Your DSLR at Disney

Discussion in 'Photography Board' started by indiesgirl4ever, Jan 13, 2013.

  1. indiesgirl4ever

    indiesgirl4ever DCP Fall 2014

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    This has probably been asked so many times but I have a Canon Rebel T3 With a 75-300mm lense and18-55mm lense. I was wondering what kind of camera bag do you recommend for bringing your DSLR around disney?
    Thanks!
     
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  3. Gianna'sPapa

    Gianna'sPapa DIS Veteran

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    This really is an idividual choice issue. Some like traditional style backpacks, others cross body, others messenger style, others slip the extra lens into a purse or a belt lens case. I carry a lot of gear to the parks including tripod, 3-4 lenses, external flash, sometimes an extra camera body w/battery grip, extra batteries, filters, etc. I need a good sized backpack to carry all that. More important is the strap that I use. Since I use a battery grip on all my cameras, I need a very comfortable strap and I use the Black Rapid system. I always have my primary camera out and ready to go so its imperative that the strap be comfortable. Early in my DSLR career I went to WDW with what I thought was a good neck strap. Within two hours, I had excruciating neck pain and a screaming headache. For me a cross body strap was the answer.
     
  4. photo_chick

    photo_chick Knows a little about a lot of things, a lot about

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    Like already said, there's a lot of approaches here and you just have to figure out what works for you.

    I don't normally use a camera bag at WDW. I keep my camera around my neck, or slung across my body, so it's out for me to use. A comfy strap is so important if you go this route. Everyone has their faves, I like the Crumpler INdustry Disgrace. I keep a lenscoat bodybag on the camera to protect it from bumps. I have my walkaround lens on it and sometimes an additional lens or two, memory cards and batteries in the hip pack where I carry our water and rain ponchos.

    When I use a dedicated bag it's most often my Tamrac Messenger 4 and still just to carry lenses. I still keep my camera out because I don't like the hassle of taking the camera out and putting the camera back into the bag.
     
  5. boBQuincy

    boBQuincy <font color=green>I am not carrying three pods<br>

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    I keep my camera in my hand (wrist strap usually) and while I do normally carry a bag it is for lenses and such. The camera stays out because we never know when a great photo opportunity may come up.
     
  6. DSLRuser

    DSLRuser Age is a state of mind

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    I carry a pretty slim backpack that fits a body, 3-4 lenses, flash, and some misc junk.

    Most of the time my camera is attached to me with a wrist strap. It's the most natural for me. I hated a neck strap. The body was always bumping my stomach, or I felt the lenses would hit a wallor something.

    By being on my wrist, I have complete controll.

    I put the body in the backpack as needed.
     
  7. bob100

    bob100 DIS Veteran

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    I use a plain army type messenger bag which easily holds a DSLR and two lens
     
  8. havoc315

    havoc315 DIS Veteran

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    I use a lowepro backpack which I love, but along with personal preference, it depends on how much gear you are carrying.
    Beyond lenses, spare battery, extra memory cards, etc.

    If you are just going with the kit lens and 1 telephoto lens, you really don't need the telephoto lens with you at all times. For example, it would be pretty useless at night without a tripod. The safari is the only time you truly "need" it.
    Thus, you can often go into the park traveling very light. Camera around your neck, and maybe an extra memory card and battery in your pocket.
     
  9. DSLRuser

    DSLRuser Age is a state of mind

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    This is the one that gets me. i have never needed a second battery. It's my nightly ritual on vacation to charge up and clear out cards.
     
  10. photo_chick

    photo_chick Knows a little about a lot of things, a lot about

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    I take a battery but have never had need for it. I'd rather have it and not use it then not have it and need it. I did once go to Epcot for an ADR with just my camera, no extra bag or anything. No memory card either. It was in the card reader in the room connected to the laptop still. So having an extra of something is never a bad thing.
     
  11. havoc315

    havoc315 DIS Veteran

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    Depends on the camera, and size of card you are shooting with.
    I love my current dSLR, but the battery is horrible due to the EVF. Only about 200-250 shots. I can easily go through a whole fully charged battery before the end if the day. I've never had to change memory cards mid day though.
     
  12. boBQuincy

    boBQuincy <font color=green>I am not carrying three pods<br>

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    My Rebel Xsi has a small battery and it often totally drained one during a long day at WDW. My strategy for memory cards is to only dump them when I get home so I always need more than one on even a short trip. Taking HDR sets can fill a card quickly! :)
     
  13. indiesgirl4ever

    indiesgirl4ever DCP Fall 2014

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    Thank you for the suggestions! Camera bag I feel was a strong word just something to carry it in for easy access. I originally felt that carrying around my neck was risky but i see alot of people actually opt for doing that so that is good to here. Thank you guys for the great advice, I really appreciate it!
     
  14. DSLRuser

    DSLRuser Age is a state of mind

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    ouch. My D7000 gets me 750+ shots on a charge.

    i dont use live view. rarely review shots after taking them, its turned off. And i use external flash when needed.
     
  15. havoc315

    havoc315 DIS Veteran

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    The curse of the Sony SLTs... battery drain of the electronic viewfinder. The newest models are getting a bit better. I believe that the A55 is officially rated for 350 shots. But I think this is only under ideal circumstances. Seems more like 200-250 to me.
    According to snapsort, the A57 is officially rated for up to 550 shots. So getting better. But snapsort rated the Nikon D7000 as 1050 shots.

    So yeah.... The A55 gives me about 1/3rd of the battery life that you are getting on the Nikon D7000. (the tradeoff being my camera is cheaper, lighter, in-camera lens stabilization, higher ISO (though the Nikon's ISO range is actually more usable), and faster burst rate (10fps vs 6 fps).

    Each camera brings pros and cons. But I wouldn't mind a longer battery life. On my old camera, I only had to charge the battery once every couple of days. No, I have to charge twice a day, or have a backup.
     
  16. photo_chick

    photo_chick Knows a little about a lot of things, a lot about

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    I'll shoot 2000 easily at my DD's dance concerts with my 50D and not drain the battery. They're typically 3 acts over 6-8 hours. Rehearsal, where I shoot even more, lasts about 12 hours. I do check the histogram quickly every time the lighting setup changes but I never use the flash. I also review a lot of images backstage with other moms. And even knowing I have the battery life to do all that I still have an extra in my pocket because you just never know.
     
  17. cpbjgc

    cpbjgc <font color=green>Earned My Ears<br><font color=bl

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    As official family Sherpa (though less of a duty now that the kids are older) I always use my Lowepro Fastback 350 because it allows me to carry my camera with a 70-200mm lens attached (plus it is a comfortable backpack). I also usually end up carrying ponchos/rain jackets, snacks, bandages, tylenol, Lomography fisheye film camera, etc. in the top of the pack and whatever lenses and flash in the bottom. At the park the camera is usally out and around my neck.

    I also carry a number of smaller memory cards and an extra battery. While I do back up my photos every night on a portable drive, I prefer to keep the photos on the card until I get home to get them on my desktop computer. Having had to recover photos for others from corrupted cards, I like to spread the risk of lost photos by using smaller cards. And since I have the room, I always have an extra battery, though I can usually get a couple days shooting off a single charge.
     
  18. boBQuincy

    boBQuincy <font color=green>I am not carrying three pods<br>

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    Mirrorless have the same problem, maybe worse with their smaller batteries. The electronic viewfinder is power hungry, my G3 typically goes through two batteries in a 12 hour day at WDW. However, even with carrying the extra batteries my load is still a lot less than most dSLRs!
     
  19. mikegood2

    mikegood2 DIS Veteran

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    While a second battery may not be needed for some, I consider it a necessity. Many cameras have inexpensive third party alternative that can save you a lot of money. Just make sure you read the reviews and remember it is just a backup.

    On our last trip one day we had a glitch with our charger and it didn't charge our batteries, even though it said it did. Luckily we had our backup which alowed us to squeak buy that day. Also, if you shoot much video, prepare for more battery drain.

    Sent from my iPad mini using DISBoards
     
  20. havoc315

    havoc315 DIS Veteran

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    I had flirted with the idea of switching to the NEX for similar reasons... and all my Sony/Minolta glass could work with a Nex and an adaptor. But I realized, once I stuck on the adaptor and larger glass, I wouldn't really be saving much in the size/weight department, and I'd be losing a few things (like in-camera image stabilization)
     

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