't a word!<br><font co
    Joined
    Oct 20, 2003
    My DS15 and DS7 both play football. The coaches are a different breed! I can't sit through practices. My DH has to go. I can't take all of the yelling and running. They do get a lot of water breaks.

    One day my DS15 got in the car after weight training and started to cry. He still won't tell me what happened. All he would say is that his coach was verbally abusive to him that day. Unfortunately, it's just the way it is. My DS15 says his baseball coaches look tame compared to his football coaches.

    I personally would be thrilled if they both stopped playing.
     

    golfgal

    DIS Cast Member<br><font color=green>When did vacu
    Joined
    Nov 27, 2004
    I am SO glad my boys did not play football. It frustrates me that parents take the "that is just the way it is" attitude. You know what, it doesn't have to be that way and it shouldn't. First, little kids do NOT need to practice 5 days/week for 2 hours at time-it is REALLY bad for their bodies, never mind the heat aspect. There is NO REASON any coach needs to be verbally abusive to the point of making kids cry. I am a huge sports fan, coached for many, many years at the high school level and it drove me NUTS to see coaches act like this.
     

    ajk912

    <font color=purple>Dum..dum...dum...we are in the
    Joined
    Jul 21, 2004
    I personally would be thrilled if they both stopped playing.
    You and me both!!! I like basketball best..it seems MUCH more low key. I don't mind basketball season at all. Plus, it gives us all something to do during the dead of winter. Football..yikes..I just want us all to make it through the season.

    Thanks everyone for your advice. DS was fine about an hour afterwards. He says he likes football, he says some parts really suck but for the most part it's all good!!!

    I feel bad for those who do the drills in these temps year round. We should be starting to cool off here in VA shortly..at least out of the 90s! :scared1:
     

    Mkrop

    I just cant go on demand
    Joined
    Feb 26, 2007
    I am SO glad my boys did not play football. It frustrates me that parents take the "that is just the way it is" attitude. You know what, it doesn't have to be that way and it shouldn't. First, little kids do NOT need to practice 5 days/week for 2 hours at time-it is REALLY bad for [/B]their bodies, never mind the heat aspect. There is NO REASON any coach needs to be verbally abusive to the point of making kids cry. I am a huge sports fan, coached for many, many years at the high school level and it drove me NUTS to see coaches act like this.


    Not true, it is important for them to practice and practice and practice some more so they learn the plays, learn how to tackle properly etc, WHY? So they are SAFE during the game. This sport I am learning is like no other. These kids need to be safe.

    OP make sure your son is well hydrated ALL DAY, not just bringing and drinking during practice. This is key. By the time you are thirsty it is too late.

    They need to run laps to get conditioned once again so injury doesnt occur. And laps are a good discipline tool. DH used it as a baseball coach. You need to remind your son that by paying attention he will not have to run the extra laps. Dont place all the blame on the coaches.

    Last year was DS11 first eyar playing tackle, he had one of his first major asthma attacks the first day of full pads, after running the first warm up lap. Was it bc it was 90+ that day at 6pm, no it ws bc he did not do his inhaler before the practice like he was suppose to. He learned his lesson and his coaches were awesome.

    I dont agree with abusive coaches, but making kids run laps in the heat is not abusive. Kids do it all across the country in varyng degrees of weather.
     

    golfgal

    DIS Cast Member<br><font color=green>When did vacu
    Joined
    Nov 27, 2004
    Not true, it is important for them to practice and practice and practice some more so they learn the plays, learn how to tackle properly etc, WHY? So they are SAFE during the game. This sport I am learning is like no other. These kids need to be safe.

    OP make sure your son is well hydrated ALL DAY, not just bringing and drinking during practice. This is key. By the time you are thirsty it is too late.

    They need to run laps to get conditioned once again so injury doesnt occur. And laps are a good discipline tool. DH used it as a baseball coach. You need to remind your son that by paying attention he will not have to run the extra laps. Dont place all the blame on the coaches.

    Last year was DS11 first eyar playing tackle, he had one of his first major asthma attacks the first day of full pads, after running the first warm up lap. Was it bc it was 90+ that day at 6pm, no it ws bc he did not do his inhaler before the practice like he was suppose to. He learned his lesson and his coaches were awesome.

    I dont agree with abusive coaches, but making kids run laps in the heat is not abusive. Kids do it all across the country in varyng degrees of weather.
    I am sorry to disagree but it is VERY true. The overuse of their bodies at such a young age will lead to major problems down the road. No one said they don't need to practice but they DON'T need to practice that MUCH.
     

    Pembo

    OH-IO
    Joined
    Aug 19, 1999
    I am SO glad my boys did not play football. It frustrates me that parents take the "that is just the way it is" attitude. You know what, it doesn't have to be that way and it shouldn't. First, little kids do NOT need to practice 5 days/week for 2 hours at time-it is REALLY bad for their bodies, never mind the heat aspect. There is NO REASON any coach needs to be verbally abusive to the point of making kids cry. I am a huge sports fan, coached for many, many years at the high school level and it drove me NUTS to see coaches act like this.

    I agree with you. It's little kid football not the NFL. Like I said earlier my nephew had harder practices in the city league than in junior high and now high school. There is something wrong there.......
     

    Mkrop

    I just cant go on demand
    Joined
    Feb 26, 2007
    I am sorry to disagree but it is VERY true. The overuse of their bodies at such a young age will lead to major problems down the road. No one said they don't need to practice but they DON'T need to practice that MUCH.
    No it is the specializing in one sport that does damage down the road, not 5 a days at the beg of a season.

    We complain about kids not getting enough excercise, this is why.

    We have had parent meetings with the coaches where all this has been explained over and over. Some parents had these EXACT concerns and this is how it was addressed. These guys have been coaching and or playing for years. DH played, he does not coach (does baseball bc it works better with work schedule) and this is how he explained it as well.
     

    IDoDis

    Knows the password to get into the Moose Lodge
    Joined
    Jan 14, 2006
    Football season is pretty short. DS has only 8 regular games in the season. If they make the play-offs then there's 2 more games and then the super bowl. They start practicing 2 weeks before the first game, so really we are talking about 10 weeks here. I don't think a child's body is going to be ruined for practicing 2 hours a day for 10 weeks. They don't condition the entire 2 hours. They practice all kinds of skills. Yesterday DS's coach had them practice plays in slow motion. It was pretty funny to watch.

    DS's coach is a boy scout leader, as well. He's very kind to the boys, but he also knows what they need to be ready to play and not get injured. A PP was absolutely right about the conditioning helping them avoid injuries.

    My DS has always been a little larger than other kids his age. He doesn't wear plus sizes in pants, but he's never been able to wear a slims, either. Being in football really helps him stay healthier. I think we're going to put him in wrestling after football so he can continue to condition and stay fit.
     

    Connect

    Disney News and Updates

    Daily Updates and News




    Top